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Advice needed from people in the IT industry

Discussion in 'Training & Development' started by misanthrope, Jul 11, 2009.

  1. misanthrope

    misanthrope Bit Poster

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    unfortunately i was recently made redundant in a career i have been in for twenty years. as time has progressed employment opportunities in my discipline have become increasing difficult, in the midst of a recession this has become worse.

    i am looking at this as an opportunity to change career into IT as its something i have an interest in & inspite of the economic climate there still seem to be plenty of opportunities. please let me know if my perception is wrong.

    my local college has a full time two year foundation degree in computers and networking, which then leads onto a BSc with an additional year. i like the idea of this course because it is accessible to non-IT students & also has work placement opportunities. it appears to cover a wide variety of topics so whatever you feel most stimulated by means you can specialise in later.

    Modules include: Software Engineering, Network Design, Construction and Management, Databases and RDBS Development, Web and Multimedia Services, Application Software Use and Configuration, and Operating System Software Use and Configuration.

    this will cost me a great deal of money all my savings, but i would consider it more of an investment than going travelling until the job market improves. i dont want to make an expensive mistake, so can you tell me the perspective from inside the IT industry, would this is be a sensible solution?

    thank you.
     
  2. jk2447

    jk2447 Petabyte Poster Moderator

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    You can't go wrong with a IT related degree but just be aware that its not a guaranteed passport into IT, it can help but just be aware. How old are you do you mind me asking?
     
    Certifications: BSc (Hons), HND IT, HND Computing, ITIL-F, MBCS CITP, MCP (270,290,291,293,294,298,299,410,411,412) MCTS (401,620,624,652) MCSA:Security, MCSE: Security, Security+, CPTS, VCP4, CCA (XenApp6.5), MCSA 2012, VCP5, VCP6-NV
  3. misanthrope

    misanthrope Bit Poster

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    38 :oops:
     
  4. BosonMichael
    Highly Decorated Member Award

    BosonMichael Yottabyte Poster

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    Is IT a great career to get into? Certainly, if you **love** computers, technology, and assisting people.

    Is IT a great career to get into if you're looking for a large starting salary? Not really, and that's why it's often difficult for older folks and career changers to make the switch to IT. There's no "starting in the middle" just because we're older... just about everyone starts at the bottom and works their way up. And there's a lot of competition at the bottom, particularly in trying to get that first IT job.

    That said, if you can afford the salary and can get your first IT job, the money will come over time, and particularly if you're passionate about what you do. :)
     
    Certifications: CISSP, MCSE+I, MCSE: Security, MCSE: Messaging, MCDST, MCDBA, MCTS, OCP, CCNP, CCDP, CCNA Security, CCNA Voice, CNE, SCSA, Security+, Linux+, Server+, Network+, A+
    WIP: Just about everything!
  5. jk2447

    jk2447 Petabyte Poster Moderator

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    Ah thats not bad mate, still young yet. As BosonMichael said above tho. IT is very much a career where we all, well 99% of us, have had to start at the bottom and work our way up. I started in IT when I was 20 as a Mainframe Operator but I have one man on my team who started in his mid 30s and is doing well for himself.

    One thing I would prepare yourself for if you really want to go ahead with your career change is getting used to young bosses. I was made a team leader at 22 and I know a few of the older members of my team weren't too sure at first. Its just the way of the industry. If you get in with a good firm like I did, IBM, they promote ability not seniority.

    I always think you will go far in life with a positive attitude so if you look at your age as meaning you are a mature sensible level headed adult instead of a barrier you'll do well for yourself like my Operator has.

    Before you spend your lifes savings on a degree have you thought about gaining Professional certifications instead / as well? A poster on here is from my Town, Liverpool, is 38 and has just passed whats generally considered the first rung on the certification ladder, CompTIA's A+ http://www.comptia.org/certifications/listed/a.aspx

    A lot of people go for A+, then N+ then move onto Microsoft certification. They can be done using home study then when you are ready you pay for your exam and go to a local testing centre which are nation wide in just about every country. Its a lot cheaper than a traditional degree and a lot of us on here are fans of home study. Try looking in the A+ sections of this forums, theirs loads of info to be had.
    Cheers,
    Jim
     
    Certifications: BSc (Hons), HND IT, HND Computing, ITIL-F, MBCS CITP, MCP (270,290,291,293,294,298,299,410,411,412) MCTS (401,620,624,652) MCSA:Security, MCSE: Security, Security+, CPTS, VCP4, CCA (XenApp6.5), MCSA 2012, VCP5, VCP6-NV
  6. misanthrope

    misanthrope Bit Poster

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    thanks, how did this chap you used as an example get his first opportunity in the industry? did he have any experience or did he just have a qualification? did he self study or do a degree?
     
  7. m3lt

    m3lt Byte Poster

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    Hey! :p

    I am happy to hear stories about people having a career change, it takes a lot of will and dedication!

    Though hope you dont mind me asking, but what was your "old" profession/skill ?

    Oh and please consider doing some self study, it will benefit you in the sense that you will develop strong discipline and will, and will save you a great deal of money. Think that to get a certification like for instance A+ you have to spend around 160 pounds (including exam fees!) it is very very appealing.
    Not to mention you will have the ability of free time schedule, so you can work on the side and still get a few bob from JSA! :twisted::biggrin

    We can help you out here with the links, books and other study materials you might need.

    So good luck! :p
     
    Certifications: A+
    WIP: N+, MCDST/MCSE
  8. misanthrope

    misanthrope Bit Poster

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    thanks, i feel the love. i have been a design engineer in refrigeration and air conditioning.

    as this foundation degree only entails 1 1/2 days study per week i would pursue self study as well.
     
  9. BosonMichael
    Highly Decorated Member Award

    BosonMichael Yottabyte Poster

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    I started in IT officially when I was 28 (though I had been the "go-to computer guy" for years prior to that). So I started later than most of the guys on here. That said, I've known more than a few get their start after age 30, and even a couple who started in their 50s! And they love it.
     
    Certifications: CISSP, MCSE+I, MCSE: Security, MCSE: Messaging, MCDST, MCDBA, MCTS, OCP, CCNP, CCDP, CCNA Security, CCNA Voice, CNE, SCSA, Security+, Linux+, Server+, Network+, A+
    WIP: Just about everything!

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