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CCNA start

Discussion in 'General Cisco Certifications' started by RevoKha, May 16, 2010.

  1. RevoKha

    RevoKha New Member

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    Hi there

    I am new to this site, nice to meet you all

    Just got a couple of questions which i'm hoping some of you may be able to help me with

    I have a degree, but its in law, i am currently working in finance, nothing amazing, but its ok but its nothing to do in IT, now I do wish to go into IT, I toyed with the idea of doing a masters computer science conversion course but that would have only gotten me into programming which I do not want, i want to go into networking

    Is it feasible going ahead with the CCNA with my background, despite the lack of experience, the CCNA course will be in a london university

    I almost made the mistake of applying for a 6 day ccna course, what the hell is that about! lol

    Thanks
     
    Certifications: LLB
    WIP: CCNA
  2. Finkenstein

    Finkenstein Kilobyte Poster

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    Hello, and welcome to the forums.

    Certification is usually used to show what you already have experience in. Generally it isn't worth getting a cert on something you may not have any experience with. For example, if you aren't programming and troubleshooting Cisco routers on a daily basis, then you really have no professional need for a CCNA. If you were to get your CCNA and then hired for a job requiring that CCNA, you'd be way in over your head.

    If it is networking you want to get involved in, I'd recommend that you look into CompTIA's Network+ certification, however having no IT experience, you may want to even start with the A+ and build your skills from there.

    Hope this helps!
     
    Certifications: MCP, Network+, CCENT, ITIL v3
    WIP: 640-822
  3. TommyTee

    TommyTee Byte Poster

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    Not being funny but what is your IT background? if it's nothing or limited to just a hobby then the CCNA may scare you off completely and be too hard, although it's the lower end of the cisco certs it's not a walk in the park or an entry level cert in the traditional sense of the word, people with years of background in IT can have problems.


    It also can look a little suspicious as well having a cert like that without exp or qualifications in the same field, although doing it at a University over a longer period of time is definately a better way to go if you're new.

    If you're completely new to IT then an A+ would be your best bet.

    Sure if you're determined and being a smart lad with a law degree you should get ahead quickly if you put the work in
     
    Last edited: May 18, 2010
  4. michael78

    michael78 Terabyte Poster

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    There is no reason why you can't do a CCNA but I would suggest not in 6 days. CCNA is a good way into networking but you won't learn it cramming into 6 days. I would suggest doing CCNA at a collage over 1 year if possible. At the end of the day it's difficult to see a company giving you a job messing around with Cisco equipment without any knowledge so you have to get that knowledge from somewhere and doing a CCNA will give you that knowledge. There is no guarantee in IT that you will get a job at the end of it as experience does count for a lot as well.
     
    Certifications: A+ | Network+ | Security+ | MCP | MCDST | MCTS: Hyper-V | MCTS: AD | MCTS: Exchange 2007 | MCTS: Windows 7 | MCSA: 2003 | ITIL Foundation v3 | CCA: Xenapp 5.0 | MCITP: Enterprise Desktop Administrator on Windows 7 | MCITP: Enterprise Desktop Support Technician on Windows 7
    WIP: Online SAN Overview, VCP in December 2011
  5. BosonMichael
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    BosonMichael Yottabyte Poster

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    ...or any experience. Companies simply do not entrust the administration of their Cisco gear to people who have no experience in IT.

    Working towards network administration is a worthwhile goal, but it's not something you just jump right into. I'd recommend the same thing Finkenstein and Tommy recommended: get your A+, Network+, and MCDST certifications and get an entry-level IT job. Then work your way up the IT career ladder, certifying as you go: entry-level > desktop support > server administrator > network administrator. That way, your certifications will match up with your skills. Being overcertified for your experience level is not a good thing.

    Best of luck in your career!
     
    Certifications: CISSP, MCSE+I, MCSE: Security, MCSE: Messaging, MCDST, MCDBA, MCTS, OCP, CCNP, CCDP, CCNA Security, CCNA Voice, CNE, SCSA, Security+, Linux+, Server+, Network+, A+
    WIP: Just about everything!
  6. michael78

    michael78 Terabyte Poster

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    Real world doesn't work like that. But agree A+, Network+ and MCDST are a good starting point.
     
    Certifications: A+ | Network+ | Security+ | MCP | MCDST | MCTS: Hyper-V | MCTS: AD | MCTS: Exchange 2007 | MCTS: Windows 7 | MCSA: 2003 | ITIL Foundation v3 | CCA: Xenapp 5.0 | MCITP: Enterprise Desktop Administrator on Windows 7 | MCITP: Enterprise Desktop Support Technician on Windows 7
    WIP: Online SAN Overview, VCP in December 2011
  7. BosonMichael
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    BosonMichael Yottabyte Poster

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    You keep telling yourself that. The rest of us will continue to give tried-and-true advice that works.
     
    Certifications: CISSP, MCSE+I, MCSE: Security, MCSE: Messaging, MCDST, MCDBA, MCTS, OCP, CCNP, CCDP, CCNA Security, CCNA Voice, CNE, SCSA, Security+, Linux+, Server+, Network+, A+
    WIP: Just about everything!
  8. michael78

    michael78 Terabyte Poster

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    It might work for you and thats great but it's a case of everyone is different and we all work in different areas/counties that dictate opportunities open to us and paths we can take. Ideal world then yes would be nice to move up the ladder like that at a steady pace but it simply isn't the case for a lot of people and never will be.

