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DNS Error (I Think)

Discussion in 'Software' started by jackd, Jan 28, 2007.

  1. jackd

    jackd Megabyte Poster

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    This is on Windows 2003 Server.

    Right i ran dcpromo and entered 15meadowdale.internal as my full dns name and i told it to config DNS for me. When i try and add a computer to the domain i type for the domain 15meadowdale.internal. Then i type my admin user and password but it says the format of the specified network name is invalid.
    then i type my admin user and password but it says the format of the specified network name is invalid
     
  2. Boycie
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    Boycie Senior Beer Tester

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    Jack,

    Did the Wizard complete without error?

    what do you get when typing nslookup from the domain controller?
     
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  3. jackd

    jackd Megabyte Poster

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    Yes the wizard completed without an error.

    On running nslookup from the DC i get
    Default Server:localhost
    Address:127.0.0.1

    It looks like thats the problem but how would i fix it.
     
  4. Boycie
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    Boycie Senior Beer Tester

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    Jack,

    I am making my own notes as i go through my 2003 Server courseware. I have ommited some stuff, but post back if this doesn't helpl you.
    Here goes;

    Configuring DNS

    Start > All Programs > Admin tools > DNS

    In the left pane open up the server you want to configure DNS on and open Forward Lookup Zones. Find the zone for the name of your domain.com
    Make sure there is a host entry for the server.

    Right Click on the domain and select properties. When DNS is installed through the Active Directory Wizard, the Zone type is set to Active directory integrated and dynamic updates are set for *only secure updates*.

    You will need to create a reverse look zone for the domain. It is needed to use the NSLOOKUP utility to test DNS is working correctly and troubleshoot any problems that may arise.
    Right click on the reverse lookup zones folder and select new zone. The Wizard will start.
    Choose the same type of zone that the forward lookup zone is set to.

    You will be asked to type in the network ID for the reverse zone. For example, 192.168.1.x

    On the DNS console, open the Reverse lookup zones folder and you should now see the 192.168.1.x subnet.

    You now need to create a pointer record for the DNS server. This should be the only pointer record you will have to create manually because any other
    Clients that support dynamic updates will automatically update and create their own host and pointer record. The server did not update or create a pointer record automatically because there was no reverse lookup zone available when the host record was originally created. Right click on the 192.168.1.x subnet and select new pointer.

    The dialog box will appear asking you for the Host IP address and host name of the pointer record. Type in 1 and servername.thenameofyourdomain.com for the hostname and click OK.

    On the DNS console, you should now have a pointer record for 192.168.1.1 (or whatever network you have chosen to use).
    You can now close the console.

    You can now test DNS is working.
    type nslookup from the command prompt.
    The nslookup utility will look for the DNS Server on the network and return the hostname and IP address of the server.
    You should have the hostname and IP address of the server.

    Active Directory Install

    Run > DCPROMO and the Active Directory wizard will begin.

    Note: When promoting a server to a domain controller, you need to have it plugged in to a hub or crossover cable to another machine or the Active Directory Wizard will fail, usually without reason.

    You have the choice of making a fresh controller, or a backup controller. You also have the choice of making a new domain tree or creating a new child domain in an existing tree.

    You can build domain trees so they are in a hierarchy as long as they have contiguous (continuous) name space.
    For example;

    Root – thenameofmydomain.com
    Child - city.thenameofmydomain.com

    When you build a new domain controller with a new domain it will be the root of a new tree.

    You will have the option of creating a new forest or joining an existing one. You can place domain trees in to forests.

    You will need to enter the full DNS domain name for your new domain.

    You will be prompted for a NetBIOS name for the domain which is 15 characters with no periods.

    The wizard will suggest a name for you; based on the domain name you entered earlier using the NetBIOS name rules.
    You can alter this name, although it is unwise - effectively, your domain will have two names.

    In a *real* environment it is wise to place Active Directory and its logs on a separate physical hard drive to increase performance.
    The default setting is %systemroot% \WINNT\NTDS for the directory and log.

    You can also choose the location of the SYSVOL folder. This folder stores any user configuration, default profiles and log on scripts.
    It is automatically shared and replicates to other domain controllers throughout active directory.

    The next dialog box will say it was unable to find the DNS Server that handles the name of your domain and will ask you to;

    Check DNS or configure a DNS server on the server. Active Directory was designed to work with DNS and will not function without a DNS server that provides name resolution.

    Select yes to install DNS otherwise the Active Directory wizard will stop.

    Directory services restore mode administrator password is used to protect against anyone other than an administrator from rebuilding the Active Directory database from the directory services restore mode.
    The password is different from any logon password and should really be different from any other logon password just in case the admin account is compromised.
     
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  5. zimbo
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    zimbo Petabyte Poster

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    heres your problem... is the domain controller on the same machine as the dns server? open the connection properties of the domain controller and check that you have put an IP in the prefered DNS server (the IP of your dns server). What nslookup is using is a loopback address so the DC cant actually perform name resolution.
     

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  6. Sparky
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    Sparky Zettabyte Poster Moderator

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    Give the server a static I.P and then demote it. Then run the 'add role' wizard and make the server a DC, that should configure DNS for you.

    For the client PC make sure it is pointing at the DC for DNS...
     
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  7. zimbo
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    zimbo Petabyte Poster

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    Sparky the problem is on the DC - no client yet.. and from the sounds of it DNS is on the same server as AD.
     
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  8. Sparky
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    Sparky Zettabyte Poster Moderator

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    The original problem is that jack cant add a PC to the domain. Its not too difficult to set up a DC on Windows 2003 as long as the server has a valid static I.P address assigned to start with.
     
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  9. zimbo
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    zimbo Petabyte Poster

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    :oops: missed that part.. well then his client.. he hasnt put in the Prefered DNS Server
     
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  10. Sparky
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    Sparky Zettabyte Poster Moderator

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    Yup, that should sort the problem. Cant say for sure without checking how the DC was configured to start with. I would expect to see servername.domain.local when doing the nslookup which makes me think the reverse lookup zone isnt configured, could be wrong though! :biggrin
     
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  11. Bluerinse
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    Bluerinse Exabyte Poster

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    Jack, what is the NetBIOS name of the client PC that you are trying to join to the domain?
     
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