1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

C++, Yay or Nay

Discussion in 'The Lounge - Off Topic' started by Jaron78, Nov 28, 2015.

  1. Jaron78

    Jaron78 Megabyte Poster

    674
    95
    92
    I was on Udemy the other day and have managed to get a Cool C++ Course.

    Just wondered on peoples views of C++ over Java? Programming has always appealed to me and find it interesting.

    I am working on the Network+ and Linux+ but there is a very good chance work will pay for the Course for this. I have an appraisal next week (Which I think will be fine) so I will raise it then.

    To be honest, C++ is more of a Hobby, but something that will look great on a CV?

    Thoughts please?

    Thanks,

    Ron
     
  2. Juelz

    Juelz Gigabyte Poster

    Top Poster
    of the Month

    1,180
    186
    176
    I dont see why not, if you have the time go for it, the more knowledge the better! My friend learned java and made a pretty cool game.
     
    Certifications: MTA Windows Fundamentals, ITIL Foundation, Apple Mac Integration 10.12
    WIP: MTA Networking Fundamentals| MTA Windows Server Administration Fundamentals
    Jaron78 likes this.
  3. dmarsh

    dmarsh Terabyte Poster

    3,782
    302
    184
    I was a professional C++ programmer for 7 years, and Java programmer for 12+. You can PM me with any questions.

    C++ was the predominant language in the 1990's when machines were pretty limited, because like C it was efficient, but also allowed large systems to be built due to its Object Orientated extensions.

    Unless you are programming for a resource constrained device or absolutely need full control of the hardware its arguably not the best language to learn for most people.

    "C makes it easy to shoot yourself in the foot; C++ makes it harder, but when you do it blows your whole leg off."
    Bjarne Stroustrup

    "Go further by standing on the shoulders of giants, C++ programmers stand on each others' toes."

    C++ does look great on a CV, but to be good at it realistically requires about 3 years full-time programming. Many program in it for years and still make subtle and disastrous bugs without realizing.

    Modern languages can give you most of the performance gains and less of the baggage and poor language design choices.

    Ultimately programming is about producing useful working software on budget, and today C++ is rarely the first choice given that objective.
     
    Last edited: Nov 28, 2015
    Certifications: CITP, BSc, HND, SCJP, SCJD, SCWCD, SCBCD, SCEA, N+, Sec+, Proj+, Server+, Linux+, MCTS, MCPD, MCSA, MCITP, CCDH
    Jaron78 likes this.
  4. Sparky
    Highly Decorated Member Award

    Sparky Zettabyte Poster Moderator

    10,191
    299
    319
    I would say go for it. I used to code in C++ and Visual Basic before I moved into infrastructure consultancy. I don’t use C++ anymore but I do lots of scripting for our monitoring system and I think using C++ previously makes this task much easier.
     
    Certifications: MSc MCSE MCSA:M MCSA:S MCITP:EA MCTS(x5) Security+ Network+ A+
    WIP: Exchange 2007\2010
    Jaron78 likes this.
  5. Jaron78

    Jaron78 Megabyte Poster

    674
    95
    92
    Thanks Guys, as always very helpful. In all honesty, I am not sure I would want to move into coding full time. But I am the "IT Guy" for our Tech Hub and it would be nice to get a grasp of what people mean when we are all standing round having a coffee or something.

    Once I have completed the course it would be something I would like to add to a CV, and perhaps starting out with C++ would lead onto me understanding more in regards to Java / SQL? I have seen how much some of these guys get paid ha ha.

    Also I suppose it never hurts to be able to throw in comments during an appraisal about having leant to code?
     
  6. dmarsh

    dmarsh Terabyte Poster

    3,782
    302
    184
    C++ 14 is the latest spec, so I'd be careful when taking a course what version of the language they are teaching.

    Java is pretty easy to learn once you know C++. Both languages are now quite dated. C# is a nice compromise, Python is also a nice dynamic language for beginners.

    If you're up for something more obscure there's stuff like Dart, Go, Haskell, Scala.

    SQL is not that similar to C++, its declarative and kind of functional in nature, where C++ is imperative.

    Its worth learning them all if you have time :D
     
    Certifications: CITP, BSc, HND, SCJP, SCJD, SCWCD, SCBCD, SCEA, N+, Sec+, Proj+, Server+, Linux+, MCTS, MCPD, MCSA, MCITP, CCDH
    Jaron78 likes this.
  7. Sparky
    Highly Decorated Member Award

    Sparky Zettabyte Poster Moderator

    10,191
    299
    319

    Yeah – if you are in a support role you will may have to support SQL server. I am by no means a SQL DBA but have migrated many SQL servers as part of a domain upgrade. The SQL server may be hosting third party applications or Sharepoint.
     
    Certifications: MSc MCSE MCSA:M MCSA:S MCITP:EA MCTS(x5) Security+ Network+ A+
    WIP: Exchange 2007\2010

Share This Page

Loading...