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CCNA Recertification

Discussion in 'General Cisco Certifications' started by michael78, Jul 31, 2007.

  1. michael78

    michael78 Terabyte Poster

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    Just a quick question I know you are meant to retake the CCNA exam every three years or so but if you don't do you loose you cert status and also does anyone retake it to keep their status or do you just say you have passed it on your CV and let it lapse and do employers care as long as you have passed it in the past.
     
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  2. BosonMichael
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    BosonMichael Yottabyte Poster

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    If you list that you're CCNA certified, and your certification is expired, then you're using the credential without Cisco's authorization. Additionally, if your employer wants verification from Cisco, Cisco will tell them you're simply not certified... which is more than enough to quickly land your CV in the trash can.

    If the certification is important enough for you to list on your CV, it's important enough for you to maintain.

    ...and yes, people DO maintain them. I've had to renew all of my Cisco certifications a couple of times over.

    To maintain your status, you either have to take the CCNA exam again, or you have to take any 642-level exam (unless they've changed it yet again). Check Cisco's site to be sure.
     
    Certifications: CISSP, MCSE+I, MCSE: Security, MCSE: Messaging, MCDST, MCDBA, MCTS, OCP, CCNP, CCDP, CCNA Security, CCNA Voice, CNE, SCSA, Security+, Linux+, Server+, Network+, A+
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  3. michael78

    michael78 Terabyte Poster

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    Ahh right bit of a bummer I would of liked to of done the CCNA in the future but it's not an area I would concentrate on so it's probably not worth me doing it.
     
    Certifications: A+ | Network+ | Security+ | MCP | MCDST | MCTS: Hyper-V | MCTS: AD | MCTS: Exchange 2007 | MCTS: Windows 7 | MCSA: 2003 | ITIL Foundation v3 | CCA: Xenapp 5.0 | MCITP: Enterprise Desktop Administrator on Windows 7 | MCITP: Enterprise Desktop Support Technician on Windows 7
    WIP: Online SAN Overview, VCP in December 2011
  4. dmarsh

    dmarsh Terabyte Poster

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    I've come to the same conclusion, many professionals struggle to see the value of certification let alone recertification.

    Other vendors have dropped recertification for just this reason.

    Its possibly different with Network support but I can't really see any value to recertification regarding developer exams.

    Just giving the certification a version number should suffice, the employers can then make their own mind up.
     
    Certifications: CITP, BSc, HND, SCJP, SCJD, SCWCD, SCBCD, SCEA, N+, Sec+, Proj+, Server+, Linux+, MCTS, MCPD, MCSA, MCITP, CCDH
  5. michael78

    michael78 Terabyte Poster

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    I agree that the route that Cisco have choosen for their certs has probably turned a lot of people off doing it. It's one of those certs that I feel would be good to have but not a vital point of my career. I think what all cert providers should do is either say like the MCSA is that your qualified as an MCSA in 2003 or that your qualified on version 1 or you gained your cert in 2007 and this way it allows employers to see how recent your certs are and take it from there.
     
    Certifications: A+ | Network+ | Security+ | MCP | MCDST | MCTS: Hyper-V | MCTS: AD | MCTS: Exchange 2007 | MCTS: Windows 7 | MCSA: 2003 | ITIL Foundation v3 | CCA: Xenapp 5.0 | MCITP: Enterprise Desktop Administrator on Windows 7 | MCITP: Enterprise Desktop Support Technician on Windows 7
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  6. ThomasMc

    ThomasMc Gigabyte Poster

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    But isn't that what the new generation Microsoft cert are like, am sure i over heard someone saying they had to renew there MCITP ever 3 years, or maybe i just picked him up wrong
     
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  7. michael78

    michael78 Terabyte Poster

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    I did hear that too I don't know if it was a rumor or fact but if it's true I think it's a step in the wrong direction and just a way for Microsoft to milk more money out of people. You should be certified on the system or app that you are tested on for life it's that simple in my book.
     
