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absolute begginer

Discussion in 'Scripting & Programming' started by the_beast, Mar 8, 2008.

  1. the_beast

    the_beast Bit Poster

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    i am interested in learning programming. i want to learn something useful and i am willing to put hrs into it. i am going to do a MSC in computers and management in september. i want to learn programming as i feel it will be very useful.

    1) how hard/easy is learning java.
    2) is it something that comes naturally to you.
     
  2. harpistic

    harpistic Byte Poster

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    It really depends on you and what your aptitude is for a language like Java.

    Did you get anywhere with SQL Server/Oracle by the way, or did you abandon that route?
     
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  3. the_beast

    the_beast Bit Poster

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    after completing my economicss degree i decided to go into IT (after doing some voluntary work within the IT sector) because i hated finance. i was about to sign up for one of those training venders like advent and james thornton but i did my research and decided against it. I want to get into the consulting side of I.T so Instead ive decided to do an MSC in IS and management at warwick.

    The course is SAP orientated and you get hands on experience with other technology such as SQL. You dont get the certs but this is not important right now because the certs are no good without the experience.

    I have little programming experience but ive always been interested. I feel that learning some programming will be very useful in the future. I would like some advise as to what to learn. My research suggests that if you know JAVA you can transfer your skills to others such as C++.

    People have told me that you dont need to be a good programmer to be good/enjoy at IT? does anyone agree. ive always had the impression that programming is a core skill within IT and it should be learned.
     
  4. harpistic

    harpistic Byte Poster

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    That's only valid if you want to become a programmer, however there are many career paths within IT which do not involve programming, or at least as the core skill.
     
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  5. the_beast

    the_beast Bit Poster

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    i would still like to learn because it interests me. im willing to put the hrs in.
     
  6. hbroomhall

    hbroomhall Petabyte Poster Gold Member

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    Absolutely.

    There are many aspects to IT, and programming is only one of them.

    You can be a first rate builder of networks, for example, without needing any programming.

    Harry.
     
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  7. hbroomhall

    hbroomhall Petabyte Poster Gold Member

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    In that case Java is certainly one possibility. Because it is 'Object Orientated', a familiarity with it will help you with other languages of that type, such as C++, C#, Ruby etc.

    Harry.
     
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  8. Unemployed Diogenes

    Unemployed Diogenes Nibble Poster

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    I learnt a bit of Java in evening school. I have kind of certificate of it, but I don't like programming. I like more solve system problems and networking and things like that.

    8 hrs or more a day only writing code is nothing for me.

    But maybe you like it and it's the perfect job for you. Is so, go for it!!

    Succes
     
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  9. BosonMichael
    Highly Decorated Member Award

    BosonMichael Yottabyte Poster

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    I've never programmed in Java, so I can't answer the first question. I can, however, answer the second question: something that comes naturally to me may or may not come naturally to you, and vice versa. It all depends on our individual likes, dislikes, and aptitudes. What one person does well, another might struggle with.
     
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