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CompTIA Network+ or A+ before CCNA

Discussion in 'General CompTIA Certifications' started by SgtEarlHickey, Feb 19, 2011.

  1. SgtEarlHickey

    SgtEarlHickey Bit Poster

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    Which is the advisable one to take before going for CCNA? I know that A+ focuses more on physical aspects of computers and Network+ on the networking side. But some take A+ then get CCNA. So I'm a bit confused about this. Suggestions/answers will be highly appreciated.
     
  2. BosonMichael
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    BosonMichael Yottabyte Poster

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    I'd recommend passing A+ before Network+, and I'd recommend passing Network+ AND getting IT experience before the CCNA.
     
    Certifications: CISSP, MCSE+I, MCSE: Security, MCSE: Messaging, MCDST, MCDBA, MCTS, OCP, CCNP, CCDP, CCNA Security, CCNA Voice, CNE, SCSA, Security+, Linux+, Server+, Network+, A+
    WIP: Just about everything!
  3. SgtEarlHickey

    SgtEarlHickey Bit Poster

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    @BosonMichael -- Why did you say so man? Am i gonna need A+ in CCNA? coz what im only focusing is on the networking side but perhaps you're right. I also need to have background on physical troubleshooting, eh?
     
  4. greenbrucelee
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    greenbrucelee Zettabyte Poster

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    Because no one walks into a networking job as their first IT role. Networking has to be worked towards and generally you will start at the bottom fixing problems. You should be looking for entry level jobs so the A+, N+ and MCDST are the way to go and then you must have experience before going for the CCNA.

    The MCDST is due to be retired soon so you should go for the Vista and windows 7 certs instead of that.
     
    Certifications: A+, N+, MCDST, Security+, 70-270
    WIP: 70-620 or 70-680?
  5. Bluerinse
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    Bluerinse Exabyte Poster

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    Networking is about connecting physical devices together, more often than not, those devices are computers. The hardware, such as Network Interface Cards (NICs) in the computers is needed to enable networking to happen. Understanding how the NICs are implemented and how the various networking protocols are configured, the differences between USB and serial devices etc.. will help you get a rock solid foundation to build the rest of your networking knowledge on.

    I can guarantee you that even the best networking gurus, find themselves sat at a piece of hardware known as a computer for most of their day. You need to know the basic fundamentals of a computer before you move on to bigger and better things. The A+ is a great place to start.
     
    Certifications: C&G Electronics - MCSA (W2K) MCSE (W2K)
  6. BosonMichael
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    What the others said is absolutely correct. You're probably not going to be able to walk into a job "focusing on networking" without first having IT experience. Nor would an airline hire someone to fly their largest aircraft without first piloting other planes for thousands of hours.

    What I'm saying is not that you're going to need the A+ in CCNA. What I'm saying is that you don't need the CCNA right now... and that the A+ and Network+ are going to help you get to the next step so you CAN eventually become a network administrator - over time.
     
    Certifications: CISSP, MCSE+I, MCSE: Security, MCSE: Messaging, MCDST, MCDBA, MCTS, OCP, CCNP, CCDP, CCNA Security, CCNA Voice, CNE, SCSA, Security+, Linux+, Server+, Network+, A+
    WIP: Just about everything!
  7. SgtEarlHickey

    SgtEarlHickey Bit Poster

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    @BosonMichael -- What if I just take a Diploma Course for now in Network Administration? It will only take for 1 year and then another year for the On the Job Training..then after that, take the CCNA..How about that?
     
  8. SgtEarlHickey

    SgtEarlHickey Bit Poster

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    @BossonMichael -- One more thing..would it be a problem if I am graduate of Business Administration? I have my degree in Business Admin but I worked as a technical support representative right after graduation..so I am more inclined into networking..what can you say about that?
     
  9. BosonMichael
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    No. Neither education nor certifications are a replacement for real-world experience. You can get all the degrees and take all the courses and pass all the exams that you want, but most employers aren't going to hire you to do Cisco router administration if you don't have any IT experience.

    By all means, do what you will... I'm just trying to give you the employer's perspective. :)
     
    Certifications: CISSP, MCSE+I, MCSE: Security, MCSE: Messaging, MCDST, MCDBA, MCTS, OCP, CCNP, CCDP, CCNA Security, CCNA Voice, CNE, SCSA, Security+, Linux+, Server+, Network+, A+
    WIP: Just about everything!
  10. BosonMichael
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    No, that's not really a problem. My degree is in Chemistry, and it hasn't hurt my IT career any. However, I started out at the bottom, just like I am advising that you do. I started out as a field service tech, going out to client sites fixing PCs, printers, and on rare occasions, servers. I then got a job as a systems admin, administering servers and workstations. There, I got to assist the network admin with routers, switches, and firewalls, which eventually helped me to get a network admin job.