    Certifications: A+ | Network+ | Security+ | MCP | MCDST | MCTS: Hyper-V | MCTS: AD | MCTS: Exchange 2007 | MCTS: Windows 7 | MCSA: 2003 | ITIL Foundation v3 | CCA: Xenapp 5.0 | MCITP: Enterprise Desktop Administrator on Windows 7 | MCITP: Enterprise Desktop Support Technician on Windows 7
    WIP: Online SAN Overview, VCP in December 2011
  8. tripwire45
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    tripwire45 Zettabyte Poster

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    I let my CCNA lapse because I didn't have the time to study for the test and frankly, because I wasn't using those skill sets. Naturally, I dropped the CCNA from my certifications list (short though it may be) because once it lapses, you are no longer certified.

    Even though it's a pain, I can sort of see the value. After all, the technology changes pretty rapidly and being a CCNA on the version of IOS available in the year 2000 is a different thing than the version available now.
     
    Certifications: A+ and Network+
  9. BosonMichael
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    That's all well and good for Server OS administration... but routers are completely different. It does little good to say that you're "certified as a CCNA on IOS 10.3"... because you *shouldn't* be using IOS 10.3, and you *can* upgrade it, in most cases. On the other hand, you *can* still use Windows 2000 Server successfuly in an enterprise environment. Thus, if you don't stay current, your Cisco certification expires... as it well should.
     
    Certifications: CISSP, MCSE+I, MCSE: Security, MCSE: Messaging, MCDST, MCDBA, MCTS, OCP, CCNP, CCDP, CCNA Security, CCNA Voice, CNE, SCSA, Security+, Linux+, Server+, Network+, A+
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  10. michael78

    michael78 Terabyte Poster

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    I disagree with that, As you point out being certified in 2000 is fine as a company may use 2000 for a lot of years and so you could say whats the point in doing 2003 or 2008 when it comes out. Surely it's the same principle for routers, not every company will have the latest models and may well use old equipment and so why should you loose your status if because you don't want to learn the latest in's and out's of newer Cisco equipment. After 3 years do you suddenly loose your knowledge? There should be an indicator to say that you are certified on the 2007 exam and that way you could say be a certified CCNA 2007 Professional.
     
    Certifications: A+ | Network+ | Security+ | MCP | MCDST | MCTS: Hyper-V | MCTS: AD | MCTS: Exchange 2007 | MCTS: Windows 7 | MCSA: 2003 | ITIL Foundation v3 | CCA: Xenapp 5.0 | MCITP: Enterprise Desktop Administrator on Windows 7 | MCITP: Enterprise Desktop Support Technician on Windows 7
    WIP: Online SAN Overview, VCP in December 2011
  11. BosonMichael
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    BosonMichael Yottabyte Poster

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    I never said you shouldn't continue to upgrade your Microsoft certifications. The point is, Windows 2000 is the same today as it was back then. But routers, even older models, can be upgraded to a new version of the IOS... for free, even. There's very few to NOT upgrade the IOS on a router.

    Another point is... if I had a Windows 2000 infrastructure, I'd hire someone certified on Windows 2000. I'd *not* hire someone who refused to keep their Cisco certifications current... a lot of the stuff learned in 2000 on Cisco isn't particularly relevant today.

    Finally, take a look at how valued and respected Microsoft certifications are versus Cisco certifications. Not saying Microsoft's not worth getting - I'm a huge supporter. But Cisco certifications are certainly more valuable. In any case, I support Cisco's stance on requiring their certified individuals current. Guess we'll have to just disagree.
     
    Certifications: CISSP, MCSE+I, MCSE: Security, MCSE: Messaging, MCDST, MCDBA, MCTS, OCP, CCNP, CCDP, CCNA Security, CCNA Voice, CNE, SCSA, Security+, Linux+, Server+, Network+, A+
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  12. michael78

    michael78 Terabyte Poster

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    Michael, thats a totally ridiculous thing to say that Cisco are more valuable than Microsoft as they are very different to what they teach. Would you hire a CCNA over an MCSE for an exchange or AD job???

    Anyway as you say we will have to agree to disagree
     
    Certifications: A+ | Network+ | Security+ | MCP | MCDST | MCTS: Hyper-V | MCTS: AD | MCTS: Exchange 2007 | MCTS: Windows 7 | MCSA: 2003 | ITIL Foundation v3 | CCA: Xenapp 5.0 | MCITP: Enterprise Desktop Administrator on Windows 7 | MCITP: Enterprise Desktop Support Technician on Windows 7
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  13. BosonMichael
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    I never said I would. That'd make no sense.

