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Can 2 pc's on different sub nets talk to each other?

Discussion in 'Network+' started by billynw, Jun 25, 2011.

  1. billynw

    billynw Bit Poster

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    Hi Guys,
    I'm learning about sub netting at the moment & studying for my N+ next month.

    I'm playing about at home & just wanted to know can 2 PC's on differnet subnets but using the same home router/switch talk to each other.

    This is what I have done.
    Home Router/switch Addy is 192.168.0.1 & I have set the subnet mask to 255.255.255.192

    Ok I have 4 PC's in total.
    PC 1 192.168.0.2
    PC 2 192.168.0.3

    PC 3 192.168.0.129
    PC 4 192.168.0.130

    PC 1 & PC 2 can png each other fine & surf the net.

    PC 3 & PC 4 can png each other fine but not surf the net ( as router is in differnt sub net)

    But PC 1 & 2 Cannot ping PC 3 & 4.

    Is this correct & would you do something like this to split the network up say into the office for file sharing & net connection and the work shop just for say file sharing?

    Many thanks guys,
    Billy
     
    Last edited: Jun 25, 2011
    Certifications: CISCO CCNA, CompTIA A+,N+. Windows 7 70-680,city and guilds 3666 copper & Fibre
  2. DC Pr0Mo

    DC Pr0Mo Kilobyte Poster

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    They can if both subnets a connected via a router, your two subnets are connected via a switch so it has the expected results you posted.
     
    Certifications: MCDST | BSc Network Computing
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  3. soundian

    soundian Gigabyte Poster

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    I assume you mean PC3 and PC4 can ping each other but not surf the net.

    It won't work without a router in between 192.168.0.0 and 192.169.0.128. The PCs on 192.168.0.128 do not have a default gateway on their subnet, which they would need to be able to find the 192.168.0.0 subnet.
    Basically, you need a router to join the subnets together. Without a router hosts can only talk to other hosts in their broadcast domain.
    Or, to put it another way, you're trying to perform a layer 3 operation on a layer 2 device.
     
    Certifications: A+, N+,MCDST,MCTS(680), MCP(270, 271, 272), ITILv3F, CCENT
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  4. billynw

    billynw Bit Poster

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    Many thanks for your feed back here gents.

    Yes, sorry I did mean PC3 and PC4 can ping each other but not surf the net (typo).

    At the moment I just messing about with my the router that Sky gave me its a F@ST2304. Just home stuff.

    So could I have 2 differnet subnets connected to the same switch then connected to a router is this what you mean?

    Could 2 different subnets share the same default gateway to connect to the internet, if there both using the same switch. I take this can't be done as the Default gate is in one or the other sub net.

    Or what I'm trying to do is this what you would use Vlans for?
     
    Last edited: Jun 25, 2011
    Certifications: CISCO CCNA, CompTIA A+,N+. Windows 7 70-680,city and guilds 3666 copper & Fibre
  5. SimonD

    SimonD Terabyte Poster Moderator

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    What exactly are you trying to accomplish?

    First of all I would ask why you want to play around with different subnets when you want all the machines to have access to the net (on a home network environment).

    If you do want to go down the different subnet route then I would suggest getting two switches and having one of your machines being used as a multi-homed server, this multi-homed server would be issued with addresses from both ranges but only a single gateway address (on the nic that uses the 192.168.0.1 gateway) and then all the clients on the .128 network would have the second nic on that machine as their gateway.

    VLANs are used to isolate traffic away from network segments that don't need or require access to that segment, for example you would VLAN off Storage Networks (such as iSCSI traffic) so that only machines in that VLAN would get that traffic.
     
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  6. mcrilly

    mcrilly Byte Poster

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    Basically each subnet is a network and a router represents that network to anything external to it. Your router needs to be told out which interface to find each network. Once it knows this information, such as network 192.168.0.0/26 on interface Fa0/1 & 192.168.0.128/26 on interface Fa0/2, it can route traffic (L3) between the subnets.
     
    Certifications: CCENT
    WIP: CCNA, RHCE, & VCP
  7. billynw

    billynw Bit Poster

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    Many thanks for this info guys.

    Im not trying to accomplish anything just messing about with some PC's and home router.
    I find it the best way to learn by changing setting, messing about and asking question.

    Just reading books & watching vidoes gets a bit boring, so thought I would start messing about.

    Thanks again
     
    Certifications: CISCO CCNA, CompTIA A+,N+. Windows 7 70-680,city and guilds 3666 copper & Fibre
  8. mcrilly

    mcrilly Byte Poster

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    "Messing" about is the best way to learn for most people - hands on experience - and it's certainly the best way I learn.

    I agree that videos and books alone can be boring, so get a lab and start playing :-)
     
    Certifications: CCENT
    WIP: CCNA, RHCE, & VCP

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