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Boson simulator

Discussion in 'Routing & Switching' started by chongchong, Jul 27, 2007.

  1. chongchong

    chongchong New Member

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    Hi, guys,

    I downloaded a Boson simulator V6.00.02.08, I tried to type "lab_A(config)#interface ethernet 0/0", according to the book "CCNA study guide", written by Todd, but it does not work, I tried "interface ethernet 0", which worked, while "interface serial 0/0" worked well. can anyone tell me the reason?

    And I found there are many differences between that book and the simulator. The book uses 2600 router in chapter5 ,which has fastethernet interface, but in simulator, there is only ethernet interface.

    Well, do i misunderstand anything?

    Thanks for anyone's clarification.
     
  2. simongrahamuk
    Honorary Member

    simongrahamuk Hmmmmmmm?

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    I'm sure that the man from boson will be out of bed before to long to lend you a hand. :biggrin
     
  3. tripwire45
    Honorary Member

    tripwire45 Zettabyte Poster

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    I don't think the simulator is written to support all possible commands. Is the command you used referenced in the book as one you can use on the simulator?
     
    Certifications: A+ and Network+
  4. Tinus1959

    Tinus1959 Gigabyte Poster

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    Cisco routers have a special way of numbering the interfaces.
    You have (for instance) four slots. These are numbered from 0 to 3. In every bay you may have 1 to 4 interfaces. These are also numbered from 0 to 3.
    So the numbering is fastethernet0/0 meaning the first interface in the first slot.
    bri0/0 means the first ISDN interface in the first slot.
    Depending on what router you choose, you have different configurations.
    You could have 1 serial, 4 fast ethernet, 1 bri.
    An other router could give you 4 serial, 16 fast ethernet.
     
    Certifications: See my signature
    WIP: MCSD, MCAD, CCNA, CCNP
  5. MacAllan

    MacAllan Byte Poster

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    Some cisco switches / routers have a fixed set of ports; others are provided on a replaceable module, or 'slot'.

    Fixed ports are referenced as per the simulator: ethernet 0

    Ports on slots are referenced in relation to the module card, or interface, of which there may be more than one. Numbering begins at 0

    So, the first port on a router for the first slot --> ethernet 0/0

    Making it more tricky, switches tend to number from 1 --> ethernet 1/0

    Making it even more tricky, there are sometimes two levels to the modular interface, so you see things like fastethernet 1/1/0.

    Usually the quick and dirty way, is to do 'show run' and use the naming scheme you see there.

    As to why the simulator has ethernet and the book has fastethernet, well, over to our resident expert for that one.... But for the sake of the simulations it will really make no difference....
     
    Certifications: A+, N+, CCNA
    WIP: CCNP, Linux+
  6. MacAllan

    MacAllan Byte Poster

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    Try this from google.


    :blink
     
    Certifications: A+, N+, CCNA
    WIP: CCNP, Linux+
  7. BosonMichael
    Highly Decorated Member Award

    BosonMichael Yottabyte Poster

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    Most everyone has already given good explanations... a fixed Ethernet port would show up as just e0, whereas one that is on a slot/port configuration would be e0/0. To further confuse things, there are some that are on a module/slot/port configuration, and would be written e0/0/0. All are possible... it just depends on the type of router and its current configuration.

    As has already been explained, not all routers and switches have the same configuration. Sure, the book may have routers with FastEthernet ports, and the simulator may have routers with Ethernet ports, but they're basically the same except for speed. By that same measure, we would have been just as accurate of a simulation if we had chosen GigabitEthernet ports instead. Just follow the labs, and know how to configure an Ethernet-type interface, and you'll be fine.

    Question: Does the lab explanation state Ethernet0/0? Or does it state Ethernet0? Both can be correct... but if something in the lab asks you to configure Ethernet0/0, and the simulator only accepts Ethernet0, then that's an error we will want to fix. Just let me know, and I'll pass it along to our programming department if it needs to be fixed.

    Let me know if you have any other questions!
     
    Certifications: CISSP, MCSE+I, MCSE: Security, MCSE: Messaging, MCDST, MCDBA, MCTS, OCP, CCNP, CCDP, CCNA Security, CCNA Voice, CNE, SCSA, Security+, Linux+, Server+, Network+, A+
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  8. Pablo1888

    Pablo1888 Byte Poster

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    I found that not all commands work whilst using the Boson CCNA version. I typed in the command default-information originate and it came up with a message that it was only supported in the CCNP version. :dry
     
    Certifications: MOUS Master, MCP 70-210, A+
    WIP: CCNA
  9. BosonMichael
    Highly Decorated Member Award

    BosonMichael Yottabyte Poster

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    That's... because... you don't need to know default-information originate for the CCNA... :blink Sorry, but it's a simulator, not a full-fledged router. If you want access to all of the commands, buy a real Cisco router. If you want access to the commands you'll need for the exam, get a simulator.

    For the record, you won't have access to all of the commands on the simulator in Cisco's own exam.
     
    Certifications: CISSP, MCSE+I, MCSE: Security, MCSE: Messaging, MCDST, MCDBA, MCTS, OCP, CCNP, CCDP, CCNA Security, CCNA Voice, CNE, SCSA, Security+, Linux+, Server+, Network+, A+
    WIP: Just about everything!
  10. Pablo1888

    Pablo1888 Byte Poster

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    Didn't reply to this thread sooner as I've been on holiday.

    Yeah I understand that simulators are just that - simulators.

    The reason I was wishing to use this command is that it crops up in the CCNA3 Student Lab manual (Lab 2.3.6 Propagating Default Routes in an OSPF Domain). I also had to use it when I was completing my case study, but got there in the end using Packet Tracer. :biggrin
     
    Certifications: MOUS Master, MCP 70-210, A+
    WIP: CCNA

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