1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

CCNA or Comptia Network+

Discussion in 'Network+' started by benswip, Apr 15, 2009.

  1. benswip

    benswip Bit Poster

    14
    0
    12
    I understand CCNA is cisco, Comptia Network+ is neutral. But when you go out and look for a job, which one is easier to get yourself a job?
     
    Certifications: Comptia A+, Network+
    WIP: MCSA
  2. morph

    morph Byte Poster

    204
    3
    22
    dont run before u can walk - do the network + first and to be honest experience will get u a job more than cert :)
     
    Certifications: Network +, ITIL Foundation, CCENT, CCNA
    WIP: server/ccna security
  3. wagnerk
    Highly Decorated Member Award

    wagnerk aka kitkatninja Moderator

    10,831
    357
    341
    Getting a job is not all about certifications, certifications play a part but it's not the "be all and end all". Getting into 1st line support/your first job (judging by your previous posts) I would say disregard the Cisco certs for now, and concentrate on the A+, Network+ & the MCDST.

    I say this for several good reasons:

    1. The CCNA, like the majority of Cisco certs expire every 3 years.
    2. Even with the CCNA, 99% of employers/IT managers will not let you loose on the network infrastructure without previous experience &
    3. Not everyone uses Cisco kit.

    -Ken
     
    Certifications: CITP, PGCert, BSc, HNC, LCGI, PTLLS, MCT, MCITP, MCTS, MCSE, MCSA:M, MCSA, MCDST, MCP, MTA, MCAS, MOS (Master), A+, N+, S+, ACA, VCA, etc... & 2nd Degree Black Belt
    WIP: PGDip
  4. Gav

    Gav Kilobyte Poster

    447
    14
    27
    A+, Network+, then CCNA.

    You'd be silly to do it any other way!



    Check me out with my rhyming skills! 8)
     
  5. greenbrucelee
    Highly Decorated Member Award

    greenbrucelee Zettabyte Poster

    14,283
    254
    329
    No qualification or certification will get you a job. Infact having a high level cert like the CCNA without the on the job experience to go with it can go against you when applying for jobs.

    The CCNA is supposed to show your on the job experience maintaining and supporting cisco hubs & switches.

    The N+ is for people looking at getting into networking and requires very little experience or none at all.

    As said above certwise you should be doing A+,N+ and MCDST before anything else and perhaps the MCAS in Vista then when you have some decent experience then you can progress to other higher certs like MCSA,CCNA and MCSE.
     
    Certifications: A+, N+, MCDST, Security+, 70-270
    WIP: 70-620 or 70-680?
  6. benswip

    benswip Bit Poster

    14
    0
    12
    Thank you for your advice. I really appreciate and hope to discuss it more with you about it. I thought cert wasn't that important initially and I've applied many 1st line support jobs before, but I never got any response at all. That's why I decided to take some time to get certified before I apply for another one. But what worries me is not getting any jobs even after I get certified because all of the job adverts I saw never mentioned about comptia a+ or similar, but they did mention about MCP, MCSE, and CCNA. In that case, I think, to be more competitive, shouldn't I get more certs?
     
    Certifications: Comptia A+, Network+
    WIP: MCSA
  7. benswip

    benswip Bit Poster

    14
    0
    12

    I never worked in an IT position before. If qualification and certification will not get me a job, what should I do to set my foot into IT industry? Any advices will be much appreciated.
     
    Certifications: Comptia A+, Network+
    WIP: MCSA
  8. craigie

    craigie Terabyte Poster

    3,020
    173
    155
    Ben,

    If you are looking for a 1st Line Support type of role, you need to adapt your CV to be customer service focused. The reason for this is that most roles are 80% customer service and 20% IT knowledge.

    Even though you have been given some good advice from everyone. You don't have to start with the A+ and N+. If you prefer software and Microsoft materials, try the MCDST, then you could place on your CV studying towards MCDST.

    One more thing to realise, is that the job market is extremley competitive, so have a look at your CV and revamp it, as you need to read it and think would I give me an opportunity?
     
    Certifications: CCA | CCENT | CCNA | CCNA:S | HP APC | HP ASE | ITILv3 | MCP | MCDST | MCITP: EA | MCTS:Vista | MCTS:Exch '07 | MCSA 2003 | MCSA:M 2003 | MCSA 2008 | MCSE | VCP5-DT | VCP4-DCV | VCP5-DCV | VCAP5-DCA | VCAP5-DCD | VMTSP | VTSP 4 | VTSP 5
  9. greenbrucelee
    Highly Decorated Member Award

    greenbrucelee Zettabyte Poster

    14,283
    254
    329
    Look for trainee roles or 1st line roles (entry level) that require no experience but a willingness to train up.

