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Bandwidth question

Discussion in 'Networks' started by kobem, Jun 2, 2009.

  1. kobem

    kobem Megabyte Poster

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    Hi again to all people in here. Only cares about a question that is in being curiousity. Wait

    I know what the bandwidth is .The thing i wonder is something else. When we set up a connection
    (assume DSL connection type) for instance a web server, lets say my downstream/upstream speed is 1024/256 Kbps.

    first question : communicating with the web server has same steps on both downstream and upstream events ?

    second question : At the time i connect to a web server, my ISP has given me 1024 Kbps (equal to 128 KBps)
    and that time, not many people connect to this web server. 2 seconds later, some more people tried to connect and
    the amount of data being transferred to me decreased. For example from 20 K to 10 K. The thing i wondered
    is the bridge here.(Consider the web server is also in my country)

    which bridge ?

    my computer --- ISP --- web server

    among which, is this amount of data decreased? between my computer and ISP or ISP and web server ?
    If answer is the second one, does it also affect the amount of data on the first?
     
    Certifications: CCNA
  2. greenbrucelee
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    greenbrucelee Zettabyte Poster

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    as soon as the servers resources are being consumed then the speed to everyone will drop.
     
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  3. Sparky
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    Sparky Zettabyte Poster Moderator

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    As your web server is returing data to the client the upstream will be an issue here.


    Most likely your upstream bandwidth is being saturated here. It does depend on the complexity of the web site to be honest, if it simple HTML you will find that the page will load up quicky however if the site is more complex then the time beteen the client and your web server to load up the page will be much longer and therefore eat your bandwidth.

    For serious web hosting ADSL is not an option, you would at least be looking at a SDSL service.
     
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  4. Sparky
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    Sparky Zettabyte Poster Moderator

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    Depends on the setup surely? Kobem might have a 3 node cluster setup in his living room. :biggrin
     
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  5. greenbrucelee
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    greenbrucelee Zettabyte Poster

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    yeah, he might also have super air conditioning unit with one of those jobbies that sucks the oxygen out of the room in 30 seconds if there is a fire strapped to his roof :D
     
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  6. kobem

    kobem Megabyte Poster

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    i wrote down every answer you have given to me in my head. Still can't solve the bandwidth part.

    1- Is 1024 Kbps (the downstream) between my computer and ISP or ISP and web server?
    2- Amount of data that drops is on both sides? (between my computer and ISP or ISP and web server)
     
    Certifications: CCNA
  7. dmarsh

    dmarsh Terabyte Poster

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    Kobem have you ever thought of becomming a plumber ? :D

    You are not too clear in your question, but assuming you are not talking about running your own web server from home using ADSL...

    You will have a very thin 'hosepipe' for both downloading data, as its ADSL the upload link is say a drinking straw.

    Once you get to the ISP you have a much bigger pipe, say the size of a storm sewer or drain ? This continues until you get to the remote server where it is likely that theres maybe a smaller but still reasonable size pipe, say a domestic drainage pipe.

    The transfer rates across all the different links will obviously be different, its part of the network stacks and routing equipments job to deal with all this. Also obviously you could get routed down different pipes of varrying sizes between the ISP and the remote server.

    Bottlenecks or contention can happen anywhere within a system, the server could be overloaded, or a router, etc, however the most common reason is the lowest capacity element in the system is holding the system back.

    In your case the lowest capacity element is your 'drinking straw' ADSL upload link. For your browser to return data over ADSL to a remote server will be very slow relatively.
     
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  8. kobem

    kobem Megabyte Poster

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    you exactly solved my prob. Congratulations. :)
     
    Certifications: CCNA

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