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CWNA is on the Top 10 list of entry level IT certifications

Discussion in 'Other IT certifications' started by David Coleman, Nov 2, 2006.

  1. David Coleman

    David Coleman Bit Poster

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    Hot off the press from the November, 2006 issue of Certification Magazine:

    CWNA is on the Top 10 list of entry level IT certifications:

    1. Certified Wireless Network Administrator (CWNA) :D

    2. Cisco Certified Network Associate (CCNA)

    3. CompTIA A+

    4. CompTIA Network+

    5. CompTIA Security+

    For more information follow this URL:

    Certification Magazine Top 10 Lists Article
     
  2. zimbo
    Honorary Member

    zimbo Petabyte Poster

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    hmm that is interesting! Has wireless taken off that well in the uk?
     
    Certifications: B.Sc, MCDST & MCSA
    WIP: M.Sc - Computer Forensics
  3. Baba O'Riley

    Baba O'Riley Gigabyte Poster

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    Not where I work. If they knew I used wi-fi when working from home they'd have kittens. Something about the "inherent insecurity" of wireless.:dry

    On the other hand, I think there is both a big corporate and domestic wireless user base in the UK. The only thing we're a little short of is public Wi-Fi hotspots (unless you want to pay over £5 per hour which I think is a bit on the much side).
     
    Certifications: A+, Network+
    WIP: 70-270
  4. Bluerinse
    Honorary Member

    Bluerinse Exabyte Poster

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    David, I realise that you have a vested interest in the CWNA but from your link I cannot work out how you can say it's #1

    A quote from your link..

    :rolleyes:
     
    Certifications: C&G Electronics - MCSA (W2K) MCSE (W2K)
  5. David Coleman

    David Coleman Bit Poster

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    Good point Bluerinse.... I missed that completely! I edited my post. CWNA is in the TOP 10 of entry level certs!:oops:
     
  6. David Coleman

    David Coleman Bit Poster

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    Security is always the #1 topic when it comes to wireless networking. It has been my experience that large businesses that forbid wireless at the workplace have their head in the sand. Most companies have wireless and do not even know it. (Rogue devices). In the enterprise it is much better to have control over the wireless infrastructure and deploy a wireless IDS. Mobility = Productivity.:biggrin

    As far as you having wireless at home, every company should implement a "remote access wireless policy" whether thwy have Wi-Fi deployed in the enterprise or not.
     
  7. Bluerinse
    Honorary Member

    Bluerinse Exabyte Poster

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    No worries - thanks!

    I took the liberty of editing the thread title for you to reflect the amendment.
     
    Certifications: C&G Electronics - MCSA (W2K) MCSE (W2K)
  8. simongrahamuk
    Honorary Member

    simongrahamuk Hmmmmmmm?

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    I have to admit that is one cert that really interests me.

    Perhaps someday......
     
  9. zebulebu

    zebulebu Terabyte Poster

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    Amen. Working in security, I have to say this is the first job I've ever had where I haven't discovered a rogue WAP within the first six months. I perform a sweep every two months and haven't found any yet - woe betide the person responsible for the first one found!
     
    Certifications: A few
    WIP: None - f*** 'em
  10. Baba O'Riley

    Baba O'Riley Gigabyte Poster

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    Do you mean allowing home Wi-Fi access or disallowing it?

    Zeb, is it usually IT types that plant the rogue WAPs or your normal users? I'm surprised it's that common. Were the ones you've found for malicious reasons or was it just some dozy exec who wanted to be able to use his laptop on his leather sofa instead of his desk?
     
    Certifications: A+, Network+
    WIP: 70-270
  11. zebulebu

    zebulebu Terabyte Poster

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    Babs

    Its a real mixture, depending on the environment I've worked in. For instance, I found that whenever I was called in to consult in the city, unsanctioned WAPs were rife - one place I was called in to look at I found seven in 45 minutes with Kismet - only one of which the user had bothered to make a rudimentary attempt at cloaking by not broadcasting the SSID. This is despite the fact these tw@ts were all informed of the company AUP which expressly forbade Wireless, even for IT staff. I think it was one of those 'who are you to tell me what to do, I earn 100k a year, I'll do what I like'.

    other places, you usually tend to find that they're installed either by the IT department, BY the IT department for a mate in Marketing or, more problematically, by a geek 'fifth columnist' (someone in a non-technical role who thinks they have technical knowledge). This third kind is often responsible for serious security breaches as they do stupid things like try and find their way round proxy servers, try using instant messengers and, of course, install WAPs that they bought from PC World.
     