    One step at a time, Sergeant. :)
     
    Certifications: CISSP, MCSE+I, MCSE: Security, MCSE: Messaging, MCDST, MCDBA, MCTS, OCP, CCNP, CCDP, CCNA Security, CCNA Voice, CNE, SCSA, Security+, Linux+, Server+, Network+, A+
    WIP: Just about everything!
  11. demarrer

    demarrer Byte Poster

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    Check out the CCENT as a replacement for the N+ if you want to start understanding the network in more detail. Try and get a copy of the books or checkout the cisco/comptia websites to give yourself an idea of the level of study a depth the certificates go into. As the other guys say, the A+ is a great place to start if you are starting out and wanting to get your foot in the door.

    The biggest help I have found so far in my study is deciding what cert you are going for, get the exam booked and work towards that exam day from there.

    Good luck.

    :twisted:
     
    Certifications: A+, Security +, CCNA, CCSA
    WIP: music, (dreaming of) CCIE Security :D
  12. BosonMichael
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    I would disagree with this advice. The CCENT doesn't replace Network+, nor does it give "more detail" than Network+. The CCENT largely tests on your ability to configure and troubleshoot Cisco devices... which is not relevant to what you'll be allowed to do in an entry-level job.

    Just my opinion. :)
     
    Certifications: CISSP, MCSE+I, MCSE: Security, MCSE: Messaging, MCDST, MCDBA, MCTS, OCP, CCNP, CCDP, CCNA Security, CCNA Voice, CNE, SCSA, Security+, Linux+, Server+, Network+, A+
    WIP: Just about everything!
  13. greenbrucelee
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    Mine too but lets not get into that argument again :D
     
    Certifications: A+, N+, MCDST, Security+, 70-270
    WIP: 70-620 or 70-680?
  14. BosonMichael
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    That's why I'm pasting the "Just my opinion" disclaimer on everything. :p heehee!

    Behold!!!

    "Congrats on passing the exam! Just my opinion."

    "Welcome to the forums! Just my opinion."

    :twisted:
     
    Certifications: CISSP, MCSE+I, MCSE: Security, MCSE: Messaging, MCDST, MCDBA, MCTS, OCP, CCNP, CCDP, CCNA Security, CCNA Voice, CNE, SCSA, Security+, Linux+, Server+, Network+, A+
    WIP: Just about everything!
  15. greenbrucelee
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    yeah lol, you might get the 'thought policeman' on you if you don't. Maybe I shouldn't say that because the police know when your taking about them :D
     
    Certifications: A+, N+, MCDST, Security+, 70-270
    WIP: 70-620 or 70-680?
  16. SgtEarlHickey

    SgtEarlHickey Bit Poster

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    @BosomMichael -- Oki Doki! I think I got all my ducks in a row now. I really appeciate all your suggestions. Thank you very much! Till next time! ;-)
     
  17. BosonMichael
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    You're very welcome! I know you're eager to get to the CCNA, and in time, I'm sure you will. It sounds like you have the drive and desire to succeed! I wish you well in your career.

    EDIT: BosomMichael? hah! Don't tell my wife! :biggrin
     
    Certifications: CISSP, MCSE+I, MCSE: Security, MCSE: Messaging, MCDST, MCDBA, MCTS, OCP, CCNP, CCDP, CCNA Security, CCNA Voice, CNE, SCSA, Security+, Linux+, Server+, Network+, A+
    WIP: Just about everything!
  18. SgtEarlHickey

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    @BosonMichael -- Last question man.. I'm now working here in Asia but I'm going back to US maybe next year..just wanna know if my work experience here will be considered in the US...
     
  19. BosonMichael
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    I'm not sure I understand the question. Why wouldn't it be considered work experience?
     
    Certifications: CISSP, MCSE+I, MCSE: Security, MCSE: Messaging, MCDST, MCDBA, MCTS, OCP, CCNP, CCDP, CCNA Security, CCNA Voice, CNE, SCSA, Security+, Linux+, Server+, Network+, A+
    WIP: Just about everything!
  20. SgtEarlHickey

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    @BosonMichael -- I mean, let us say I work in an IT company here as an entry level computer technician. Then I go back to the US, say after 2 years, as a promoted IT professional. If I am going to apply for work there, will the employers count in my years of experience here to qualify for a job?
     

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