1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Benefit of DNS intergrated zones

Discussion in 'Active Directory Exams' started by lifeisshortmove, Jun 30, 2011.

  1. lifeisshortmove

    lifeisshortmove Bit Poster

    42
    0
    19
    Hello,

    I know that DNS integrated zones are useful because of:

    1) Multimaster replication: No need to configure zone transfers and fault tolerance
    2) Secure Dynamic Updates: Only computers that are a member of the domain can register/update their records in DNS. Also you can set permissions on the entire zone or single records.

    The VAGUE benefit as it's mentioned in the MOC (MS Official Course) book is "Standard zone transfers to other DNS servers". I'll copy/ paste the paragraph
    Standard zone transfers to other DNS servers. Performs standard zone
    transfers to DNS servers that are not configured as domain controllers. It
    also performs standard zone transfers to DNS servers that are in other
    domains, which is the required method for replicating zones to DNS servers
    in other domains"

    I don't know even how that can be done??
     
  2. sheepluv

    sheepluv Byte Poster

    114
    1
    32
    Standard zone transfers - assuming these are not AD integrated DNS servers (ADI DNS only works on DCs too iirc)

    In this config you have a primary DNS and a Secondary DNS, the secondary is Read only IIRC and periodically does a transfer of all the primary records to the secondary. You can configure this from the DNS server console!

    Standard does not have permissions as is like the older uni* type of DNS server so could transfer across domains.

    Start here DNS: Domain Name System(DNS)
     
    Last edited: Jun 30, 2011
    Certifications: CCNA | HND | 70-646
  3. dales

    dales Gigabyte Poster

    1,998
    46
    97
    You do it by creating a new secondary forward lookup zone on another dns server not in the domain and point it at the authorotive dns servers for the zone, then you tell the dns server/s in the domain to accept zone transfer request to the ip of the dns server out of the domain
     
    Certifications: vExpert 2014+2015+2016,VCP-DT,CCE-V, CCE-AD, CCP-AD, CCEE, CCAA XenApp, CCA Netscaler, XenApp 6.5, XenDesktop 5 & Xenserver 6,VCP3+5,VTSP,MCSA MCDST MCP A+ ITIL F
    WIP: Nothing
  4. sheepluv

    sheepluv Byte Poster

    114
    1
    32
    @lifeisshortmove

    However I do recommend strongly that you research the issues yourself. Learn to find information and read around the whole topic not just get answers. Then maybe come and discuss solutions if still confused
     
    Last edited: Jun 30, 2011
    Certifications: CCNA | HND | 70-646
  5. lifeisshortmove

    lifeisshortmove Bit Poster

    42
    0
    19
    YUP now I got it. It makes sense. Thank you very much and **** DNS
     
  6. lifeisshortmove

    lifeisshortmove Bit Poster

    42
    0
    19
    First of all, thanks for your reply. Sometimes I don't know what keywords to use to search for a CERTAIN scenario like the one I was asking about here. Anyway, I'll make a research before I come here again. I promise :)
     
  7. Phoenix
    Honorary Member

    Phoenix 53656e696f7220 4d6f64

    5,726
    175
    221
    While I can often echo your frustration with DNS, learn it very well, it is one of the lynchpins of modern networks, and gets in the way of any number of things when it goes wrong, without always hinting at the problem
    DNS problems can break almost anything, in anyway, so be patient and take the time to learn it well, it is a very important skill to have, often overlooked by many as just 'something simple'

    Good luck
     
    Certifications: MCSE, MCITP, VCP
    WIP: > 0
  8. jk2447

    jk2447 Petabyte Poster Moderator

    5,484
    354
    249
    What have you done with Ryan? This doesn't read like one of your usual posts mate, I like it!
     