    As said certs and quals can make you more attractive to an employer than someone who doesn't have any but nothing is garunteed. IT is very difficult to get into so selling yourself is very important.

    As Cragie said if you have any customer service experience then this can be very beneficial especially if your going into a support role.

    You could study for entry level certs like A+ and N+ and MCDST for that or study them and look for a role as an IT Tech with a small company.
     
    Certifications: A+, N+, MCDST, Security+, 70-270
    WIP: 70-620 or 70-680?
  10. morph

    morph Byte Poster

    204
    3
    22
    +1 for last 2 posts ;)
     
    Certifications: Network +, ITIL Foundation, CCENT, CCNA
    WIP: server/ccna security
  11. wagnerk
    Highly Decorated Member Award

    wagnerk aka kitkatninja Moderator

    10,831
    357
    341
    Professional certifications are there to reflect your job role and responsibilities and not to be used as a sub for experience.

    Entry level/1st tier certs would include the A+, Network+, the MCDST, MCTS Vista & the MCAS Vista, to be honest anything higher than that would be level 2 and 3. Alot of IT managers are now disregarding the higher level certs on people that do not have the experience to back the certs up.

    So yes, go for certs, however choose them properly...

    -ken
     
    Certifications: CITP, PGCert, BSc, HNC, LCGI, PTLLS, MCT, MCITP, MCTS, MCSE, MCSA:M, MCSA, MCDST, MCP, MTA, MCAS, MOS (Master), A+, N+, S+, ACA, VCA, etc... & 2nd Degree Black Belt
    WIP: PGDip
  12. craigie

    craigie Terabyte Poster

    3,020
    173
    155
    Wise words Ken.

    For me personally, the MCSA and MCSA:M are the right level for me currently. However, work set me a goal to obtain the MCSE and then I get a pay rise. Guess what I'm working towards 8)
     
    Certifications: CCA | CCENT | CCNA | CCNA:S | HP APC | HP ASE | ITILv3 | MCP | MCDST | MCITP: EA | MCTS:Vista | MCTS:Exch '07 | MCSA 2003 | MCSA:M 2003 | MCSA 2008 | MCSE | VCP5-DT | VCP4-DCV | VCP5-DCV | VCAP5-DCA | VCAP5-DCD | VMTSP | VTSP 4 | VTSP 5
  13. StormTHX

    StormTHX Byte Poster

    213
    4
    22
    It is very difficult to break into IT without experience - there I said it. I broke into IT after getting a tough blue-collar job loading trucks. I busted my butt and did a job that I couldn't stand for two years, but made sure that I was one of the best if not the best truck loader there was.

    I took some computer classes (that the company paid for to ready us for the paper-to-PC revolution in 1992) and didn't even know an IT department existed.

    There was an entry level position open and my reputation as a great truck loader helped me get that job in Computer Operations for $5.75 per hour with night shift pay in 1994! (Halloween was my first day)

    The moral of this book is that maybe you know of a great company in your area that will hire you for another position that you can bust your butt at and get into the IT department that way. It may take a couple of years, but maybe you will get some hands on with the applications from a user's point of view.

    Be nice and professional to the computer people - don't try to be little hacker and act like you know all about computers to them (this will make sure you never get in). Maybe you will have similar interests outside of work, like comic conventions or video games or sports - whatever just get on the right side of the computer people and let it work itself out.

    Stay positive!:thumbleft
     
    Certifications: MCDST, MCP (210), A+, ITIL Foundations
    WIP: Taking a break then onto MCSE
  14. osiris

    osiris Bit Poster

    20
    0
    12
    CompTIA certifications do not hold much weight in the UK and that is a fact. What you learn in A+ and Network+ should secure you a starter position, they probably will in the USA but not in the UK. However it is best to take Network+ before taking on CCNA. I got my Network+ in 2006 and my CCNA in 2007. I used Cisco routers and switches in a home lab.

