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Aloha!

Discussion in 'New Members Introduction' started by Happy protech, Dec 11, 2006.

  1. Happy protech

    Happy protech Bit Poster

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    Aloha everyone, :D

    I'm new to this as well, still a young buck, but chasing a career in programming. I'm currently looking at an MCDST and then planning on taking the Visual Basic qualification designing applications. :biggrin

    The trainning provider I'm looking at taking the course with are pricing the MCDST at £1600. I get telephone support with tutors and the text books included, does this seem around the buck? I dunno, it seems a litte dear to me. :(

    I never realized how expensive this game is. :dry

    Thanks for reading, looking forward to meeting some of you.
     
  2. hbroomhall

    hbroomhall Petabyte Poster Gold Member

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    Hi and welcome to CF!

    It needen't be expensive if you are prepared to put the learning work in yourself.

    I have never paid for any courses, and my main job is as a programmer.

    Harry.
     
    Certifications: ECDL A+ Network+ i-Net+
    WIP: Server+
  3. Happy protech

    Happy protech Bit Poster

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    I don't understand, how did you not pay for any? :blink
     
  4. Raffaz

    Raffaz Kebab Lover Gold Member

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    Certifications: A+, MCP, MCDST, AutoCAD
    WIP: Rennovating my house
  5. C_Eagle

    C_Eagle Byte Poster

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    Hello and welcome.

    Self study has worked for me. I'm halfway through the MCDST cert.

    Buy the Microsoft Press book and study yourself. It will save you ££££££££
     
    Certifications: A+, MCP, MCDST, 70-270
    WIP: MCSA 70-290
  6. BosonMichael
    Highly Decorated Member Award

    BosonMichael Yottabyte Poster

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    I don't know about Harry, but I've never paid for any courses because I've never taken any courses... and I'm about as certified as one can get!
     
    Certifications: CISSP, MCSE+I, MCSE: Security, MCSE: Messaging, MCDST, MCDBA, MCTS, OCP, CCNP, CCDP, CCNA Security, CCNA Voice, CNE, SCSA, Security+, Linux+, Server+, Network+, A+
    WIP: Just about everything!
  7. Happy protech

    Happy protech Bit Poster

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    Thanks so much guys! You've all made my week :D
    I was getting really down looking at the prices these courses were going to cost me, For the whole course I wanted to do it was going to cost £5700, that included the IC3 the MCDST and the visual basic. I worked for a year (16yrs-17) and managed to earn only 3/4 of that. :(

    This self-study seems to be a great idea, I'm going to look at some more courses, maybe A+ would be suitable to start of my programming qualifications? I certainly hear it an awfull lot in this catagory. Are there any other courses you'd recommend Harry for the programming, you said you're a programmer so maybe you could offer advice as to were I should start?

    You guys are great. :D - You've really put my mind at rest.

    BrainBeacon Michael, how did you get thoose qualifications without taking any courses? It's certainly an impressive list, did the army provide 'em?

    Thanks again everyone, it's been muchly appriciated.
     
  8. BosonMichael
    Highly Decorated Member Award

    BosonMichael Yottabyte Poster

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    Well, to be honest, the A+ and MCDST won't provide you much help with a programming career, if any. The A+ and MCDST are great starting points for someone wanting to get into desktop support and, later, network support. Programmers typically just hit the ground running by learning programming.

    Happy, I was largely self-taught. I got my first computer at the age of 10, was the go-to computer guy in my early 20s, and got my first "real" IT job at age 28. Years later, I've been around the virtual block a few times... including several years where I wrote IT certification practice exams. I'm currently writing a Vista study guide for Sybex, and creating content for my own budding IT certification company... all while being a network administrator for a healthcare company.

    EDIT: No, I was an intelligence analyst in the Army. They taught me Chinese rather than computers! :) And I went to school for Chemistry. Go figure!
     
    Certifications: CISSP, MCSE+I, MCSE: Security, MCSE: Messaging, MCDST, MCDBA, MCTS, OCP, CCNP, CCDP, CCNA Security, CCNA Voice, CNE, SCSA, Security+, Linux+, Server+, Network+, A+
    WIP: Just about everything!
  9. hbroomhall

    hbroomhall Petabyte Poster Gold Member

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    Simple - I self-studied. I bought the main books on the subject (OK - they cost money, but a *lot* less than a course).

    Harry.
     
    Certifications: ECDL A+ Network+ i-Net+
    WIP: Server+
  10. hbroomhall

    hbroomhall Petabyte Poster Gold Member

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    You can take certs by simply turning up (OK - sometimes you may need to book) and paying the fee. In *many* cases (but not all) there is no requirement to attend a course.

    In the programming world things are a little different. There are fewer starting-level certs, and for many computer languages there are no recognized certs at all. It is up to the prospective employer to see if you have a clue.

    First - what programming, and in what languages, have you done so far?

    Harry.
     
