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Adding pc to domain

Discussion in 'Software' started by twizzle, Oct 2, 2010.

  1. twizzle

    twizzle Gigabyte Poster

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    OK i'm trying to configure my home server again using w2k3. Have it set up as the DC but not DNS server, using my router to handle dns.
    The DNS of the server is set to 127.0.0.1 and ip of 192.168.1.20 and teh domain is called home.test

    When i try to add my W7 pc to the domain home.test i get
    The following error occurred when DNS was queried for the service location (SRV) resource record used to locate an Active Directory Domain Controller (AD DC) for domain "home.test":

    The error was: "DNS name does not exist."
    (error code 0x0000232B RCODE_NAME_ERROR)

    The query was for the SRV record for _ldap._tcp.dc._msdcs.home.test

    Common causes of this error include the following:

    - The DNS SRV records required to locate a AD DC for the domain are not registered in DNS. These records are registered with a DNS server automatically when a AD DC is added to a domain. They are updated by the AD DC at set intervals. This computer is configured to use DNS servers with the following IP addresses:

    192.168.1.1
    192.168.1.20

    - One or more of the following zones do not include delegation to its child zone:

    home.test
    test
    . (the root zone)

    Now the W7 pc is on 192.168.1.3 and has its dns set as shown in teh error message. I can ping the server by IP and name. So what have i missed?
     
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  2. SimonD

    SimonD Terabyte Poster Moderator

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    What you've missed is the fact that you need to be using the DNS of the Domain you're trying to join or the DNS you are using has the ability to provide SRV records and Dynamic Updates.

    If I were you I would use Forwarders on your DC and set the home DNS servers to use the DC and anything outside of the local DNS would be sent out to either OpenDNS or your ISP DNS servers.

    Its far easier to provide external DNS resolution via your DC than it is to configure your router to handle SRV and Dynamic updates.
     
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  3. ChrisH1979

    ChrisH1979 Byte Poster

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    Only point you clients at the DCs DNS and then use the external DNS as a forwarder for that server.
     
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  4. twizzle

    twizzle Gigabyte Poster

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    Ok so as i read in my previous thread then (yes i forgot to set it as a dns server) I point primary dns on tis server to its loop back and 2ndry to my router or external ISP dns? I tried teh routers dns but it doesnt like that. I dont quite understand all tis dns forwarding and reverse lookups.
    Then do i point the client pcs to teh dns of the server as primary and routers dns as 2ndry?
     
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  5. ChrisH1979

    ChrisH1979 Byte Poster

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    Do it like this:
    Server DNS 127.0.0.1

    Forwarder tab on the DNS server properties ISP DNS server ip address. If your router does not tell you this then google on how to find this.

    Clients DNS to server only.
    Reverse lookups will convert IP to DNS not too important in a small setup , but only a few mouse clicks to enable.
     
    Last edited: Oct 2, 2010
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  6. Theprof

    Theprof Petabyte Poster Forum Leader

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    Here's what I did for my setup at home:

    My DNS server is a Domain Controller as well. You obviously have to give the server a static IP address along with the subnet, and default gateway (which is my router) and the DNS IP address should be a 127.0.0.1 address.

    Then under DNS Properties -> the forwarders tab, add the router or your ISP's DNS server IP address.

    P.S on the DNS server you don't need to at an alternative DNS IP address. Just 127.0.0.1 will do.
     
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  7. twizzle

    twizzle Gigabyte Poster

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    I tried teh routers dns but teh DC didnt liek it. Cant remember the exact message so will need to try again in morn. I'm just asking a i'm sure i read on set up that the DC didnt need to be a DNS server, yet it seems it does.
     
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  8. Theprof

    Theprof Petabyte Poster Forum Leader

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    You install a DNS server on the DC to make it Active Directory Integrated DNS zones... I think that unless you have certain requirements, it's a good practice to have the DNS server on a DC.

    If your router doesn't work as the forwarder, than try a public DNS IP like 4.2.2.2 or so...
     
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  9. Bluerinse
    Honorary Member

    Bluerinse Exabyte Poster

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    In your set up the DC definitely needs to be a DNS server.

    When you promote a windows server to a DC you then bring AD (Active Directory) into play. AD relies *heavily* on having an *internal* DNS server that has records of which servers are domain controllers capable of dealing with user authentication (log ons) etc.. these are known as SRV records and they are usually created dynamically on a Windows box.

    As has been said, your DC should be the DNS server that resolves DNS queries for your local network (LAN) and you can use forwarders (a tab in the properties of the DNS server) to pass queries that it cant answer to a DNS server that can. ie your ISPs or OpenDNS etc.
     
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  10. SimonD

    SimonD Terabyte Poster Moderator

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    You need to set the forwarder on your DC to use your ISP's DNS servers, not your routers DNS entry.

    As far as your clients are concerned, you really should be using DHCP to issue IP addressing, if you are then you need to set their DNS settings to that of the server (and not 127.0.0.1 as that would only resolve to the local machine (hence local loopback)).

    Trust me, having the DC acting as your forwarder to all external DNS queries does work but only if you also have your clients configured correctly.

    As a side note, I always set my server IP addresses to use the proper IP address rather than the loopback address because then you don't get into the habit of using 127.0.0.1 and configure that incorrectly on other machines.
     
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  11. twizzle

    twizzle Gigabyte Poster

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    All my Pcs have static IPs i'm not using DHCP. Mainly due to having things like the Blu-ray player, Wii, PS3 Xbox, Ipod, printer and phone all on my network as well. Static Ips just means i find it easier setting the stuff up.

    Ok so i think i've got it, just point the forward DNS to my ISPs DNS and the Servers DNS to its own IP or loopback address. Well i'll take it from here. Be sure i'll be asking more.
     
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  12. ChrisH1979

    ChrisH1979 Byte Poster

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    ...... and your clients to the server IP.
     
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  13. Sparky
    Highly Decorated Member Award

    Sparky Zettabyte Poster Moderator

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    The advice so far has been spot on.

    If you look at the error message the home.test domain is not available.

    Does your router know about home.test? No
    Does your ISPs DNS servers know about home.test? No
    Does your DC\Internal DNS know about home.test? Yes

    Hence why the clients on the LAN need to use the internal DNS server to resolve the internal domain name and then anything that can’t be resolved (e.g www.google.co.uk) is then forwared onto an external DNS server.
     
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