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connecting routers and switches

Discussion in 'Routing & Switching' started by isabox, Feb 7, 2008.

  1. isabox

    isabox New Member

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    Hi
    I have two 3640 routers, six 2960 switches and also nearly 12 small routers and hubs, then I have 3 Desktops and 4 laptops. I got the routers and switches from one of my friends, when he was moving from the country.

    I have some ccna books and I read them. So, I can connect to the routers and switches through console. But I don't know how to make a network. So,

    Does anyone know some tutorials or guides or books that will help me to connect my routers and switches, then also my routers to the internet. Actually I should say, that how to I make my own network. I need something that will explain me the installation procedure of a SOHO network.

    Thanks
     
  2. r.h.lee

    r.h.lee Gigabyte Poster

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    isabox,

    Which "ccna books" do you have?
     
    Certifications: MCSE, MCP+I, MCP, CCNA, A+
    WIP: CCDA
  3. hbroomhall

    hbroomhall Petabyte Poster Gold Member

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    Hi and welcome to CF!

    It rather depends on what you want to do. Do you want to use all that equipment as a home lab to help you pass the CCNA (say), or do you just want to network your machines together and connect them all to the Internet?

    If the former - then the combinations are huge.

    If the latter then you just need one switch/hub and a method of getting on the 'net.

    Harry.
     
    Certifications: ECDL A+ Network+ i-Net+
    WIP: Server+
  4. sunn

    sunn Gigabyte Poster

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    If this is for training purposes I’d suggest not connecting to the Internet. Treat the new network as an isolated lab. There are many ways to build a lab network, but they’ll vary depending on your objectives. A lab network will likely be built several times as you learn new material (i.e. CCNA objectives include: EIGRP; OSPF; Spanning Tree; etc…) each can have a unique setup (physical & logical configs).

    If you still want to connect to the Internet, you’ll have to decide on some sort of design. Nothing complicated, but depending on what services your ISP is providing, you may want to connect the ISP to a switch (hub) before a router. On the router, a specific interface config will be needed but details depend on what and how the ISP is providing the service.

    Hopefully you have a starting point.
     

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