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couple of question about N+ career paths

Discussion in 'Network+' started by tysfoot, Nov 11, 2008.

  1. tysfoot

    tysfoot Byte Poster

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    Hi, im new to this forum and would like some advice. Im Gary by the way :thumbleft

    For the last 4 years ive wanted to go to college and study to be a network engineer but because of high costs from places like computeach and because of my other work commitment ive not been able to do that.

    Then i came across compTIA A+ home study for a fraction of the cost.
    After completing this i would then want to do the N+

    All i want to ask is:

    Because im more of a hands on, out of the office person once ive completed the A+ i would idealy want a job somewhere in the industry, does this mean all is avliable to me at this point is helpdesk support or are there other avenues to start and go down


    Also, once ive completed the A+ would i need to be in the industry to study for the N+ or can you study this after the A+ as a home study.
    After completon of the N+ (if this happens, :eyecrazy) what jobs can i apply fr that dont include, any helpdesk support


    Just found this forum yesterday and ive found it very useful, if anyone can help i would be very grateful
     
    Certifications: A+
    WIP: MCDST, N+
  2. kevicho

    kevicho Gigabyte Poster

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    To be honest Certifications don't guarantee jobs (they are designed with work experience in mind), however they are a bonus to your CV, the best thing to do if you are looking to break into IT is (as you would with any other business) start from the bottom.

    To get these Jobs saying you have passed A+, you may even need to explain to some organisations or recruiters who haven't heard of it, what it is, and how it makes you suitable for the job, but also you also should emphasise your customer relation skills, your work ethic, your desire to learn (ie the self study) and how you can work well in a team.

    Most places will train you or assist you in training to improve your support skills, but the above qualities will help you more than say A+.
     
    Certifications: A+, Net+, MCSA Server 2003, 2008, Windows XP & 7 , ITIL V3 Foundation
    WIP: CCNA Renewal
  3. kevicho

    kevicho Gigabyte Poster

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    Following on from what i said before, nowadays in IT all roles involve levels of customer service, probably the least i would say is if you are part of a team of programmers, but if you go down a specific field you wont just magically go around installing networks with no experience.

    No reputable employer is going to hire a novice (this is what your CV will say with no experience) to do high end jobs, also there is fierce competition in IT, with many talented people.

    Hate to say this but if you are unprepared to work your way up maybe IT isnt the career (unless you have family who is an MD)
     
    Certifications: A+, Net+, MCSA Server 2003, 2008, Windows XP & 7 , ITIL V3 Foundation
    WIP: CCNA Renewal
  4. tysfoot

    tysfoot Byte Poster

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    Cheers, im not saying im unpreparred im just saying are there other routes to go down than the helpdesk support, this seems to be the way for everyone who wants to start and if this is the only route ill just have to bare it for how long it takes to get up the ladder
     
    Certifications: A+
    WIP: MCDST, N+
  5. dmarsh

    dmarsh Terabyte Poster

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    I started as a junior programmer straight from university, I know many other people that did the same, some from college, some with no formal training. I know others that stumbled into data munging and eventually DBA work, others that got into networking after a YTS aprenticeship with IBM, others who took data entry or support roles and worked up into system admin or business analyst positions.

    So many people in my generation managed to forge careers using quite varied and unconventional paths.

    Whats not clear to me nowadays is if this is indeed still possible, it appears to me that peoples careers are becomming far more ridgid.

    However that may just be my perception, it would be interesting to see what others think.

    Previous generations seemed to think little of having many varied jobs or careers.
     
    Certifications: CITP, BSc, HND, SCJP, SCJD, SCWCD, SCBCD, SCEA, N+, Sec+, Proj+, Server+, Linux+, MCTS, MCPD, MCSA, MCITP, CCDH

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