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cable question and aui connector

Discussion in 'General Cisco Certifications' started by kobem, Oct 4, 2007.

  1. kobem

    kobem Megabyte Poster

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    1- is this aui connector still used and where ?

    2- there is a cable i mean serial cable used between routers (dte - dce) also there is an rs-232 cable
    then its serial too what is the difference among these two? are both of these rs-232 cable ?
     
    Certifications: CCNA
  2. hbroomhall

    hbroomhall Petabyte Poster Gold Member

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    Yes. One of our telephone exchanges uses them, and one we have just decommissioned used them.
    Depends on how pedantic you are over the use of RS-232 (nowadays correctly called EIA-232).

    Most people use the term RS232 to mean all serial, which may not be absolutely correct. For example, X.21 is 'serial', but isn't strictly EIA-232.

    So you need to check the router specs to see what you actualy have.

    Harry.
     
    Certifications: ECDL A+ Network+ i-Net+
    WIP: Server+
  3. kobem

    kobem Megabyte Poster

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    from pc to modem again rs-232 ?

    although being so silly question i wanna ask one more

    from pc to switch or from pc to router should we only use console cable ? (i think it is only used to configure router or switch but where are the interfaces ?)



     
    Certifications: CCNA
  4. hbroomhall

    hbroomhall Petabyte Poster Gold Member

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    Traditional modems are usualy RS-232, as that has traditionaly been one of the standard ports available on a PC.
    Depends on the switch or router. The 2950 I have here can be configured either via console port or over the network. Obviously you will need to use the console port on a completely unconfigured switch.

    Harry.
     
    Certifications: ECDL A+ Network+ i-Net+
    WIP: Server+
  5. r.h.lee

    r.h.lee Gigabyte Poster

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    kobem,

    It depends on the type of modem. What kind of PC do you have? What kind of modem do you have?

    This is not one more question.
     
    Certifications: MCSE, MCP+I, MCP, CCNA, A+
    WIP: CCDA
  6. kobem

    kobem Megabyte Poster

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    nowadays modems like dsl modems doesn't contain rs - 232 port i only witnessed ethernet port or usb ..

    secondly i didn't want to say about console port ...

    consider there are two routers linked each other and under each router there are pcs
    like


    ethernet
    pc--------- router1======router2---------- pc

    router1======router2

    ethernet
    router2---------- pc

    according to my schema between pc and router 1 then between router2 and pc ETHERNET IS AVAILABLE SO THAT THERE HAS TO BE AN ETHERNET CABLE AM I WRONG (EXCEPT CONSOLE CABLE)?
     
    Certifications: CCNA
  7. kobem

    kobem Megabyte Poster

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    i meant analog modem but where are they used in these days? i do not use these types i have dsl modem ..
     
    Certifications: CCNA
  8. hbroomhall

    hbroomhall Petabyte Poster Gold Member

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    That is why I said 'traditional modems'. I'll put it another way - modems that signal within the speech-band, such as V.90 and V.92, normaly use an RS-232 cable.
    For the above I'd use Ethernet throughout.

    Harry.
     
    Certifications: ECDL A+ Network+ i-Net+
    WIP: Server+
  9. hbroomhall

    hbroomhall Petabyte Poster Gold Member

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    They are used where either DSL is not available, or is too expensive. The company I work for is an ISP and still has a considerable number of customers dialing in with V.90 modems.

    Harry.
     
    Certifications: ECDL A+ Network+ i-Net+
    WIP: Server+
  10. kobem

    kobem Megabyte Poster

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    i got what you tried to tell me here : you say if you give ip addresses and configured the router or switch
    before by telnetting to specified interface you may continue configuring from command console

    but my purpose wasn't that and i told it on my previous reply
     
    Certifications: CCNA
  11. r.h.lee

    r.h.lee Gigabyte Poster

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    kobem,

    Analog modems are used for dialup access. For some, that's the only option if they don't have broadband access.
     
    Certifications: MCSE, MCP+I, MCP, CCNA, A+
    WIP: CCDA
  12. kobem

    kobem Megabyte Poster

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    what do you mean by this ? "For the above I'd use Ethernet throughout".


    is it this : you configure router or switch(unconfigured) building a console (rolled)cable
    however , pc to router 1 ------->ethernet (cat 5 cross)
    router2 to pc -------> ethernet (cat 5 cross)

    AM I WRONG HERE?
     
    Certifications: CCNA
  13. hbroomhall

    hbroomhall Petabyte Poster Gold Member

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    I'm getting confused here as I don't really know what you are asking.

    During the config phase you would use a rollover cable to the console port from a pc to do this.
    After the config is done connect each PC to the router ethernet ports with an uncrossed ethernet cable, and connect the routers together with a crossed or uncrossed ethernet cable, depending on whether the ports were auto-mdx or how they were configured.

    Harry.
     
    Certifications: ECDL A+ Network+ i-Net+
    WIP: Server+
  14. kobem

    kobem Megabyte Poster

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    yeah but i didn't want to say that ethernet cable (cat 5) is used for "maintaining the configuration only"

    it should also be used (between router and pc) to ping the router ethernet interface for instance

    is this true?
     
    Certifications: CCNA
  15. hbroomhall

    hbroomhall Petabyte Poster Gold Member

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    I think that is what I just said.

    Harry.
     
    Certifications: ECDL A+ Network+ i-Net+
    WIP: Server+
  16. kobem

    kobem Megabyte Poster

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    hm , just a minute for think
     
    Certifications: CCNA

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