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  1. Mr.Cheeks

    Mr.Cheeks 1st ever Gold Member! Gold Member

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    Just need confirmation on something.

    i was speaking to a friend, and we wre on about ADSL lines... he said that as long as the line is ADSL enabled you can dial and use any ADSL provider on the line so; my one is UKOL so would you be able bring a modem and dial a tiscali number with the tiscali username and password and access the internet through my line??

    I thought that my line will only be avaliable for myself (UKOL) and not another BB provider... ...and thats why the MAC code is requested?

    Clarification appreciated...
     
  2. r.h.lee

    r.h.lee Gigabyte Poster

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    TheCheekMaster,

    I am trying to clarify the situation.

    Current situation:

    {Home Network}----[ADSL Modem]--------[UKOL]---{Internet}

    Friend's claim: You can make your ADSL modem connect to any other ADSL network other than UKOL? Is your friend talking about dialup internet service provider access on the voice line while the ADSL is working?
     
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  3. Boycie
    Honorary Member

    Boycie Senior Beer Tester

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    As far as i am aware that is the purpose of the mac code; to stop your line being used by other providers.

    As for dial-up networking, you are free to use whoever you wish, on the same ADSL line.

    Si
     
    Certifications: MCSA 2003, MCDST, A+, N+, CTT+, MCT
  4. Mr.Cheeks

    Mr.Cheeks 1st ever Gold Member! Gold Member

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    er not sure what you mean there mate... :oops:

    i know we are on about broadband connection

    {Home Network}----[ADSL Modem]--------[UKOL*]---{Internet}

    Where * he is saying that aslong as the line is ADSL enabled, you can connect using any ISP broadband, so Tiscali, Tesco, BT can all go there, as long as you use the other providers details... even though my line is for UKOL...

    Does that help? :rolleyes:
     
  5. Mr.Cheeks

    Mr.Cheeks 1st ever Gold Member! Gold Member

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    Thats why i thought you cant use another provider on my line..
     
  6. Boycie
    Honorary Member

    Boycie Senior Beer Tester

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    No, it won't. As far as i am aware that is the purpose of the MAC code; to prevent a customers line from being transfered without their knowledge.

    Si
     
    Certifications: MCSA 2003, MCDST, A+, N+, CTT+, MCT
  7. Mr.Cheeks

    Mr.Cheeks 1st ever Gold Member! Gold Member

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    Cheers guys, i thought that was the case, we at least this proves one thing... I am actually learning a lot for everyone here, and would like to thank everyone for their time and contributions in assisting me with my queries!

    Cheers! :thumbleft
     
  8. Boycie
    Honorary Member

    Boycie Senior Beer Tester

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    Glad it was cleared up.

    Si
     
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  9. r.h.lee

    r.h.lee Gigabyte Poster

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    TheCheekMaster,

    Yes, this helps clarify things, not by much, but at least a little bit. Disclaimer: I am not an expert at British telecoms. However, I would imagine that your friend may be right IF you also switched internet service providers at the same time. That's because I'd imagine that there's some telecom/ISP backend reconfiguration to disallow access from the old ADSL ISP and then allow access to the new ADSL ISP.

    Also, I don't know if your line is voice + ADSL or the new "naked DSL" without a voice line from your phone company/ISP.

    So in summary, I don't think it's practical to attempt to try what your friend suggests.
     
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  10. Mr.Cheeks

    Mr.Cheeks 1st ever Gold Member! Gold Member

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    no offence mate but this is getting too complicated for me... so i'll leave it as it is and try it sometime when i am at someone else's house... Thanks anyway...

    edit: btw im not giving up, im just too tired
     
  11. slyuen

    slyuen Byte Poster

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    Hi, I need to say something here...

    I understand that the MAC code's purpose is to prevent being transferred to another provider, but, I've done a little test which shows it's not effective.

