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Career change

Discussion in 'Employment & Jobs' started by rabmerab, Mar 17, 2010.

  1. rabmerab

    rabmerab Bit Poster

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    Hi guys,

    I am a 39 years old. I was as an electronic engineer and consider a career switch to IT.
    I want to train to get MCSE.
    I am technically minded and I guess I am used to exams.
    Is there chance for me to get a job in IT at this age?
    Hope to hear your opinion.
    Cheers
    rabmerab

    :D
     
  2. westernkings

    westernkings Gigabyte Poster

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    It's a little late, not impossible, but you've kind of jumped on the tracks, years after the train left...

    As for MCSE? that's for people who work with Servers day to day, and not just rebooting them. It's for people who actively and in depth configure and use them. Which isn't you.
     
    Certifications: MCITP:VA, MCITP:EA, MCDST, MCTS, MCITP:EST7, MCITP:SA, PRINCE2, ITILv3
  3. supernova

    supernova Gigabyte Poster

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    Age shouldn't be a problem.

    However, its all about experience not certification.

    MCSE should only be taken by people who are already working as a administrator the audience profile is someone working as a admin for at least 12 months, 250+ PCs, multiple domains and multiple sites .

    If your not in IT then you'll probably have to start at the bottom and work up. I would look at the A+, N+, MCDST and entry level jobs. Dont be surprised if you have to take a wage lower than your current!!!!

    Due to the current market it isn't the easiest time to switch careers. There are experienced IT persons out there looking for jobs after redundancy.

    So don't give up your current job until you find something is my biggest recommendation.
     
    Certifications: Loads
    WIP: Lots
  4. BosonMichael
    Highly Decorated Member Award

    BosonMichael Yottabyte Poster

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    It's not too late. I've known people in their 50s make the switch to an IT career.

    That said, getting the MCSE right at square one would not be wise. The others are correct in that the MCSE is a certification that is recommended for people who have already been server admins for a year - not just in IT for a year, but actually administering servers. Start out with the A+, Network+, and MCDST for a good entry-level foundation.
     
    Certifications: CISSP, MCSE+I, MCSE: Security, MCSE: Messaging, MCDST, MCDBA, MCTS, OCP, CCNP, CCDP, CCNA Security, CCNA Voice, CNE, SCSA, Security+, Linux+, Server+, Network+, A+
    WIP: Just about everything!
  5. rabmerab

    rabmerab Bit Poster

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    I didn't work as IT technician but I dealing in computers since my teen.
    At one point, I did bought MCSE book and build small network to practise.
    08 years ago, I did passed City&Guilds certificate in PC maintenance, Networking, C++ programming and Web page design.
    Where I work, we got windows 2000 server and 06 computers. I do the network administration.
    I know how to install windows 2000 server and professional, set-up directory, an attended installation….

    I was working also on video over IP ( IP cameras and IP DVR).
    I guess I go mix knowledge of every thing and I need to specialise more in dept.
    You don't thing I got the basic to start a successful career.
    Thanks
     
  6. westernkings

    westernkings Gigabyte Poster

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    You have pretty mediocre knowledge base, but it's a base and something to build on. Try getting your head into a few more bits and bobs, try setting up some labs. Another thing that is going to hinder you, is your writing skills "Where I work, we got", if this is dyslexia then see what resources are around to help you at least begin conquering it as much as you can. It all goes to making you a more attractive prospect for an employer.
     
    Certifications: MCITP:VA, MCITP:EA, MCDST, MCTS, MCITP:EST7, MCITP:SA, PRINCE2, ITILv3
  7. danielno8

    danielno8 Gigabyte Poster

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    I think you should maybe have a read at what dyslexia is!
     
    Certifications: CCENT, CCNA
    WIP: CCNP
  8. BosonMichael
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    BosonMichael Yottabyte Poster

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    If you currently DO network administration, you don't have to "switch to an IT career"... aren't you ALREADY in IT? :blink
     
    Certifications: CISSP, MCSE+I, MCSE: Security, MCSE: Messaging, MCDST, MCDBA, MCTS, OCP, CCNP, CCDP, CCNA Security, CCNA Voice, CNE, SCSA, Security+, Linux+, Server+, Network+, A+
    WIP: Just about everything!
  9. rabmerab

    rabmerab Bit Poster

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    I work as electronic engineer and I do anything technical for the company. So to save money, instead of calling some one from outside I deal with it.
    It is not a big network. Windows 2000 server sand 6 PCs (windows XP, windows 2000 professional).
     
  10. rabmerab

    rabmerab Bit Poster

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    Any one got an idea about MCSE training provider who say "JOB GUARANTEED OR YOUR MONEY BACK IF YOU TRAIN WTH US".
    Is it too good to be true?
     
  11. westernkings

    westernkings Gigabyte Poster

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    RAB Listen to what we are telling you. YOU ARE NOT READY FOR AN MCSE, so stop looking for an easy way to gain it.
     
