1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Bridge / L2 Switch question.

Discussion in 'Network+' started by Modey, Jun 17, 2005.

  1. Modey

    Modey Terabyte Poster

    2,397
    99
    154
    Hey all ...

    I just had a question that seems a bit wrong to me.

    It's one of these questions that has a scenario, a proposed solution, then a required outcome + desirable outcomes.

    So there is a network, no subnets, it's getting allot of collisions. They want to split it into two collision domains to improve effieciency.

    So the proposal is to fit a L2 switch in order to divide the network into 2 collision domains.

    The option result would be to divide the network with a device that also provides routing services.


    So I'm thinking that a bridge is the natural choice here as that does exactly what is required. A switch doesn't split it into collision domains, surely the point of it is to make direct connections between the computers on the LAN, thus eliminating collisions completely.

    So the answers go along the lines of ... the proposed solution fulfills the primary requirment, doesn't fulfill it, fulfils both the primary & desired etc...

    so I put that it didn't fullfil either the primary or optional requirements. And was wrong, it says that fitting a switch indeed does split the network into two collision domains.

    So is that right? Have I misunderstood how switches and bridges work?


    If anything at least I did learn something, apparently L3 switches can provide routing as well, which I didn't know.
     
    Certifications: A+, N+, MCP, MCDST, MCSA 2K3, MCTS, MOS, MTA, MCT, MCITP:EDST7, MCSA W7, Citrix CCA, ITIL Foundation
    WIP: Nada
  2. Modey

    Modey Terabyte Poster

    2,397
    99
    154
    Damn, no takers eh? Oh well, off to do the N+ now, just hope I don't get a question like this!
     
    Certifications: A+, N+, MCP, MCDST, MCSA 2K3, MCTS, MOS, MTA, MCT, MCITP:EDST7, MCSA W7, Citrix CCA, ITIL Foundation
    WIP: Nada
  3. Boycie
    Honorary Member

    Boycie Senior Beer Tester

    6,281
    85
    174
    Sorry Modey. I did see your question last night but 1) I was trying to get my network storage set-up and 2)wasn't sure why your answer was wrong and would have liked to look through the David Groth book to find out why. There is always the chance of the test having a wrong answer!
    Good luck with the test, let us know how you get on.
     
    Certifications: MCSA 2003, MCDST, A+, N+, CTT+, MCT
  4. Modey

    Modey Terabyte Poster

    2,397
    99
    154
    Thanks anyway Boyce, I passed so it's all good. :)

    Did you get your Network USB interface thing working yet?
     
    Certifications: A+, N+, MCP, MCDST, MCSA 2K3, MCTS, MOS, MTA, MCT, MCITP:EDST7, MCSA W7, Citrix CCA, ITIL Foundation
    WIP: Nada
  5. Phoenix
    Honorary Member

    Phoenix 53656e696f7220 4d6f64

    5,726
    175
    221
    A Switch does seperate it into collision domains mate
    each swichport is a seperate collision domain, as collisions are not propogated, however all ports on the switch are still the same broadcast domain
     
    Certifications: MCSE, MCITP, VCP
    WIP: > 0
  6. tripwire45
    Honorary Member

    tripwire45 Zettabyte Poster

    13,493
    179
    287
    Ryan nails it again. :)

    Any two connected and communicating ports on an L2 switch constitute a collision domain for those two nodes. If you are talking about separating network 1 and network 2 into two collision domains, I agree that an L2 bridge would do the trick.

    L3 switches basically have an extra circuit board and bit of programming added that allows them to do some routing functions but it doesn't take the place of an actual router, imho.
     
    Certifications: A+ and Network+

Share This Page

Loading...