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Do Architects still take technical exams?

Discussion in 'The Lounge - Off Topic' started by jk2447, Aug 25, 2014.

  1. jk2447

    jk2447 Petabyte Poster Moderator

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    Hi all

    With my impending move from 3rd/4th line server support to solutions architecture, I wonder, do architects still sit technical exams such as the VCP, MCSE, CCIE etc? Does anyone know?

    I probably won't ever click a button again but I would hate to think that I would lose touch altogether. I am planning to throw some more kit at my home lab so that I can still keep my finger on the pulse but am I kidding myself? My lab could never match the enterprise environments I work with now (although ebay does have some used SANs and industrial kit, albeit out of support kit, for cheap).

    I suppose I'm wondering how do Architects stay technical?

    Cheers
    James
     
    Certifications: BSc (Hons), HND IT, HND Computing, ITIL-F, MBCS CITP, MCP (270,290,291,293,294,298,299,410,411,412) MCTS (401,620,624,652) MCSA:Security, MCSE: Security, Security+, CPTS, VCP4, CCA (XenApp6.5), MCSA 2012, VCP5, VCP6-NV
  2. Monkeychops

    Monkeychops Kilobyte Poster

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    From my experiences dealing with architects I'd say there is an element of 'it depends', but by and large sorry to say no they mostly do not stay with the technical certifications.

    However as said it's very dependent on what your are an architect for, if you're an infrastructure architect who works solely with Microsoft technologies (bearing in mind architecture should also largely be technology agnostic up to a point ;) ) then it would more than likely make sense to keep your hand in and know what the products can do.

    If you're a higher level architect then not so much, generally starting from the top you'd have enterprise architect > solution architect > <specific area> architect (that's from the BCS course for you ;) ).

    In my particular domain of IT (I've never been an 'architect' by job title but have worked with them in many capacities over the years) it tends to be the more theoretical type certifications that they've done (CISA, CISM etc).

    But saying all that it doesn't mean that you don't have to as you should have plenty of interaction with the systems guys throughout designs, personally it can be a good thing but I'd say just don't let the fact that you may be certified in one particular technology or product unnecessarily bias any design work if you're not at the product level yet.

    Sometimes can be bad to go into a fresh bit of work hell bent on using a specific product already, not always a problem but have seen it cause issues before.
     
    Last edited: Aug 25, 2014
    jk2447 likes this.
  3. jk2447

    jk2447 Petabyte Poster Moderator

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    Thanks monkey. It feels like a weird concept for me to not have to worry about MCSEs or VCPs. I've studied for these types of certifications for years. I will probably try to take a few certs as I go, or just take the design exams from the vendors and not worry too much about the certificate. An MCSE for instance has elements of design but the elements that cover install configure, I just won't need them anymore by the sounds of it.

    I'll let you know how I get on, it's going to be strange going so high level. I hope it's the right move because I also had the choice to go into an engineering, hands on uber technical role...
     
    Certifications: BSc (Hons), HND IT, HND Computing, ITIL-F, MBCS CITP, MCP (270,290,291,293,294,298,299,410,411,412) MCTS (401,620,624,652) MCSA:Security, MCSE: Security, Security+, CPTS, VCP4, CCA (XenApp6.5), MCSA 2012, VCP5, VCP6-NV

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