    Scenario: my friend uses UKOL, I use NTL Freedom

    I used my laptop (which has my NTL broadband dialler) and my NTL USB modem (speedtouch), connected to HIS ADSL line at HIS house, clicked connect.......and have access to Internet.

    I've logged on to NTL via his UKOL ADSL line, using my username and password, and had full Internet access....etc.
     
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  12. Mr.Cheeks

    Mr.Cheeks 1st ever Gold Member! Gold Member

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    Thats what i was onabout!
     
  13. hbroomhall

    hbroomhall Petabyte Poster Gold Member

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    First - the MAC is purely a bureaucratic thing - not an engineering thing. It is a token to allow a migration from one provider to another. And it has a limited life (about 2 weeks if memory serves).

    Second - despite the use of the DUN software, you don't 'dial' ADSL. The use of DUN is just to get round the limitations of USB when used for networking. The 'number' entered in the dial box may or may not have any relevance to anything (depends on the modem).

    The auth mechanism is in fact RADIUS. Yes - it is possible in certain circumstances to use your account at another house, but this is because of the way BT have set the systems up. Very approximately the rules for this to work are 1) You must be on the same exchange. 2) You must have the same 'type' of ADSL. What 'type' means here is somewhat complicated.

    BT does a limited auth check when you log on, enough to confirm which 'type' you are and which pipe to send it to. The main auth is done by the ISP.

    This only works if you are both 'option 4' ADSL customers. This means that BT wholesale actualy does the connection, and the ISP buys from them. UKOL also do 'option 2', where the exchange has UKOL kit installed. If that was the case then the attempt to use the account at another house won't work.

    Harry.
     
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  14. jodsclass

    jodsclass Byte Poster

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    Thats what I was going to say. If you are on similar packages, which are based on a similar wholesale adsl brand (such as BT Wholesale) I can see this working just fine. After all you are logging onto the same network essentially. I assume you would face problems for instance if you are on 512k adsl and your pal is on say 2mb adsl as your speed profiles set at isp level would not match with your login details. Also I can see this not working if your friend used an alternate provider such as an LLU service (bulldog etc).

    Always worth playing with these things though, its how so much knowledge is generated. Play away with it and let us know your results.

    Jodsclass
     
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  15. Boycie
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    Boycie Senior Beer Tester

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    ah ha, so there is a bit more to it then. Thanks for the explanation Harry. As for the fact that the MAC only *lives* for around 2 weeks, i take it the reluctance to receive from the *lost* ISP is just a plea to hold on to you?

    Si
     
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  16. hbroomhall

    hbroomhall Petabyte Poster Gold Member

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    Actualy - the main reason for the limited life of the MAC is to avoid old ones clogging the system up and being misused, as far as I know.

    There are strict rules for the operators involved in the MAC scheme about how they run it.

    Harry.
     
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  17. Boycie
    Honorary Member

    Boycie Senior Beer Tester

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    ah, right. Thanks for explaining.

    Si
     
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  18. Sparky
    Highly Decorated Member Award

    Sparky Zettabyte Poster Moderator

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    Yup, good point.

    If you want to change broadband provider you need to give the MAC code to the new provider and then reconfigure your modem, in some cases all you need to do is change your username and password for the new provider. 8)
     
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  19. Bluerinse
    Honorary Member

    Bluerinse Exabyte Poster

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    What is this MAC code thing? I don't think we have it here, or at least I have never heard of it except with some cable providers :blink
     
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  20. hbroomhall

    hbroomhall Petabyte Poster Gold Member

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    MAC = Migration Authorization Code.

    It is a long series of letters and numbers issued by the losing ISP, which you give to the gaining ISP.

    It only works with ISPs that are part of an agreement - if your current ISP isn't part of it then they won't issue one.

    It enables a 'fast track' changeover of ISPs by BT - frequently measured in minutes rather than the several days required for a 'cease' and 'provide'.

    It is (obviously) a UK thing. :biggrin

    Harry.
     
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