    Certifications: BSc (Hons), HND IT, HND Computing, ITIL-F, MBCS CITP, MCP (270,290,291,293,294,298,299,410,411,412) MCTS (401,620,624,652) MCSA:Security, MCSE: Security, Security+, CPTS, VCP4, CCA (XenApp6.5), MCSA 2012, VCP5, VCP6-NV
  9. sheepluv

    sheepluv Byte Poster

    114
    1
    32
    Dont mean to sound harsh there, but learning to find information on the topic is a very important skill. Technet is one resource, I got there from Google.
    When you say keywords its really the topic I searched for and the reason I pointed to Technet was there was a lot of information on the whole subject there (rather than google the exact question or something). I recommend you read up on the whole subject and try somethings out in a lab. Some subjects can get deep but learn as much as you need to, exam specific study guides are good for this as you learn as far as you need to plus a bit more if you like it :)

    Sometimes there are very specific problems that you cant work out and we all have a google around for them. What I do is try my hardest to work out them out first by knowing what I am doing (from subject study) thats a good approach, unless im in a big rush! :)

    Good luck.
     
    Last edited: Jul 1, 2011
    Certifications: CCNA | HND | 70-646
  10. lifeisshortmove

    lifeisshortmove Bit Poster

    42
    0
    19
    Ok, I'll google the BIG topic not my specific question. It may be a tedious thing but it may lead me to the solution. On the other hand, as you said having a robust understanding of the subject makes it easier to figure out where EXACTLY is the problem. But, DNS is still somehow confusing to me and I'll read its chapters through again.
     
  11. sheepluv

    sheepluv Byte Poster

    114
    1
    32
    Yeh DNS can get deep and I do not know everything about it. Often if you read up on a subject it seems well confusing but when you get some practical experience of it (like a lab setup etc.) it becomes clear(er). I done it in practice before reading up on it (by setting up an AD domain), so seen it in action then learnt about it properly from reading.

    Get some basics first, try this Intro to DNS Introduction to DNS
     
    Certifications: CCNA | HND | 70-646
  12. lifeisshortmove

    lifeisshortmove Bit Poster

    42
    0
    19
    Dear sheepluv,

    I have studied course 2277C (exam 70-291 that contains DHCP, DNS, IPSec, ...etc) and I have used the MOC (Microsoft Officlal Course) book. It contains a lot of information. But as I said before it's dry information. I have set a lab setup using VMware and played a lot with the configuration. I know you would say you can used MS press books, technet, ...etc. But I feel that getting information from many resources for a newbie is not that good. Because every resource explains things in a different way. I like to concentrate on one resource at least at the beginning.
     
  13. sheepluv

    sheepluv Byte Poster

    114
    1
    32
    Yeh is ok to concentrate on one book (which gets good reviews), would be there forever otherwise :) But there is no prob with checking another relevant source for some topics. Read around from other sources as it may make far more sense from someone else, maybe less dry/more interesting version etc. Im sure different versions work better for different people. Like said, remember it can often click if you spend time playing around with it

    For example I was reading Sybex MCITP book, and some of it seemed wrong or a bit confusing. I wanted to keep with the book for exam 70-646 but I also have a Sybex `Mark Minasi` Server 2008 R2 book which is a much more thorough book and he is good author, so I dipped into that too.

    You still having probs with DNS?
     
    Last edited: Jul 1, 2011
    Certifications: CCNA | HND | 70-646
  14. lifeisshortmove

    lifeisshortmove Bit Poster

    42
    0
    19
    Unfortunately, yes. Some issues like difference between conditional forwarding, stub zones, and delegated zones?

    When to use which?
    Are there scenarios where you can use one and cannot use another?

    Note: I have tried configuring ALL of those on VMs and they are working fine. No problem concerning the configs.
    But "Don't answer" ;) I'll google around and if I could not find an answer I'll come back and ask
     
  15. GW

    GW Byte Poster

    119
    4
    39
    What I try to do which works for me is to have two books, one is my primary book and the other secondary. When I read a chapter on a topic in the primary book I go and read the same topic material in the second book and information that I find that isn't in the primary book or additional information I find I write in the margins of the first book so when I review the chapter again that information is there for me to read over.

    When I was taking a course at a computer school I was using this technique and I was studying ahead of the class so the lecture re-enforces what I was reading and using this technique I was able to add to the instructors lecture on the various topics which also made the class better since the instructor would go deeper in the topics than what is required for just passing the exam.

    GW
     
    Certifications: MCP x4, CompTia x3
    WIP: Cisco CCNA

Share This Page

Loading...