    Certifications: MCITP:VA, MCITP:EA, MCDST, MCTS, MCITP:EST7, MCITP:SA, PRINCE2, ITILv3
  12. BosonMichael
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    BosonMichael Yottabyte Poster

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    My point is... if you're doing network administration, you're already in IT.
     
    Certifications: CISSP, MCSE+I, MCSE: Security, MCSE: Messaging, MCDST, MCDBA, MCTS, OCP, CCNP, CCDP, CCNA Security, CCNA Voice, CNE, SCSA, Security+, Linux+, Server+, Network+, A+
    WIP: Just about everything!
  13. BosonMichael
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    BosonMichael Yottabyte Poster

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    Yes, it is probably too good to be true. Check your other thread.
     
    Certifications: CISSP, MCSE+I, MCSE: Security, MCSE: Messaging, MCDST, MCDBA, MCTS, OCP, CCNP, CCDP, CCNA Security, CCNA Voice, CNE, SCSA, Security+, Linux+, Server+, Network+, A+
    WIP: Just about everything!
  14. supernova

    supernova Gigabyte Poster

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    no offence, but that hardly meets the profile of the MCSE it doesnt even come close.

    Do yourself a favour follow the advice on the forum start in helpdesk and look at self studying A+, N+, MCDST, it will save you a lot of heart ache.

    I would also make sure its what you want to do!!!!!, because I see a post from last week from you on another board asking the same about a master degree in embedded systems and asking if you could get a job using that.
     
    Last edited: Mar 17, 2010
    Certifications: Loads
    WIP: Lots
  15. rabmerab

    rabmerab Bit Poster

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    Hi Bonson
    My main work is electronic and I do some IT stuff, even programming ( Visual basic, Visual C++, PHP, javascript).
    I don't think there is future in electronic with all the electronic devices come from China. So there is no design or development. The nice days are over now and I am looking for something challenging and to keep updating my knowledge.
    The wage is another issue. I work for a small company and for 5 years I just have 1 pay rise.
    Trust me, I should’ve done this long time ago and I hope it is not late to do so.
     
  16. rabmerab

    rabmerab Bit Poster

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    Don't worry, no offence what so ever.
    I think it was me about the embedded systems. I tired twice to start the course but my boss didn't let me off 1 day a week.
    I been always worried if I am running a big network and sod's laws kick in. It will be a big problem if for example all the network in school is down because there is a wearied problem that I can resolve.
    You know sometimes you get this problem which are behind logic and what ever you try to use logic to resolve the matter it doesn't help.
    So I didn't want to be in that situation by avoiding to work as network engineer.
    Last week, I was talking an old uni friend who is dealing with web hosting, servers and really big thing and he was telling me about this network diagnostic tools that you can use to find what is problem ever remotely.
    That make me change my mind and I thought to my self, it is not that wearied as I thought.
    I know my self I am hard working and can quickly learn new technology as long there is documentation and training.
     
  17. rabmerab

    rabmerab Bit Poster

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    Hi m8


    I think it was me about the embedded systems. I tired twice to start the course but my boss didn't let me off 1 day a week.
    I been always worried if I am running a big network and sod's laws kick in. It will be a big problem if for example all the network in school is down because there is a wearied problem that I can resolve.
    You know sometimes you get this problem which are behind logic and what ever you try to use logic to resolve the matter it doesn't help.
    So I didn't want to be in that situation by avoiding to work as network engineer.
    Last week, I was talking an old uni friend who is dealing with web hosting, servers and really big thing and he was telling me about this network diagnostic tools that you can use to find what is problem ever remotely.
    That make me change my mind and I thought to my self, it is not that wearied as I thought.
    I know my self I can quickly learn new technology as long there is documentation and training.
     
  18. Fergal1982

    Fergal1982 Petabyte Poster

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    Kobem?? :biggrin

    Seriously though, If you are doing any it responsibilities on your company network, you can consider yourself in IT. When you apply for IT roles, just emphasize those tasks over the non-IT tasks. That said, Electrical engineering is not a useless skill to have in IT (if you go down the hardware route of it at least), so dont totally ignore those skills.

    MCSE is probably not quite suitable for you yet, as said before. I would recommend seeking a more full-time IT position, and get a couple of lower level certificates to bolster your experience.

    What you see as Dyslexia, I see as a language barrier. All the pertinent signs are there that Rab's first language is not English.
     
    Certifications: ITIL Foundation; MCTS: Visual Studio Team Foundation Server 2010, Administration
    WIP: None at present
  19. supernova

    supernova Gigabyte Poster

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    See the thing is certification isn't training ,

    its to prove that you already have experience in the field, that's what a lot of new people to this forum dont understand.

    If you pick things up easily then i think you'll do much better to learn whilst on the job and it will look better on your CV for future jobs. I did voluntary IT work along side a dead end job when i started out to get the experience for my first IT job.

    Get that CV out.
     
    Last edited: Mar 18, 2010
    Certifications: Loads
    WIP: Lots

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