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Adobe is slowly but surely learning

Discussion in 'The Lounge - Off Topic' started by ffreeloader, May 3, 2008.

  1. ffreeloader

    ffreeloader Terabyte Poster

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    Adobe still has a way to go, but they are making moves to start opening up their technologies, and getting away from proprietary software and draconian licensing schemes. This is the third move they've made in the last few months. They actually open sourced some of their Flash-related technology a while back.

    You can read the rest of this article at Ryan Stewart's ZDNet Blog.
     
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  2. Mitzs
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    Mitzs Ducktape Goddess

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    I guess that is good for linux users, or does flash work pretty good already on linux systems? I can't see them doing it though with the rest of their software. They make good money off of Photoshop, Dreamweaver, and I am finding the InDesign is a big thing to.
     
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  3. tripwire45
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    tripwire45 Zettabyte Poster

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    As various distros of Linux become more popular in the desktop market, application developers would be wise to consider jumping on the bandwagon rather than assume those Linux users will always have to get a Mac or Windows box in order to use their wares.
     
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  4. Mitzs
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    Mitzs Ducktape Goddess

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    I agree with you. Linux has a pretty big fan base that they are worth noting and including like they do windows and macs. The thing is though Linux comes in many flavors. How does one choose which platform to write for? Do they all basicially have the same foundation?
     
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  5. tripwire45
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    tripwire45 Zettabyte Poster

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    Mitzs. the Linux OS kernel is the same for all the various (up-to-date) distros. A distro is more about how the GUI presents, how software is managed, where you can find stuff, and a bit of branding. Under the hood, it's the same "Linux", so writing apps for Linux isn't really a chore. In fact, it should be easier than writing for Windows, because the Linux kernel is all open source...that is to say...anyone can see *all* of the code that makes up Linux at any time.
     
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  6. ffreeloader

    ffreeloader Terabyte Poster

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    I'll agree with Trip. In Linux an application in Gentoo is pretty much exactly the same application it is RedHat. The difference between the two is how the two distros install it--their package management systems, and exactly where they install it in the file system. The source code for the application is the same.

    In Gentoo you download the source code and compile it right on your computer. In RedHat, RedHat compiles the source code into binary files, packages them in a .rpm file. The user downloads the binary file and uses Yum, I think, to install the binary files. That's pretty much the only difference.
     
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  7. neutralhills

    neutralhills Kilobyte Poster

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    Who do I have to kill to get a Linux version of PS?
     
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