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Clone a domain profile?

Discussion in 'Software' started by zr79, Dec 18, 2009.

  1. zr79

    zr79 Byte Poster

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    Say i have pc1 and user1 logs into their domain(non romaing domain). Now their desktop loads up and has all their software, office etc and whatever is configured to work with the servers(mail and file servers) mainly.

    So if i want to setup and new pc but don't want to go through the task of installing and configuring all the companies software to work with the server, i thought i could somehow clone the pc1 HD and copy it over to pc2 and somehow create a new domain user so that pc2's domain prfile was eaxct the same as user1 pc1 profile, so if i could do this i would obvioulsy need to change some settings like computer name, cd key..

    hmmm anyone know a way to do this, kind of like rolling out a domain profile but have a unique user profile for each.
     
    Certifications: A+
  2. BrizoH

    BrizoH Byte Poster

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    I'd say you're best bet is to take an image of the existing machine.

    What I would do is:

    1. Configure Machine A exactly as required

    2. Copy the user profile you used above on Machine A to the Default User profile

    3. Run Sysprep on Machine A

    4. Use an imaging tool like Ghost or PartImage on Machine A to take an image

    5. Roll out this Image to Machine B/C/D etc

    This way each machine will have a unique SID, and each user that logs on to the machine will have the profile exactly as you configured

    Hope this helps
     
    Certifications: CCNA, CCNA Security
    WIP: CCNP
  3. zebulebu

    zebulebu Terabyte Poster

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    Yep - that's the way it's done.

    Out of interest zr - have you taken on a job where you've bitten off a bit more than you can chew? I've seen about six posts from you in the past week, and they're all basically just asking forum members to help you out at work. You want to be careful with that sort of thing - Googling for information on performing a specific taks is one of the steps any employer would expect you top be able to take to resolve an issue. Actually specifically asking people regularly how to do it may well be forwned on - and certainly won't help you learn troubleshooting skills yourself.

    I charge about £80 ph for private work nowadays BTW...

    :)
     
    Certifications: A few
    WIP: None - f*** 'em
  4. jk2447

    jk2447 Petabyte Poster Moderator

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    Absolutely as above, talking about certs, home labs or work is one thing but asking how to do something in a prod environment with no evidence of prior knowledge is a different matter. **Edit: as is asking questions that are obviously homework assignments (a pet hate of mine)

    £80ph, thats top dollar Zeb. I've read your posts and obviously you know a lot of stuff but what is it you do for a living if you don't mind me asking? You've probably said before but I only joined this year. Just wanna know what career path gets on that kinda wonga :eek: :biggrin I'm trying but I'm stuck on about £55 an hour less than that :lol: :oops:
     
    Last edited: Dec 18, 2009
    Certifications: BSc (Hons), HND IT, HND Computing, ITIL-F, MBCS CITP, MCP (270,290,291,293,294,298,299,410,411,412) MCTS (401,620,624,652) MCSA:Security, MCSE: Security, Security+, CPTS, VCP4, CCA (XenApp6.5), MCSA 2012, VCP5, VCP6-NV
  5. zebulebu

    zebulebu Terabyte Poster

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    LOL - I was being facetious - that's the rate I charge for small private jobs I do on an ad-hoc basis. I've spent the last eighteen months getting rid of all my private SME clients because I couldn't dedicate the time they wanted to them, they caused me too much grief and they weren't as fulfilling as my 'real' job. The £80 figure is now what I charge if anyone wants me to 'look at their PC' or 'find out why their wireless isn't working'. I do about one of those a month - if that. Private work is too demanding, and I don't need to do it for financial reasons - I'd rather spend my time volunteering.

    My 'real' job title is 'Senior Systems Engineer' - which basically means chief nerd - for the UK arm of a US-based company. I look after the entire infrastructure (ESX, AD, Exchange, Citrix, LAN, Firewalls, Server - the whole nine yards). It's awesome.
     
    Last edited: Dec 18, 2009
    Certifications: A few
    WIP: None - f*** 'em
  6. jk2447

    jk2447 Petabyte Poster Moderator

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    Ah totally understand, when its a small private job, by the time you've got there, petrol etc I suppose you need to charge more. I'm daft, I do it for free :eek: but I get work done on my house etc in return so not all bad.

    Your job sounds brilliant. To be in charge of it all, thats how architects are made I'm sure. The yanks know how to look after people most of the time in my experience too :biggrin Thanks for sharing 8)
     
    Certifications: BSc (Hons), HND IT, HND Computing, ITIL-F, MBCS CITP, MCP (270,290,291,293,294,298,299,410,411,412) MCTS (401,620,624,652) MCSA:Security, MCSE: Security, Security+, CPTS, VCP4, CCA (XenApp6.5), MCSA 2012, VCP5, VCP6-NV
  7. zebulebu

    zebulebu Terabyte Poster

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    No worries. The yanks do look after you financially, and developmentally, but they want their pound of flesh in return, believe me. My contract is basically a largely blank piece of A4 with 'We own your ass' written on it :biggrin
     
    Certifications: A few
    WIP: None - f*** 'em
  8. jk2447

    jk2447 Petabyte Poster Moderator

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    Ha ha you wouldn't want it any other way :biggrin Keep up the good (and exhausing) work 8)
     
    Certifications: BSc (Hons), HND IT, HND Computing, ITIL-F, MBCS CITP, MCP (270,290,291,293,294,298,299,410,411,412) MCTS (401,620,624,652) MCSA:Security, MCSE: Security, Security+, CPTS, VCP4, CCA (XenApp6.5), MCSA 2012, VCP5, VCP6-NV

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