    Certifications: ECDL A+ Network+ i-Net+
    WIP: Server+
  11. Bluerinse
    Honorary Member

    Bluerinse Exabyte Poster

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    Welcome to the forum Hp

    Pete
     
    Certifications: C&G Electronics - MCSA (W2K) MCSE (W2K)
  12. Happy protech

    Happy protech Bit Poster

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    I've studied HTML to death, I figured thats the best place to start, I've started learning C and C#, but C# would be the best place to start for a application designer, right?

    I'm also doing a little perl, still a real newbie, so in conclusion, I would say I'm pretty good with HTML, and learning C, C# and perl.

    It's diffucult to find the right course I'm finding, with there being so many languages, so for an application designer, I'm really not sure where I should go. :rolleyes:

    Thanks for the reply's, interesting story there BrainBeacon Michael. :D
     
  13. hbroomhall

    hbroomhall Petabyte Poster Gold Member

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    Just remember not to say that in an interview. :biggrin HTML is not a programming language. It *is*, however, a markup language. Very useful to know of course!

    Depends on where you expect to be working. Remember that it is proprietary to Microsoft, and won't be found outside of Windows. This may not be a problem to you, but you need to remember this.
    Difficult to advise without knowing where you expect/want to be working. And at this stage you probably aren't sure yourself!

    I think you are taking the right approach. But rather than going for expensive training courses why not dream up a project that would stretch your abilities, and attempt to build it yourself? It doesn't matter if it is like others out there (for example a Forum software like this one), what matters is getting good hands-on with a language, and getting used to where to look for help with things.

    Harry.
     
    Certifications: ECDL A+ Network+ i-Net+
    WIP: Server+
  14. BosonMichael
    Highly Decorated Member Award

    BosonMichael Yottabyte Poster

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    I'm definitely different. heh! 8)

    Unfortunately, since I'm not a programmer, I'm not the best person to provide advice on programming tracks.
     
    Certifications: CISSP, MCSE+I, MCSE: Security, MCSE: Messaging, MCDST, MCDBA, MCTS, OCP, CCNP, CCDP, CCNA Security, CCNA Voice, CNE, SCSA, Security+, Linux+, Server+, Network+, A+
    WIP: Just about everything!
  15. Happy protech

    Happy protech Bit Poster

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    Thanks for the reply Harry, you're right I'm not sure what I want to do for a career. All I know at the moment is I wish to be a programmer. I have a couple of resources for the programming languages I'm learning, but do you have any you would recommend, Harry? Like I said, I'm by no means profficient with C, C# or perl, so If you have any links to decent resources for beginners, that'd be great, if not, no worry I have a few of my own, just wondered if there were any recommendations you may have. :D

    Thanks for all youre help so far, who needs tutors when you've got a place like this, eh? :p
     
  16. BosonMichael
    Highly Decorated Member Award

    BosonMichael Yottabyte Poster

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    If you're not proficient, the only thing that will fix that is by becoming proficient. There are a TON of C and C# resources out there (and I'm sure the same is true for Perl). I can ask my business partner what he would recommend.
     
    Certifications: CISSP, MCSE+I, MCSE: Security, MCSE: Messaging, MCDST, MCDBA, MCTS, OCP, CCNP, CCDP, CCNA Security, CCNA Voice, CNE, SCSA, Security+, Linux+, Server+, Network+, A+
    WIP: Just about everything!
  17. Happy protech

    Happy protech Bit Poster

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    I know there are lots of resources out there, I have many. I was just asking if anyone had some they would recommend. I would appriciate it if you could ask you're business partner. That'd be real kind. :D
     
  18. hbroomhall

    hbroomhall Petabyte Poster Gold Member

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    IMHO the Perl books that you *must* have on the shelf are:
    Programming Perl (popularly known as 'The Camel Book') and
    Perl Cookbook

    Both from O'Reilly

    C# I can't help with, as I have avoided that (mostly because I do most of my work on Unix these days).

    C I learnt many years ago using 'The White Book' - the classic from Kernighan & Ritchie, who invented the language. (The correct name for this book is "The C Programming Language"). This may not be the book for you - it is a little dry for some tastes.

    Harry.
     
    Certifications: ECDL A+ Network+ i-Net+
    WIP: Server+
  19. Happy protech

    Happy protech Bit Poster

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    Thanks Harry, I'll get that 'camel book' as i'm not too sure what path I wish to take I hold back a little on the C# front. What languages are good starters for a career in Linux/Unix?

    Thanks.
     
  20. hbroomhall

    hbroomhall Petabyte Poster Gold Member

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    Again IMHO - you can't go far wrong with shell, Perl and C - in no particular order.

    You will find there are 'fashions' in languages, and lots of other ones will be suggested from time to time. How long they survive except for a few die-hards is hard to predict.

    Harry.
     
    Certifications: ECDL A+ Network+ i-Net+
    WIP: Server+

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