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DHCP Best Practice

Discussion in 'Network Infrastructure' started by zimbo, Aug 26, 2006.

  1. zimbo
    Honorary Member

    zimbo Petabyte Poster

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    Another MS way type question but lets say im defining a scope and it will include static IP's.... what is the *MS way* for the exams? Exclude them or start from the next avaliable IP? Personally i would exclude them but like we know MS doesnt care what we like! :twisted: :biggrin

    Anyone?
     
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  2. Bluerinse
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    Bluerinse Exabyte Poster

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    Yes exclude them, also you can of course reserve IP addresses for nodes that always need the same IP.
     
    Certifications: C&G Electronics - MCSA (W2K) MCSE (W2K)
  3. zimbo
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    zimbo Petabyte Poster

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    i came across this and there is no mention of excluding just reservation...

    so if i have servers on 192.168.1.1-192.168.1.5 i should start the range from 1 to 254 and exclude 1-5? Or in the exam will MS turn to me in say NO start at 6 and finish at 254? :blink
     
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  4. Bluerinse
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    Bluerinse Exabyte Poster

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    Guess they forgot :rolleyes:

    From TechNet..

    from TechNet
     
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  5. zebulebu

    zebulebu Terabyte Poster

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    I'm not sure on this one myself TBH!

    In the real world, provided your network admins are worth their salt, they will be able to grasp concepts like 'routers & switches are x.x.x.1-x.x.x.10, servers are x.x.x.11-x.x.x.20, printers are x.x.x.21-x.x.x.40 and clients are x.x.x.41-x.x.x.150 for instance, so it is perfectly sensible to start your scope from x.x.x.41.

    However, in a lot of places, you can't rely on people being lucid enough to remember this, so I've seen scopes from x.x.x.1-x.x.x.254 with reservations pre-inserted.

    You'd think that it wouldn't matter, but to be honest its ages since I did 70-216 so can't really remember what sort of slant they put on the questions!
     
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  6. Bluerinse
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    Bluerinse Exabyte Poster

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    I believe you can exclude the IP addresses anywhere in the defined scope, meaning the beginning , like you site, the middle or even the end.
     
    Certifications: C&G Electronics - MCSA (W2K) MCSE (W2K)
  7. zimbo
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    zimbo Petabyte Poster

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    so excluding is the *PRACTICE* MS want.... :rolleyes: i hope we right!:oops:
     
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  8. Bluerinse
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    Bluerinse Exabyte Poster

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    Zimbo, you have to understand what Microsoft are testing you on. They are not trying to find out whether you understand DHCP, they are testing you on whether or not you know how to configure *their* software.

    Now think about this from their perspective. They have designed this nice little feature in DHCP where an administrator can exclude an IP address or a range of IP addresses. They will want to know whether or not you are aware of this functionality, so their questions will reflect their product. That is why people think there is a Microsoft way and the real world way. There isn't, it's just the exams are designed to make sure you know all the bells and whistles regardless of whether or not you chose to use them in the real world. In my book, that is fair enough.

    If a question mentions exclusions and allocating fixed IP addresses, they will want you to go for the answer that contains the exclusions.

    The questions may be ambiguous, and try to trick you into answering reservations instead of exclusions or vice versa. So know the differences and in what circumstances you would use them and you will be good to go.
     
    Certifications: C&G Electronics - MCSA (W2K) MCSE (W2K)
  9. zimbo
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    zimbo Petabyte Poster

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    thanks pete! Lets see if i got the two correct... exclusion is excluding a range of IP's where as reservations is making sure a certain hardware device gets the same IP all the time right? :D
     
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    WIP: M.Sc - Computer Forensics
  10. Bluerinse
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    Bluerinse Exabyte Poster

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    Yes 8)
     
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  11. zimbo
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    zimbo Petabyte Poster

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    i went ahead and did this on my lab but not sure if because im running vmware the outcome will different and i just wanted to ask one more thing but i think i know the answer...

    my router (gateway) uses 192.168.1.1 and my servers are on 2-6 (static).... so my range excluded is 192.168.1.1 - 192.168.1.6 - So have i finally got my head around this little problem? Look right, right? :biggrin
     
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  12. Bluerinse
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    Bluerinse Exabyte Poster

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    Yup, looks good to me Zim :biggrin
     
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  13. zimbo
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    zimbo Petabyte Poster

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    Thanks again pete!:biggrin
     
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  14. r.h.lee

    r.h.lee Gigabyte Poster

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    zimbo,

    Go the extra step further and mention that the _IN_cluded range of 192.168.1.7 -> 192.168.1.254 with subnet mask 255.255.255.0 :)
     
    Certifications: MCSE, MCP+I, MCP, CCNA, A+
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  15. zimbo
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    zimbo Petabyte Poster

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    sorry mate little confused what you getting at? :oops:
     
    Certifications: B.Sc, MCDST & MCSA
    WIP: M.Sc - Computer Forensics
  16. r.h.lee

    r.h.lee Gigabyte Poster

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    zimbo,

    Just reminding you the IP range that you'd need to create the scope for your network, that's all.
     
    Certifications: MCSE, MCP+I, MCP, CCNA, A+
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