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Do you agree the A+ needs a serious re-writting?

Discussion in 'A+' started by Juelz, Aug 28, 2017.

  1. Juelz

    Juelz Gigabyte Poster

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    TBH 90% of what I know about IT I learned from the internet then just setup virtual environments and testing it out. I remember when Active Directory would scare the hell out of me.. I knew buggerall about it so I sat and I learned the basics by watching videos online.. then started to learn how to fix it when it breaks.. few months later I was the go-to guy for AD issues at my job, Id even go as far as saying I had the strongest AD knowledge on my team.. when there was an AD issue it would be bounced to me before being moved up to tier 3 if I couldnt fix it.
     
    WIP: bit of this bit of that
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  2. dales

    dales Terabyte Poster

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    I'm pretty sure that the A+ has always been like that. When i did it as my first cert {Cough, Cough} years ago it covered similar things by the sounds of it and the Mike Meyers book was alarmingly large, heavy and covered a very broad range in terms of subject. I remember having to memorise CPU Pins/sockets types (anyone remember Cyrix CPU's) pins on SIMMs and DIMMS ISA cards, IRQ's and a bunch of other stuff thats long been consigned to file 13.
    Most exams you take will have an element of that where you don't really need to know it for day to day operations but its part of the objectives and having a vague recollection of its existence even if you have to google it to jog your memory is helpful.

    When I obtained my A+ it helped me get my first proper IT job building and troubleshooting pc's in an independent workshop and helped me develop methods for study and maintaining interest even when you think the subject matter holds little value.
     
    Certifications: vExpert 2014+2015+2016,VCP-DT,CCE-V, CCE-AD, CCP-AD, CCEE, CCAA XenApp, CCA Netscaler, XenApp 6.5, XenDesktop 5 & Xenserver 6,VCP3+5,VTSP,MCSA MCDST MCP A+ ITIL F
    WIP: Nothing
  3. Sparky
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    Sparky Zettabyte Poster Moderator

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    Ok then :)

    All good but for any future job you apply for it’s difficult to quantify lab work. Also if the lab work is constructive then the exams should be fairly straight forward no?


    Not sure why the A+ is getting such a beating.

    It’s an entry level certification which can be a good first certification for someone to get into the discipline to study and hopefully pass an exam. From there they can decide what cert path they want to take.

    Also having just returned back from the States the CompTIA certs do seem to be widely recognised when I spoke to IT companies based over there.

    Handy link that shows how CompTIA certs tie in with other MS\Cisco certs.

    www.comptia.org/certsroadmap
     
    Certifications: MSc MCSE MCSA:M MCSA:S MCITP:EA MCTS(x5) Security+ Network+ A+
    WIP: Exchange 2007\2010
  4. dmarsh

    dmarsh Terabyte Poster

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    That is why we have interviews, references and probationary periods. Plenty of professions out there like plumber and surgeon, where they don't rely on a computer based exam.

    Unfortunately not, I'm not saying the A+ is the worst, but there are plenty of certification exams out there that deliberately test outside the curriculum or have no fixed curriculum or trick questions. Its entirely possible to do good lab work and even have good experience and if you don't study to the exam and possibly go on an official training you can easily fail.

    In the US they have managed to corner the market and insist that their qualifications are mandatory for many government jobs. This means they can basically become a tax on doing business or getting a job, not a good thing at all IMHO. IT has generally always been fairly meritocratic, based on talent, not pieces of paper, or being able to pay to pass the right exams, I'd like to keep it that way.

    Its also rather expensive, time consuming and requires taking two exams. Which isn't really justifiable in my opinion.
     
    Last edited: Sep 2, 2017
  5. Sparky
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    When there is the usual 100 or so CVs that come in for an IT support job the lab work doesn’t really add much to the CV whereas experience and certs do.


    That’s what I was getting at – some lab work can be constructive but you get to pick and choose what you are interested in. Taking the cert route (perhaps using recommended cert materials) pushes you into areas that you may not cover when messing around with some VMs.

    I’m not saying passing whatever cert it is makes the individual a guru in whatever product was covered in the exam but at least there is something to show on your CV when the exam is passed in comparison to random lab work.

    Several MSPs in the States put their techs through CompTIA certs and I did the same thing here. If was a good first impression when I met a few MSPs in the States as we are looking to partner with a couple of US based MSPs just now.



    All fully justifiable… :) :)

    Expensive? Save up

    Time Consuming? Make time

    Two exams? No big deal
     
    Certifications: MSc MCSE MCSA:M MCSA:S MCITP:EA MCTS(x5) Security+ Network+ A+
    WIP: Exchange 2007\2010
  6. Juelz

    Juelz Gigabyte Poster

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    Depends, on the employer I got my first gig based on lab work, and tbh now onto my second IT employer when being interviewed they asked if I had experience with Windows server etc.. I explained yes as I setup test environments, watched tutorials so I could talk about server roles, AD, Domain Controller etc etc. could even talk my way through Group Policy as again I played with it in the lab.
     
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  7. dmarsh

    dmarsh Terabyte Poster

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    Ones time on this planet is finite, money is finite also, I'm simply saying I think there are places that time and money could be better spent. Young people going for an A+ aren't generally rich, that £300 on exams could be put towards a laptop or some books or a pluralsight subscription.

    I saved up to buy my first house cash, and I've taken over 70 exams, I'm aware of the general arguments, I just don't agree, make time for whats important, and the A+ exam is not important.

    Paying for bits of paper off some american corporation doesn't really mean much in most cases, and if you think that's your best chance to land a job, well then I really don't know what to tell you.
     
    Last edited: Sep 2, 2017
  8. Sparky
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    Yeah I’m just putting another point of view across.

    The A+ or any cert may not mean anything to someone trying to progress in their IT career however it may mean something to a future employer or when you are trying to promote your own company.

    As for CompTIA the people I have met that represent them have been easy to deal with and very helpful.
     
    Certifications: MSc MCSE MCSA:M MCSA:S MCITP:EA MCTS(x5) Security+ Network+ A+
    WIP: Exchange 2007\2010
  9. Sparky
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    I’m surprised you got the gig purely on lab work – perhaps more to do with how you put yourself across in the interview and how you would fit in with the current team?

    Don’t get me wrong lab work always shows a willingness to learn and a big plus point.
     
    Certifications: MSc MCSE MCSA:M MCSA:S MCITP:EA MCTS(x5) Security+ Network+ A+
    WIP: Exchange 2007\2010
  10. Pseudonym

    Pseudonym Byte Poster

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    Am I missing something here?
     
  11. Juelz

    Juelz Gigabyte Poster

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    True, I was amazing in the interview to be fair.
     
    WIP: bit of this bit of that
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