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Answered Cant get my head around the logic in DB- connector shell sizes..

Discussion in 'Hardware' started by Juelz, Aug 17, 2015.

  1. Juelz

    Juelz Gigabyte Poster

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    [​IMG]

    Feast your eyes upon the above image, I can see the obvious pattern from DA-15 to DD-50 (as the pins increases the letter advances) but how does DE-9 come into it? cant find ant form of explanation on google so can anyone explain in laymans terms? hopefully someone will explain before tomorrow night when I will continue typing up my revision notes, will tag @SimonD, as he will more than likely have an explanation.

     
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  2. Best Answer:
    Post #6 by dmarsh, Aug 17, 2015
  3. dmarsh

    dmarsh Terabyte Poster

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    They are just all types of 'D-Type' connector.

    Only 9 pin and 25 pin variants are common in computers, they are the old forms of serial ports and also 25 pin used to be used for parallel ports also.

    You also missed VGA which is a 15 pin 3 row variant of DE-15/HD-15.

    "The D-sub series of connectors was invented by ITT Cannon, part of ITT Corporation, in 1952.[1] Cannon's part-numbering system uses D as the prefix for the whole series, followed by one of A, B, C, D, or E denoting the shell size, followed by the number of pins or sockets, followed by either P (plug or pins[2]) or S (socket) denoting the gender of the part. Each shell size usually (see below for exceptions) corresponds to a certain number of pins or sockets: A with 15, B with 25, C with 37, D with 50, and E with 9.[3] For example, DB-25 denotes a D-sub with a 25-position shell size and a 25-position contact configuration. The contacts in either row of these connectors are spaced 326/3000 of an inch apart, or approximately 0.109 inches (2.77 mm), and the rows are spaced 0.112 inches (2.84 mm) apart (the pins in the two rows are offset by half the distance between adjacent contacts in a row).[4] This spacing is called Normal Density."

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/D-subminiature
     
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  4. Juelz

    Juelz Gigabyte Poster

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    Thanks but didnt answer the question in regards to DE-9 I get the 9 is related to the number of pins but what does the E relate to? As explained there seems to be a pattern between the increase of pins and the advancement of the letters but this pattern ends at DE-9.. or is this pattern not intentional? So E socket types just are called E and have 9 pins?
     
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  5. dmarsh

    dmarsh Terabyte Poster

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    Yep E is a shell type, E is big enough for 9 pins, but as I mentioned it can also house 15 comfortably in the form of VGA connector.

    Have a look at Maplins or RS Components, billions connectors, no point learning them all, just learn the computer specific ones.

    SCSI-1 also used a 50 pin D-Type, but there is probably nobody on this forum that's ever used one, so testing on such stuff is pretty dubious.
     
    Last edited: Aug 18, 2015
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  6. Juelz

    Juelz Gigabyte Poster

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    Riiight.. I see now, but I do have one last question in regards to VGA, why isn't it classed as a DA-15 then? If Im making sense of what you're saying isnt class based on number of pins?

    Thanks dmarsh, I'm new to hardware and trying to get the gist.
     
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  7. dmarsh

    dmarsh Terabyte Poster

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    DE is the size of the shell, VGA and 9 pin serial both have the same size shell, just different pin configurations.

    DA is an entirely different size to VGA

    DA is what used to be used for the PC gameport before USB.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Game_port

    USB has replaced 9 pin serial, 25 pin serial, and gameport connectors as well as parallel port on the PC.
     
    Last edited: Aug 17, 2015
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  8. Juelz

    Juelz Gigabyte Poster

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    @dmash right Im with you now! And I get where I was going wrong thanks alot!
     
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