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Another Incorrect Question

Discussion in 'A+' started by supernova, Sep 3, 2008.

  1. supernova

    supernova Gigabyte Poster

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    Running through a list of test questions today, been ill so fallen back again.

    Found this one....

    What is the IP address used to test your network card to see if it is functioning properly?
    a. 169.254.0.0
    b. 192.168.0.1
    c. 255.255.255.255
    d. 127.0.0.1 <--- there answer


    I couldn't believe this, the local host isn't route'ble via any NIC, you dont even need a NIC to use it.
    So how did they work this one out. :rolleyes:

    Andi
     
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  2. Crito

    Crito Banned

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    You ping the loopback interface to test whether the IP stack is setup and configured properly. But I have to agree, the question is worded very poorly.
     
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  3. TimoftheC

    TimoftheC Kilobyte Poster

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    Erm 127.0.0.1 is the loopback adapter and is used to test a network card to make sure is functioning and installed correctly. It is an IP address set aside just for that purpose.

    Am I missing something because I would answer D to the question:oops:? Are you reading too much into the question Andi?
     
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  4. zebulebu

    zebulebu Terabyte Poster

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    Agree with Tim and Crit - the question is perfectly accurate. It may not be worded very well (in fact, it ISN'T worded very well) but it IS correct. If you ping the loopback address and don't get a response, you've got bigger problems than anything related to network connectivity - its always the first thing you should check. No response from a ping to the local loopback indicates that there is something wrong with the TCP/IP stack and no amount of fiddling with anything more complicated will resolve any issues you might be having - its time to rebuild the stack!
     
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  5. Qs

    Qs Semi-Honorary Member Gold Member

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    What more can I say? Other users type far too quickly.
     
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  6. hbroomhall

    hbroomhall Petabyte Poster Gold Member

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    In most TCP/IP stacks using the loopback address goes nowhere near any hardware. This is made clearer on Unix machines where the interface is usually something like lo0 rather than fxp0.

    This looks to me like a poorly worded question. Where did it come from?

    Harry.
     
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  7. supernova

    supernova Gigabyte Poster

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    when you Ping 127.0.0.1 it doesnt even go through a NIC so how can it test a NIC

    Like Crito said your testing the tcp/ip stack not a individual NIC

    Only way to test a NIC is to ping another PC, router or other device thats routable

    PS 127.0.0.1 is use by a lot of software including firewalls

    Andi
     
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  8. supernova

    supernova Gigabyte Poster

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    I don't really want to say lets say one of the top providers of practice questions :tune

    Andi
     
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  9. supernova

    supernova Gigabyte Poster

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    But the question is to test your network card (ie the card its self), I know where your coming form .. but i still question the validity. Its worded very badly

    Andi
     
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  10. BosonMichael
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    BosonMichael Yottabyte Poster

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    <searching our A+ product>

    Nope... it's not us! :p
     
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  11. supernova

    supernova Gigabyte Poster

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    To really test a NIC you use its assigned ip address whilst its plugged into a hub/switch or a loopback device.
     
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  12. MLP

    MLP Kilobyte Poster

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    Hi

    I agree that 127.0.0.1 is incorrect. I sometimes use laptops for web dev, often not connected to a network, yet can call up the installed web servers (IIS on windows usually, or apache on the Mac) default page with 127.0.0.1. Even with wireless switched off, and no ethernet connected. Therefore, a call to 127.0.0.1 doesn't utilise any network cards.

    Pinging 127.0.0.1 tests the IP stack, as posted previously by a couple of people, rather than the physical NIC. That said, I'd attempt ping that to see if there is a software issue, before delving further into the troubleshooting process.


    Maria
     
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  13. Bluerinse
    Honorary Member

    Bluerinse Exabyte Poster

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    I agree, it's a badly worded question.. the loopback address doesn't test hardware.

    However, there are many poorly worded questions around.. and it is clear what answer they expected you to choose.
     
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  14. Logicum

    Logicum Bit Poster

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    http://www.ping127001.com/whyping.htm

    It's what you do- you ping the loopback address of a computer to test it's internal net-worthiness. What you *call* it might be questionable- but I think in general the reader should understand that what you are testing is networking (and specifically the stack) *because* there is a communications error when trying to use the card. And I was always taught to test first at the hardware level- cables, connectors, and then travel on up through the layers before resorting to internal stack tests.

    Computer can't connect to network- "ok, I will ping so-and-so before looking at anything else"

    1 hour later...

    "oh- the cable was out!"

    :biggrin
     
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  15. supernova

    supernova Gigabyte Poster

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    I do agree... but some people use these materials, who know no different, take it as gospel.

    I actually played the Meyers AIO cd the other night i couldn't believe the mount of differences with the book and it was made by the same guy.

    Its the same between different authors of these materials, i see totally different explanations.. i am just lucky i know which is right .... i see people who know no different learning utter crap!
     
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  16. Sparky
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    Sparky Zettabyte Poster Moderator

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    Bad question although the other three potential answers are obviously wrong. Sometimes eliminating the wrong answers can help you answer this type of question even though the actual answer is questionable.
     
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  17. supernova

    supernova Gigabyte Poster

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    Yes its testing the stack not the NIC!..... the question asks you to test the NIC! .. example if you had a system with 2 NICS one worked and the other didn't ... pinging 127.0.01 would tell you jack
     
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  18. supernova

    supernova Gigabyte Poster

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    Yes but that's not the point.
     
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  19. Sparky
    Highly Decorated Member Award

    Sparky Zettabyte Poster Moderator

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    I know mate but even though the question is badly written you still have to select the “right” answer to score some points in the exam.

    Out of the four options pinging 127.0.0.1 is only feasible answer to do any testing for network connectivity.

    I agree the question as a whole is completely wrong though.
     
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  20. Logicum

    Logicum Bit Poster

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    As I said- what you (they in this case) call it might be questionable, but it should be obvious from the answers given what they are looking for. Simple. In the *real* world, as I also stated, things would be different- testing 127.0.0.1 *before* looking at the hardware layer etc would be a little premature since it only tests the stack and not the hardware.

    :blink
     
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