    As for learning a CCNA in 6 days then yes I would say strongly don't do it as unless your a genius you won't take the info in and it would be a waste of money. Learning a CCNA at collage over a year then yes I don't see an issue with that and think it's a very good way of gaining a CCNA and being able to apply that knowledge in a working environment. Nothing will every beat having commercial experience but sometimes gaining that experience in your choosen area like CCNA is very hard so the next best thing is to gain knowledge yourself through study, home labs etc.
     
    Last edited: May 19, 2010
    Certifications: A+ | Network+ | Security+ | MCP | MCDST | MCTS: Hyper-V | MCTS: AD | MCTS: Exchange 2007 | MCTS: Windows 7 | MCSA: 2003 | ITIL Foundation v3 | CCA: Xenapp 5.0 | MCITP: Enterprise Desktop Administrator on Windows 7 | MCITP: Enterprise Desktop Support Technician on Windows 7
    WIP: Online SAN Overview, VCP in December 2011
  9. BosonMichael
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    BosonMichael Yottabyte Poster

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    It's not the point of whether it "works for me". It's whether employers will hire someone with no experience to administer Cisco routers, and I have encountered exactly ZERO companies that will. If you know of any, by all means, please share them.

    We're not really gonna do this again, are we, Sly? :rolleyes:
     
    Certifications: CISSP, MCSE+I, MCSE: Security, MCSE: Messaging, MCDST, MCDBA, MCTS, OCP, CCNP, CCDP, CCNA Security, CCNA Voice, CNE, SCSA, Security+, Linux+, Server+, Network+, A+
    WIP: Just about everything!
  10. michael78

    michael78 Terabyte Poster

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    Never said it was going to be easy as in this environment that we are in it's getting hard to get good jobs. To me it is how you get the cert that makes the difference. Certs are a good way to learn and give you a goal at the end of it. CCNA in six days then lets be honest chances are you aint going to learn much and no I wouldn't hire someone with no background in IT who done CCNA in 6 days. One year college course doing CCNA then yes you will learn it and I would as an employer consider hiring that person but yes if you were up against someone with experience then they would probably get the job but that's the same in most professions. And no I'm not going to have another long winded back and forth with you.

    To RevoKha take onboard all comments but at the end of the day only you can say what is best for your career and the path you want to take.
     
    Certifications: A+ | Network+ | Security+ | MCP | MCDST | MCTS: Hyper-V | MCTS: AD | MCTS: Exchange 2007 | MCTS: Windows 7 | MCSA: 2003 | ITIL Foundation v3 | CCA: Xenapp 5.0 | MCITP: Enterprise Desktop Administrator on Windows 7 | MCITP: Enterprise Desktop Support Technician on Windows 7
    WIP: Online SAN Overview, VCP in December 2011
  11. craigie

    craigie Terabyte Poster

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    Just to give my five cents.

    Work wouldn't let me near any of your clients Cisco Routers, PIX's or ASA's until I had done my CCNA.

    Now I'm on them nearly every day, today I have reconfigured 14 Site to Site VPN's after changing an internal LAN remotely.

    To the OP, if your not working in IT and just starting out, then I would recommend doing the N+ and MCDST.
     
    Certifications: CCA | CCENT | CCNA | CCNA:S | HP APC | HP ASE | ITILv3 | MCP | MCDST | MCITP: EA | MCTS:Vista | MCTS:Exch '07 | MCSA 2003 | MCSA:M 2003 | MCSA 2008 | MCSE | VCP5-DT | VCP4-DCV | VCP5-DCV | VCAP5-DCA | VCAP5-DCD | VMTSP | VTSP 4 | VTSP 5
  12. BosonMichael
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    BosonMichael Yottabyte Poster

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    Fair point... but you had 1) already gained IT experience, and 2) your employer was wanting you to start touching Cisco devices pending your CCNA. THAT is when the CCNA ought to be attempted, in my opinion... not when starting out from scratch.
     
    Certifications: CISSP, MCSE+I, MCSE: Security, MCSE: Messaging, MCDST, MCDBA, MCTS, OCP, CCNP, CCDP, CCNA Security, CCNA Voice, CNE, SCSA, Security+, Linux+, Server+, Network+, A+
    WIP: Just about everything!
  13. TommyTee

    TommyTee Byte Poster

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    When I had my CCNA way back before it expired and I had to redo it again, when I started at a company doing 1st/2nd line support, a mix of helpdesk and desktop and server admin what the company did was over a period of 6 months elevated my priviliges and access slowly to certain cisco devices in the network. I remember thinking I was being treated like a kid at first but now I totally respect that decision and if I ever get in charge of something I would do the same.

    Experiance is the best thing obviously but one thing i've found over the last 5 years is people can embelish their experiance, it's quite easy to just add things onto a CV to make it look better where as qualifications and certs can't be blagged unless the dopey employer doesn't check.

    My boss told me that he was interviewing someone once and the conversation went something like this:

    Boss: I see on your CV you have experiance in Exchange?
    Candidate: Yep that's right, i've been exposed to it almost daily at my previous job
    Boss: That's good actually as here we're ideally looking for someone to expand on our existing infrastructure
    Candidate: I should definately be able to help you there
    Boss: What version are you using at the moment?
    Candidate: <pause>... 2.. 2005 at the moment
    Boss: 2005?
    Candidate: yes

    hahah.
     
    Last edited: May 19, 2010

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