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CV and next opportunity

Discussion in 'Employment & Jobs' started by DapperDan, Aug 13, 2008.

  1. DapperDan

    DapperDan Nibble Poster

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    Hi everybody,

    This is my first post here. Just wanting some constructive criticism on my CV if possible. Do get calls from recruiters every other day, but there are the odd quiet periods.

    I have been looking to leave my current job for the past 18 months. Had five interviews in that time, but the issue was experience. From interview feedback given, I seemed very willing and capable to learn what is needed to do the job. Just that they need someone to 'hit the ground running' so to speak.

    Been in my current job for nearly 8 years since leaving university. It is mainly 1st / 2nd line support, but I want to move into a more network admin / server admin role. I suppose one of the reasons why I have stayed there so long is because I wanted to make myself known to the infrastructure department. But it hasn't worked out as they have always employed externally. That and the fact that the people I work with are sound!

    Where I am employed is large IT department, so you do tend to get pigeon-holed somewhat. The infrastructure dept. do all the user accounts in AD, Windows 2003 server configurations and MS Exchange 2003. The service desk does what you would normally expect an IT service desk to do. They would not dare let us loose on a server! And I could not tell you the reason why.

    I have managed to get a little experience in some of the technologies mentioned above by being shown them by an ex colleague at his new place of work on some weekends. I learnt a fair bit just by him letting me get to grips with it all which I appreciated. Coupled with studying the 70-290, I think I am on the right track.

    Thanks in advance!

    D.
     

    Attached Files:

    Certifications: ITIL v3; A+, Network+
  2. -Mercury-

    -Mercury- Byte Poster

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    Hi Dan and welcome!

    I had a look over your CV and it looked really good mate. I'm sure some of the other members who have more experience with applying for jobs than myself will be able to give you some good tips.

    Good luck!
     
    Certifications: MCSA|MCDST|A+|Net+
    WIP: CCENT
  3. drum_dude

    drum_dude Gigabyte Poster

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    I tweaked it mate - it's not perfect but at least it doesn't look like a CV from the resume wizard - should get you on the right track!

    P.S. don't open sentences with words such Performing or designing cos' it makes you sound like the indian call centre chap from Fone Jacker...LOL If describing your current job the opening word 9 times out of 10 should end in "e" such as provide, create, ensure etc etc. For past jobs it should end with "ed" , provided, created, designed blah blah!
     

    Attached Files:

    Certifications: MCSA , N+, A+ ,ITIL V2, MCTS
    WIP: MCITP 2008 Ent Admin, Server Admin, Exchange 2010, Lync 2010, CCNA & VCP5
  4. Qs

    Qs Semi-Honorary Member Gold Member

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    I am looking for a lookadeteuv. :p

    Sorry... had to.

    I agree with the previous comments. The CV is basically fine. If you require a decent site with tips on how to improve your CV then http://www.cvtips.com/ is a good place to start.

    Hope this helps :)

    Qs
     
    Certifications: MCT, MCSE: Private Cloud, MCSA (2008), MCITP: EA, MCITP: SA, MCSE: 2003, MCSA: 2003, MCITP: EDA7, MCITP: EDST7, MCITP: EST Vista, MCTS: Exh 2010, MCTS:ServerVirt, MCTS: SCCM07 & SCCM2012, MCTS: SCOM07, MCTS: Win7Conf, MCTS: VistaConf, MCDST, MCP, MBCS, HND: Applied IT, ITIL v3: Foundation, CCA
  5. DapperDan

    DapperDan Nibble Poster

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    Many thanks for the comments people.

    drum_dude - Cheers for that. Reading back over my original CV, there wasn't much distinction between what I currently do and what I did in the past.

    At least now I am armed with a decent CV and a covering letter (which my mum helped me write...lol)! What do you think to my covering letter? The letter is quite generic because as you guys know, we tend not to know the company who we're applying to when gone through a recruiter. I would normally add a tiny bit more in the letter about the company itself if I was applying direct.

    Cheers again.

    D.
     
    Certifications: ITIL v3; A+, Network+
  6. drum_dude

    drum_dude Gigabyte Poster

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    It's well written but the content is not to good. You've reapeted what is already on your CV, for instance, your current responsibilities. Just describe briefly what it is you do at this moment.

    You don't mention SLAs or time management or how you achieve or exceed SLA targets. There is no mention of the "customer" either - you need to emphasise who it is that you provide a service to and what level service you can provide - including past positive feedback. DON'T USE THE WORD "USER"...it's near enough a swear word these days - refer to "users" as "customers". I disagree with this myself, but these middle-management types seem to love it.

    No need to mention that you are "suitable" for a role, at this point in time you don't really know what the role consists of - only what an agent or short job description has told you.

    I'd be very wary of using the following: My written skills are effective and well practised. We're not all well versed in english but a hiring manager may pick out mistakes on your letter that would say otherwise.

    Keep your letter to one page and gear it towards YOU providing a service to your customers with an emphasise on how that all ties in with your IT experience, time management skills and your understanding of SLAs. Couple of sentences on "on-going" professional development, working as a team or as an individual should be tossed into the mix too. Avoid bullet points as it is a waste of space on a covering letter.
     
    Certifications: MCSA , N+, A+ ,ITIL V2, MCTS
    WIP: MCITP 2008 Ent Admin, Server Admin, Exchange 2010, Lync 2010, CCNA & VCP5
  7. Arroryn
    Honorary Member

    Arroryn we're all dooooooomed

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    Hi Dan

    Had a gander at the CV. The content looks good - the 'introductory' part at the start - your 'about me' - was a little confusing to read as they were a series of short sharp statements as opposed to full sentences. Because the references are more like in the third person as opposed to the first person, I found myself looking up to the top of the CV, just to reaffirm you were talking about you.

