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DNS server DC settings

Discussion in 'Windows Server 2003 / 2008 / 2012 Exams' started by dales, Feb 12, 2008.

  1. dales

    dales Gigabyte Poster

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    Hi all,

    I'm having a bit of a tough time figuring out what I need to do. I have a dc and a xp pro workstation, the dc has dns set up on it and I am at a bit of a loss as to how you get the dns server to look to the internet for names it cannot resolve.

    For example I've set up DHCP so that all the clients get the dns client settings as the server (in this case 192.168.1.8 ) but how do I get the server to look elsewhere (to the net), you cant add it to the static ip address of the server as that isnt best practice and the clients still wont be able to connect. so do I have to do something with the dns snapin to configure it?

    This is proberbly a stupid question but as the 290 doesnt seem to require this knowledge and my googling hasnt bought anything up im at a bit of a loss as to what to do now!?:oops:
     
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  2. onoski

    onoski Terabyte Poster

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    I belief what you're trying to achieve can't be done using the private 192.168.x.x IP address range. On the other hand is your DNS server combined with your AD setup or a seperate.

    I am sure you can look into dynamic ip addressing as am sure there's free ones out there or a small fee for one.
     
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  3. Modey

    Modey Terabyte Poster

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    DNS forwarders are your friend. The DNS values you should be giving in DHCP should be the IP address of your DC/DNS server since it's one and the same in this case.

    Then on your server, you need to set the DNS forwarders up in order to forward DNS requests that it can't resolve on to your ISP's DNS addresses.

    Have a look here, then skip to the 'how to configure forwarders section'

    http://support.microsoft.com/kb/323380

    p.s. You are correct in that you wouldn't be expected to know this for the 70-290, it's much more a 70-291 kind of thing. Even so, it's fairly essential knowledge when it comes to configuring a DNS server.
     
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  4. dales

    dales Gigabyte Poster

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    thanks modey, I shall look into that when I've finished cooking the tea!
     
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  5. Toasty

    Toasty Byte Poster

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    Hi,

    If you set your DNS forwarder to the ip address of your router.
    It will then use your ISP's DNS serves.

    This is how we are set up at work.

    Hope this helps you.

    Regards

    Toasty
     
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  6. Modey

    Modey Terabyte Poster

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    I think that would work in most situations, but would depend on how the router is configured.
     
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