    The reason that Cisco certifications are more respected than Microsoft's is because of Cisco's aggressive stance against braindumping and their recertification policies. I never said that Cisco certifications should be valued for an AD administrator...
     
    Certifications: CISSP, MCSE+I, MCSE: Security, MCSE: Messaging, MCDST, MCDBA, MCTS, OCP, CCNP, CCDP, CCNA Security, CCNA Voice, CNE, SCSA, Security+, Linux+, Server+, Network+, A+
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  14. michael78

    michael78 Terabyte Poster

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    You said they are more valued suggesting that the cert holds more value than Microsoft's certs, that's total rubbish. I'm sorry but to say that Microsoft are more lax on braindumps is frankly wrong as well. No cert provider is going to be happy about people braindumping thier certs.

    Anyways I think we have covered this enough now and will have to agree to disagree on the subject.
     
    Certifications: A+ | Network+ | Security+ | MCP | MCDST | MCTS: Hyper-V | MCTS: AD | MCTS: Exchange 2007 | MCTS: Windows 7 | MCSA: 2003 | ITIL Foundation v3 | CCA: Xenapp 5.0 | MCITP: Enterprise Desktop Administrator on Windows 7 | MCITP: Enterprise Desktop Support Technician on Windows 7
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  15. tripwire45
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    tripwire45 Zettabyte Poster

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    (Puts on Smod hat) Guys, is this an issue you really want to argue about?
     
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  16. dmarsh

    dmarsh Terabyte Poster

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    Well I can see there may be reasons for the CCNA, however I feel very strongy in general recertification is a bad thing.

    I hold five Sun certs that were hard earned, most of what I learnt will be relevant for 10 years probably, why should I expend more time, money and energy ? I also witnessed Sun remove their requirement for recertification which I think was exactly the right thing to do. The Sun certifications are hard to earn, earning them once should be enough. They are still in my mind widely respected even without recertification.

    As a developer and architect I must know MANY technologies, certifying on these technologies just once is a big challenge, as is developing the real world knowledge and experience which in general is not covered by the cert programs which only test basic use.

    Why would I want to continually spend time and money retesting on the basics of one tech ? This time and money could be better spent elsewhere, like doing real work for instance or trying to get back that much neglected social life !
     
    Certifications: CITP, BSc, HND, SCJP, SCJD, SCWCD, SCBCD, SCEA, N+, Sec+, Proj+, Server+, Linux+, MCTS, MCPD, MCSA, MCITP, CCDH
  17. dmarsh

    dmarsh Terabyte Poster

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    On a slightly different note the rarity of a cert in relation to the demand for that skill can give it value. Requiring recertification and expiring certs by definition will put some people off and remove some exisiting cert holders from the market, this in turn will increase their rarity. I'm not sure if relative rarity in itself should be seen as a good thing for a cert.

    The new MCA cert is indeed very rare, the fact that Microsoft are charging $10,000 for the privilege might somehow have something to do with this... :eek:

    I would argue that its likely going to be so rare it may well become irrelevant...
     
    Certifications: CITP, BSc, HND, SCJP, SCJD, SCWCD, SCBCD, SCEA, N+, Sec+, Proj+, Server+, Linux+, MCTS, MCPD, MCSA, MCITP, CCDH
  18. michael78

    michael78 Terabyte Poster

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    Sorry Trip your right it is getting a little daft appologies :oops: .
     
    Certifications: A+ | Network+ | Security+ | MCP | MCDST | MCTS: Hyper-V | MCTS: AD | MCTS: Exchange 2007 | MCTS: Windows 7 | MCSA: 2003 | ITIL Foundation v3 | CCA: Xenapp 5.0 | MCITP: Enterprise Desktop Administrator on Windows 7 | MCITP: Enterprise Desktop Support Technician on Windows 7
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  19. tripwire45
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    No worries, slypie. :)
     
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  20. BosonMichael
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    BosonMichael Yottabyte Poster

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    Uh... yes? Else, I'd not have responded. :blink
     
    Certifications: CISSP, MCSE+I, MCSE: Security, MCSE: Messaging, MCDST, MCDBA, MCTS, OCP, CCNP, CCDP, CCNA Security, CCNA Voice, CNE, SCSA, Security+, Linux+, Server+, Network+, A+
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