    Certifications: A few
    WIP: None - f*** 'em
  12. David Coleman

    David Coleman Bit Poster

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    The thing things I recommend for a "remote access" Wi-Fi policy are:

    1) IPSec VPN
    2) Personal firewall
    3) Consider deploying a wireless policy enforcement siftware such as Air Defense Personal:

    http://www.airdefense.net/products/adpersonal/index.php


    Most rogues are not malicious and are usually installed by end-users. That being said, they are still dangerous and malicious rogues are becoming more commonplace. Medium size businesses often discover rogue devices in the dozens. I know of one situation at a hospital here in the states where hundreds were discovered.
     
  13. Baba O'Riley

    Baba O'Riley Gigabyte Poster

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    Thanks guys.:thumbleft
     
    Certifications: A+, Network+
    WIP: 70-270
  14. Wassup

    Wassup Byte Poster

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    mmmm, another cert makes it onto the "to-do" list
     
  15. Boycie
    Honorary Member

    Boycie Senior Beer Tester

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    Wishlisted :)
     
    Certifications: MCSA 2003, MCDST, A+, N+, CTT+, MCT
  16. wagnerk
    Highly Decorated Member Award

    wagnerk aka kitkatninja Moderator

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    By the time I get round to doing a cert for wireless, I'll have a choice: the CWNA or Comptia's Wireless+ (when they release it) :)

    -Ken
     
    Certifications: CITP, PGCert, BSc, HNC, LCGI, PTLLS, MCT, MCITP, MCTS, MCSE, MCSA:M, MCSA, MCDST, MCP, MTA, MCAS, MOS (Master), A+, N+, S+, ACA, VCA, etc... & 2nd Degree Black Belt
    WIP: PGDip
  17. zimbo
    Honorary Member

    zimbo Petabyte Poster

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    Wireless+?? I thought they adandoned all plans for that! Are you aware of Wireless# from CWNP - its the entry level wireless cert that is the reason wireless+ didnt make...
     
    Certifications: B.Sc, MCDST & MCSA
    WIP: M.Sc - Computer Forensics
  18. wagnerk
    Highly Decorated Member Award

    wagnerk aka kitkatninja Moderator

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    Yeah, I'm aware of it. Comptia in the last couple of months sent out a survey to people who get their newsletter, about the possiblity of whether or not we'd we would like to see either a Wireless+ cert or see wireless technology integrated into the A+.

    Majority of people opted for a separate Wireless cert (inc myself), so at the moment we're just waiting to see what happens there.

    -ken
     
    Certifications: CITP, PGCert, BSc, HNC, LCGI, PTLLS, MCT, MCITP, MCTS, MCSE, MCSA:M, MCSA, MCDST, MCP, MTA, MCAS, MOS (Master), A+, N+, S+, ACA, VCA, etc... & 2nd Degree Black Belt
    WIP: PGDip
  19. zimbo
    Honorary Member

    zimbo Petabyte Poster

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    Ok then consider this:

    Comptia Wireless+ - exam price: £130-£150+
    CWNP Wireless# - exam price: $125.00

    Both (assuming W+ will be) are life long certs... so you do the maths which is worth more if you in the wireless field considering the CWNA is the next wireless cert up from Wireless#
     
    Certifications: B.Sc, MCDST & MCSA
    WIP: M.Sc - Computer Forensics
  20. wagnerk
    Highly Decorated Member Award

    wagnerk aka kitkatninja Moderator

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    Regardless of the price of a cert, it also boils down to the choice of the individual.

    You're currently doing a BSc full-time, I believe. Why don't you do it part-time? It's cheaper. Why a BSc, why not the BA version of the course?

    Also, take it from the point of different companies/individuals. The majority of people in IT have heard of Comptia and CWNA, but CWNA are relatively the "new kids on the block" compared to Comptia. If the majority of companies can't/won't keep up to date with new certs from 1 vendor (eg Microsoft), what would make a company keep up to date with new vendors/test providers.

    I'm not here to back Comptia with their pricing and neither am I here to bash CWNA, as both companies are high in my estimation.

    Oh by the way the CWNA is only valid for 3 years, only the Wireless# is valid for life.

    -ken
     
    Certifications: CITP, PGCert, BSc, HNC, LCGI, PTLLS, MCT, MCITP, MCTS, MCSE, MCSA:M, MCSA, MCDST, MCP, MTA, MCAS, MOS (Master), A+, N+, S+, ACA, VCA, etc... & 2nd Degree Black Belt
    WIP: PGDip

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