    A quick question also - are you looking to stay in the same industry (and are you based at the main offices?) Law seems like a good sector to remain in for the time being. If you're looking to make the step up to Sysadmin, you might want to see what some of the smaller firms are offering with regards to IT support vacancies - with a firm the size of yours, I can see how you would be pigeon-holed - especially if you work at the head office! And the rate of growth of some of the smaller firms would definitely mean that the the work you were doing held a high level of interest.
     
    Certifications: A+, N+, MCDST, 70-410, 70-411
    WIP: Modern Languages BA
  8. Arroryn
    Honorary Member

    Arroryn we're all dooooooomed

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    Okay, I had a re-read, and made some of my own edits - but it's only advice. My amends and comments are highlighted red :)
     

    Attached Files:

    Certifications: A+, N+, MCDST, 70-410, 70-411
    WIP: Modern Languages BA
  9. DapperDan

    DapperDan Nibble Poster

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    Cheers Arroyn and drum_dude for your comments. With regards to the introductory part, I was told it’s more a personal preference if you write it in the third person or in the first person. To me, it seems more personal if I use the word ‘I’. But I decided to write it in the third person.

    I don’t mind really what sector I’m in to be honest. I have said the same thing – If I was in a smaller firm (whether that be a law firm or otherwise), I feel I’d get exposed to so much more. Yes, I am based at the head office.

    With my covering letter, I can now see where it needs a bit of work.

    drum_dude - I've done a quick re-write taking into account some of the points you made. Feels like I could still sell myself a little more with a couple of sentances, but let me know what you think when you have the time.

    Again, many thanks. This is much appreciated.

    D.
     

    Attached Files:

    Certifications: ITIL v3; A+, Network+
  10. westernkings

    westernkings Gigabyte Poster

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    Have you tried using a program like InDesign to write your CV ? I used to be a graphics designer and one of the things I found that even though I no longer did graphics design, the styled CV made me stand out from the rest.

    PDF's instead of word for example, Adobe garamound instead of Times New Roman, Helvetica instead of Ariel or Tahoma. Dark Blue text Serifed for bodies of text and Sans for Headings, Mixtures of Bold and Regular too for headings.

    FurtherEducation for example. I attached mine for some constructive criticism, I have had a lot of success with it though when I first left college, got about 7 interviews after redesigning it.

    Page1

    Page2

    Sorry for the dodgy watermarks, I had to convert it from PDF so I could edit it as I'm at work. Censored it abit.
     
    Certifications: MCITP:VA, MCITP:EA, MCDST, MCTS, MCITP:EST7, MCITP:SA, PRINCE2, ITILv3
  11. Arroryn
    Honorary Member

    Arroryn we're all dooooooomed

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    With the credit crunch the way it is, selecting an 'impervious as possible' sector would be best bet. As your firm is full service, then as they handle recoveries-type work, my guess is they're going to be kept busy for the time being - especially as transactional and property work is taking a downturn (heard DLA have started laying off staff). A smaller firm that is still full-offer would possibly be a good long term learning prospect for you. I'm mainly yapping about staying in law as it seems to me to be a challenging sector which is going to be quite resistant to any downturn in the economy - let's face it - when are lawyers going to be not needed? :biggrin

    How about a few of these? (not 100% sure of what you want the next challenge to be or your salary requirements, so stabbing around in the dark a little ^.^)

    Helpdesk Manager

    Systems Engineer

    Technical Support Analyst
     
    Certifications: A+, N+, MCDST, 70-410, 70-411
    WIP: Modern Languages BA
  12. Qs

    Qs Semi-Honorary Member Gold Member

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    Just had a look at those two pages. I'm very impressed actually. I was so sure that it would look odd and out of place that its surprised me as to how good it is.

    Well done, good suggestion.

    Qs
     
    Certifications: MCT, MCSE: Private Cloud, MCSA (2008), MCITP: EA, MCITP: SA, MCSE: 2003, MCSA: 2003, MCITP: EDA7, MCITP: EDST7, MCITP: EST Vista, MCTS: Exh 2010, MCTS:ServerVirt, MCTS: SCCM07 & SCCM2012, MCTS: SCOM07, MCTS: Win7Conf, MCTS: VistaConf, MCDST, MCP, MBCS, HND: Applied IT, ITIL v3: Foundation, CCA
  13. DapperDan

    DapperDan Nibble Poster

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    That definitely makes sense. Quite a few of the guys who have left our department have left for other law firms. Even one law firm in particular has about 3-4 of our guys who used to work here.....lol! And they haven't looked back as I do keep in touch with some of them. Learning loads more and doing more server admin.

    Yeah, I know about DLA. Even here they let go a few of their staff in the Conveyancing department, but it hasn't spread to the admin / support departments (HR, IT, Accounts, Facilities). These departments have only been given a freeze on recruitment indefinitely. Everywhere else in the firm seems to be hiring as normal. I suppose since the main source of business is law, recruitment will be as normal from that standpoint.

    Those job examples are great. Definitely looking to do a more 3rd line role (or a role that incorporates 1st / 2nd / 3rd that some IT techs at small orgs have to do). Not too fussed about field engineer work, but it isn't a problem to travel to other sites from time to time as that's what I do now. Supervisory responsibility wouldn't be a problem neither.

    D
     
    Certifications: ITIL v3; A+, Network+

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