1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Can't boot into GUI after changing my Graphics card

Discussion in 'Linux / Unix Discussion' started by michael78, Dec 20, 2005.

  1. michael78

    michael78 Terabyte Poster

    2,085
    29
    141
    I installed Ubuntu on an old Acer PC with onboard graphics. I decided to install a PCI NVidia MX440 card to free up the RAM a little. After doing so it won't boot into the GUI (Gnome) and comes up with a blue screen with the following message-

    "Failed to start the X server (Your Graphical Interface). It is likely that it is not set up correctly. Would you like to view the X server output to diagnose the problem?"

    I press yes and it comes up with info which I click through and then comes up with a message saying-

    "The X server is now disabled. Restart GDM when it is configured correctly."

    Then it goes to a prompt for the username and password.

    I am totaly lost on how to fix this. I'm assuming that it's because it can't find the drivers for my new card. Can anyone help me to fix this problem.

    Cheers in advance

    Michael
     
    Certifications: A+ | Network+ | Security+ | MCP | MCDST | MCTS: Hyper-V | MCTS: AD | MCTS: Exchange 2007 | MCTS: Windows 7 | MCSA: 2003 | ITIL Foundation v3 | CCA: Xenapp 5.0 | MCITP: Enterprise Desktop Administrator on Windows 7 | MCITP: Enterprise Desktop Support Technician on Windows 7
    WIP: Online SAN Overview, VCP in December 2011
  2. ffreeloader

    ffreeloader Terabyte Poster

    3,661
    106
    167
    The problem is your /etc/X11/F86Config-4 file. It wasn't modified at startup so you have to do it because as far as it knows you still have your old video card installed. Boot up and X Server will fail to start again and take you to a text prompt, or should anyway. Or, boot into the recovery mode option at the grub start up screen. Log in as root. (If you boot to recovery mode it should do a partial startup and then ask you for the root password. At least that is how Debian does it.) Once logged in as root run "dpkg-reconfigure xserver-xfree86". That will allow you to enter the parameters for your new video card.
     
    Certifications: MCSE, MCDBA, CCNA, A+
    WIP: LPIC 1
  3. michael78

    michael78 Terabyte Poster

    2,085
    29
    141
    Cheers Ffreeloader, I will give it a try tonight and will let you know how I get on...:D
     
    Certifications: A+ | Network+ | Security+ | MCP | MCDST | MCTS: Hyper-V | MCTS: AD | MCTS: Exchange 2007 | MCTS: Windows 7 | MCSA: 2003 | ITIL Foundation v3 | CCA: Xenapp 5.0 | MCITP: Enterprise Desktop Administrator on Windows 7 | MCITP: Enterprise Desktop Support Technician on Windows 7
    WIP: Online SAN Overview, VCP in December 2011
  4. Boycie
    Honorary Member

    Boycie Senior Beer Tester

    6,281
    85
    174
    Sly,

    I had the same problem when i stuck Ubuntu on an old P2 system. It would boot into the GUI. I have left it on there because when i get some time i would like to get it to work.
    It works straight away with newer hardware no probs....
    My desktop with P4, ATI graphics and soundblaster works a treat.
    Let us know when you get it working.
     
    Certifications: MCSA 2003, MCDST, A+, N+, CTT+, MCT
  5. michael78

    michael78 Terabyte Poster

    2,085
    29
    141
    I like Ubuntu and the idea of Linux but I think thats where Linux really is lightyears behind windows in terms of ease of use. A simple hardware change messes linux up where Windows would boot up with the new hardware.
     
    Certifications: A+ | Network+ | Security+ | MCP | MCDST | MCTS: Hyper-V | MCTS: AD | MCTS: Exchange 2007 | MCTS: Windows 7 | MCSA: 2003 | ITIL Foundation v3 | CCA: Xenapp 5.0 | MCITP: Enterprise Desktop Administrator on Windows 7 | MCITP: Enterprise Desktop Support Technician on Windows 7
    WIP: Online SAN Overview, VCP in December 2011
  6. Boycie
    Honorary Member

    Boycie Senior Beer Tester

    6,281
    85
    174
    Not always! Agreed it finds drivers for 95% of hardware. Don't forget Windows wants you to enter the WPA after a major hardware change too!
     
    Certifications: MCSA 2003, MCDST, A+, N+, CTT+, MCT
  7. michael78

    michael78 Terabyte Poster

    2,085
    29
    141
    Fair point Boyce about the WPA. I think I've just been brainwashed by microsoft all these years...:eek:
     
    Certifications: A+ | Network+ | Security+ | MCP | MCDST | MCTS: Hyper-V | MCTS: AD | MCTS: Exchange 2007 | MCTS: Windows 7 | MCSA: 2003 | ITIL Foundation v3 | CCA: Xenapp 5.0 | MCITP: Enterprise Desktop Administrator on Windows 7 | MCITP: Enterprise Desktop Support Technician on Windows 7
    WIP: Online SAN Overview, VCP in December 2011
  8. ffreeloader

    ffreeloader Terabyte Poster

    3,661
    106
    167
    I couldn't disagree more. Linux will still boot even with a misconfigured Xserver. It just won't boot into a gui. And, I've run into just as many problems with Windows drivers as I have with Linux kernel modules(what Windows calls drivers).

    You forget that Windows gui is the OS now. In Linux the gui runs on top of the OS. It's just a piece of software that's installed just like any other piece of software. Because of that the gui doesn't always recognize video card changes even though the Linux kernel does. That's why the gui won't start. The kernel recognized different hardware than the gui has been told about. All you need to do when changing the video card is boot into recovery mode and edit your /etc/X11/F86Config-4 file using vi or emacs, or run dpkg-reconfigure xserver-xfree86 and choose the correct video card at boot.

    The other problem people run into is manufacturer support. They will support Windows and not Linux because they want to remain proprietary. ATI is terrible at this. Their Linux drivers are very bad. NVidia, even though you have to do some work to install their drivers, are better but even then they release their Linux drivers later than they do their Windows drivers.

    So, the fault isn't Linux. It's the video card manufacturers not supporting Linux. If they would release the needed information to the Open Source community the driver issue would be moot, but they won't do that. Is that the fault of the Open Source community, i.e. Linux? I think not.
     
    Certifications: MCSE, MCDBA, CCNA, A+
    WIP: LPIC 1
  9. michael78

    michael78 Terabyte Poster

    2,085
    29
    141
    Fair point...:)
     
    Certifications: A+ | Network+ | Security+ | MCP | MCDST | MCTS: Hyper-V | MCTS: AD | MCTS: Exchange 2007 | MCTS: Windows 7 | MCSA: 2003 | ITIL Foundation v3 | CCA: Xenapp 5.0 | MCITP: Enterprise Desktop Administrator on Windows 7 | MCITP: Enterprise Desktop Support Technician on Windows 7
    WIP: Online SAN Overview, VCP in December 2011

Share This Page

Loading...