    After I passed my CCNA I only applied for low paid positions with no success. What you need to understand is that the people working in the employment agencies do not really know much about IT, and have not studied for anything. They will always aim for people with previous experience, and will consider any previous experience in IT relevant it is all the same to them. If someone has been working on 1st Line support for 3 years with no Cisco experience or certifications, applies for a Junior Networking position - And you have just passed your CCNA and used Cisco routers/switches for your study etc, also apply for the same position they will consider them the better candidate. They will send the employer their CV and throw your one in the bin. At the end of the day their only concern is how much commission they are making, and they don't make much out of the junior positions anyway
     
    Certifications: CompTIA A+ Net+ CCNA MCP 70-270 70-290
    WIP: 70-291 to make MCSA
  15. greenbrucelee
    Highly Decorated Member Award

    greenbrucelee Zettabyte Poster

    14,283
    254
    329
    I totally disagree with you on what you say that compTIA certs don't hold much weight in the UK. They do, Microsoft certs are more desirable but it's people lack of knowledge like IT directors and managers that do not know about all the certs available. If an IT manager says they don't know about the A+ or whatever then it might be wise not to work for them as they probably have as much knowledge as a turd on a stick.

    It's funny you see it took me a long time to get any IT work but as soon as I got my A+ and even more so now the N+ and 70-271 I have so much work I am having to say no to it.

    I have worked for 8 years for the same company, yes I have been using computers in the job but as soon as they were aware I got my A+ and they (bosses) knew I was studying the N+ and MCDST they gave me the opportunity at configuring and setting up the servers and basically being in charge of the 7 servers in my department. We have software that is supported by an outside company, one of their engineers was here and was impressed with what I was doing so he gave me a job with his sideline business of re-furbishing and building PCs and servers.

    This is why I say the A+ is not a waste of time because I had my HND for 8 years before this all happened.
     
    Certifications: A+, N+, MCDST, Security+, 70-270
    WIP: 70-620 or 70-680?
  16. benswip

    benswip Bit Poster

    14
    0
    12
    Thank you so much, mates. You guys really gave me lots of insights otherwise I wouldn't even know what is going on out there. I hope comptia cert would help me to break into IT.
     
    Certifications: Comptia A+, Network+
    WIP: MCSA
  17. osiris

    osiris Bit Poster

    20
    0
    12
    I would not say gaining knowledge is a waste of time,but the fact is most employment agencies do not know (or care)about CompTIA. It is nonsense because they count as the elective for MCSA.
    Where do you live Carlisle? (Population 101,300 - 2001) I live in the South East (Population 8,000,645 -2001) slightly more populated with a bit more going on.
    I found after getting my A+ and Network+ that when I applied for starter positions, most of the agencies dealing with them had never heard of CompTIA. I have found people that do actually work in IT are all fully aware of CompTIA, but you have got to get past the agencies to get interviews. :biggrin
     
    Certifications: CompTIA A+ Net+ CCNA MCP 70-270 70-290
    WIP: 70-291 to make MCSA
  18. greenbrucelee
    Highly Decorated Member Award

    greenbrucelee Zettabyte Poster

    14,283
    254
    329
    Thats because most people who work in recruitment agencies are retards and wouldn't know the difference between a car and a bus until it hit them. Use to live in leeds twas exactly the same for me there.
     
    Certifications: A+, N+, MCDST, Security+, 70-270
    WIP: 70-620 or 70-680?
  19. osiris

    osiris Bit Poster

    20
    0
    12
    I have recently seen adverts 1st line support positions in London asking for MCSE and others asking for up to 3 years experience. There are plenty of people already working in 1st line with no certifications. The IT managers only see the CVs that the agencies send onto them them.
     
    Certifications: CompTIA A+ Net+ CCNA MCP 70-270 70-290
    WIP: 70-291 to make MCSA
  20. wagnerk
    Highly Decorated Member Award

    wagnerk aka kitkatninja Moderator

    10,831
    357
    341
    Yeah those adverts asking for MCSE for 1st line support are either still stuck on the rep of the paper MCSE or most likely that they really don't know what the MCSE is. If it's the later, I would be very hesitant on applying to those companies, if they don't know what the MCSE is how are they going to help you develop professionally? But that's just my opinion.

    -Ken
     
    Certifications: CITP, PGCert, BSc, HNC, LCGI, PTLLS, MCT, MCITP, MCTS, MCSE, MCSA:M, MCSA, MCDST, MCP, MTA, MCAS, MOS (Master), A+, N+, S+, ACA, VCA, etc... & 2nd Degree Black Belt
    WIP: PGDip

Share This Page

Loading...