1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Beginner wants to learn .net/asp and get qualified. Advice needed!

Discussion in 'MCAD / MCSD / MCPD' started by lynxe, May 8, 2012.

  1. lynxe

    lynxe Bit Poster

    15
    0
    4
    Hi all,

    I have experience with HTML/CSS and have made a few websites and know my way around a computer but when it comes to other programming languages I haven't a clue.

    I was advised to learn .net/asp from an employer and I have decided it's what I am going to do.

    Can anyone recommend some certs I can get that will get me upto speed and make me look qualified in using them?
    I am finishing my degree in IT computing next year but the .net/asp material is very limited - I have time to kill until then so would like to get learning.

    Also how much would it typically cost for a beginner?
    I have a lot of spare time right now so I could be learning for upto 6-7 hours a day if I really wanted to.
     
  2. wagnerk
    Highly Decorated Member Award

    wagnerk aka kitkatninja Moderator

    10,831
    357
    341
    You could do the following (I suggest the study for the MTA certification route, because it is a more structured approach with something to aim for):

    Download the following for free: Visual Studio 2010 Express
    Purchase the following books for 2 MTA exams: Software Development Fundamentals and .Net Fundamentals
    Download the free study guides for the required exams from Certiport here

    Take the 98-361 and 98-372 MTA exams at your local Certiport testing centre.

    Decide where you want to go... Eg Web development, Windows Development, Mobile Development or even Games Development.

    Then study for that route :)

    As for cost, the software is free as is the study guide. The books are about £30 each, plus you have the cost of the exam(s). So really minimum cost per exam (excluing time) would be about £80-£90, depending on how much the individual charges for the MTA exam.
     
    Certifications: CITP, PGCert, BSc, HNC, LCGI, PTLLS, MCT, MCITP, MCTS, MCSE, MCSA:M, MCSA, MCDST, MCP, MTA, MCAS, MOS (Master), A+, N+, S+, ACA, VCA, etc... & 2nd Degree Black Belt
    WIP: PGDip
  3. lynxe

    lynxe Bit Poster

    15
    0
    4
    Thanks very much for the info wagnerk, just what I needed.

    Sounds like a good plan and I'll get right on it.
     
  4. lynxe

    lynxe Bit Poster

    15
    0
    4
    Just looking at the exams and see there is 2 version of each, one for VB and c#.

    What is the best one to pick, and do those books cover each one or would I need to purchase different books if I only wanted to learn c#? (my friend is telling me to go with c#).
     
  5. ade1982

    ade1982 Megabyte Poster Forum Leader

    566
    12
    52
    .NET gives you a choice of what to program in, so you can either have C# or VB.NET (amongst others, like F#, JScript.NET etc). It's a matter of preference what you want to use, but C# seems to be where most jobs are. A friend, who leads a team of programmers working with .NET, has just told me on Skype that might be the best option too.

    Don't know about the books, but I am sure a quick google or Amazon search would tell you.
     
  6. lynxe

    lynxe Bit Poster

    15
    0
    4
    Thanks!

    Any idea how long it would take to get those certificates for a complete beginner in those areas?
    Is less than 6 months do-able or are we talking a year atleast?
     
  7. ade1982

    ade1982 Megabyte Poster Forum Leader

    566
    12
    52
    All depends how you get on with understanding programming in the language. Programming is very much one of those "you can, or you can't" type things.

    Obviously follow the examples in the books, but it would be really useful to do a bigger project. So for example, when we did the .NET framework in Uni, the project was to build a messaging system, a bit like Windows Live Messenger, but in C#, making the right calls, etc.

    There are some classic projects - like in Java, you would implement a calculator, as it allows you to do the object oriented things, such as variable casting, inheritance, polymorphism etc. No reason why you can't do something similar in C#.

    Once you can program proficiently, then worry about certifications. See the certification as more like a confirmation that you can do some basic level programming in .NET
     
  8. lynxe

    lynxe Bit Poster

    15
    0
    4
    Great thanks for all the info!
     
  9. lynxe

    lynxe Bit Poster

    15
    0
    4
    Oh btw - do these certificates need renewed every couple of years like the A+ N+ etc?
     
  10. wagnerk
    Highly Decorated Member Award

    wagnerk aka kitkatninja Moderator

    10,831
    357
    341
    The MTA's require renewal every 5 years, but by then (hopefully) you'll have the experience and be going for the MCTS and higher certs :)
     
    Certifications: CITP, PGCert, BSc, HNC, LCGI, PTLLS, MCT, MCITP, MCTS, MCSE, MCSA:M, MCSA, MCDST, MCP, MTA, MCAS, MOS (Master), A+, N+, S+, ACA, VCA, etc... & 2nd Degree Black Belt
    WIP: PGDip
  11. JonnyMX

    JonnyMX Petabyte Poster

    5,239
    211
    236
    If you're a complete beginner to programming then you may want to start on something a bit more generic before you tie yourself into a certain language.

    I started out with the Open University and did a very good course on object orientation and program design in general.
    Without that, I don't ever think I would have got my head around any of the concepts involved in .net.

    I guess for you the downside there will be time, as you can't really hurry an OU course because you have time on your hands.
    The cost though is also pretty good compared to training providers. On average you'll pay about £1000 for an academic year at the OU (including all materials and exams etc) which is pretty good compared to a TP charging between £3000-8000 for a course.

    It'll also give you some idea if programming is for you.
    It isn't for everyone.
     
    Certifications: MCT, MCTS, i-Net+, CIW CI, Prince2, MSP, MCSD
  12. lynxe

    lynxe Bit Poster

    15
    0
    4
    Hi guys,
    Old bump here.

    So I took JonnyMX advice in the above post and started at the Open Uni.
    I am doing software development course which right now, involves mainly Java (no .net or c#)

    I am just talking to someone about a placement and I am now researching the certificates again (even though I won't be doing them for another year yet).
    Do the same certs above still apply to me for .net/c#, or is there newer ones out now - and is the expiry still 5 years?

    Thanks!
     
  13. dmarsh

    dmarsh Terabyte Poster

    3,782
    302
    184
    Last edited: May 1, 2013
    Certifications: CITP, BSc, HND, SCJP, SCJD, SCWCD, SCBCD, SCEA, N+, Sec+, Proj+, Server+, Linux+, MCTS, MCPD, MCSA, MCITP, CCDH

Share This Page

Loading...