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About Cisco Course

Discussion in 'Training & Development' started by dolphin_m70, Jul 15, 2008.

  1. dolphin_m70

    dolphin_m70 New Member

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    hi
    Im new to this forum, thank you all for this good and helpful forum.
    I am currently for a non - IT organisation. but want to pursue my career in IT.
    i want to know the institutions which provide cisco training and as well experience.Im a graduate in computers
    do i have to learn A+,N+,MCSE and all before doing CCNA. is it a must bcoz i went to some institutions which provide all this for around 6000-10000 pounds which i cant afford.
    could anyone plz help me where to start.
    thx
    :D
     
  2. UKDarkstar
    Honorary Member

    UKDarkstar Terabyte Poster

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    CCNA is really only going to be of use if you are working in a Cisco environment.

    The other certs you mention will be far more useful for general IT. Depending on your degree course you will need to evaluate whether or not the courses are useful or just duplicating knowledge you already have. As for MCSE, if you search the forums you will find numerous threads detailing who this is aimed at - predominantly people who have been working in a server environment for at least a year.

    A+ etc. would perhaps get you into an entry level postion (as would MCDST)
     
    Certifications: BA (Hons), MBCS, CITP, MInstLM, ITIL v3 Fdn, PTLLS, CELTA
    WIP: CMALT (about to submit), DTLLS (on hold until 2012)
  3. greenbrucelee
    Highly Decorated Member Award

    greenbrucelee Zettabyte Poster

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    What he said ^

    Welcome:)
     
    Certifications: A+, N+, MCDST, Security+, 70-270
    WIP: 70-620 or 70-680?
  4. kevicho

    kevicho Gigabyte Poster

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    I wouldnt say A+ or Network+ is a prerequisite for this course, what i would say is knowing what i know from doing these, and also experience in the field has made most of the subjects so far be a lot more digestable.

    Look at it this way, say you are a trainee mechanic, would you be able, or be sane, to try stripping an engine straight away?

    The answer is no, simply because in fairness you dont know what you are doing, but more importantly you dont know what effect on the other systems your work is having.

    Im not going to say dont do cisco, what I would say look at this page as a test (this is the basic cisco exam, not CCNA)

    http://www.cisco.com/web/learning/le3/current_exams/640-822.html

    That is a list of items you will be tested on (for CCENT, which is the level below CCNA), if that flies way over your head then I would say Network+ would give you good grounding on a lot of that, then you may be ready to move into it.

    Although CCNA will not guarantee you a job, and at interviews you may be asked questions re your Cisco experience and some employers will probably not be willing to take the risk on someone without experience in the field.
     
    Certifications: A+, Net+, MCSA Server 2003, 2008, Windows XP & 7 , ITIL V3 Foundation
    WIP: CCNA Renewal
  5. BosonMichael
    Highly Decorated Member Award

    BosonMichael Yottabyte Poster

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    Solid advice given above. :)
     
    Certifications: CISSP, MCSE+I, MCSE: Security, MCSE: Messaging, MCDST, MCDBA, MCTS, OCP, CCNP, CCDP, CCNA Security, CCNA Voice, CNE, SCSA, Security+, Linux+, Server+, Network+, A+
    WIP: Just about everything!
  6. Finkenstein

    Finkenstein Kilobyte Poster

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    I know it's really all been said above me, but I'm enrolled in the Cisco Academy at my college (it actually counts as credits towards my degree). We had people in the class with very minimal knowledge to networking and they were forced to drop in the very beginning because they couldn't keep up. You really need to have a basic understanding of things. I would think that the N+ would be a great primer for some concepts. Also, just basic network knowledge would pay off... if you don't know what ipconfig is, or the function of a gateway or subnet mask, then you really would start the studies off on the wrong foot.

    Just my 2 cents... I'll be awaiting my change. :)
     
    Certifications: MCP, Network+, CCENT, ITIL v3
    WIP: 640-822
  7. kevicho

    kevicho Gigabyte Poster

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    Great post, just like to say Kudos to the people who tried but had to drop out, its great they are trying to get into IT and hopefully they will try again but start at a proper foundation level, and then build up to CCNA
     
    Certifications: A+, Net+, MCSA Server 2003, 2008, Windows XP & 7 , ITIL V3 Foundation
    WIP: CCNA Renewal
  8. kevicho

    kevicho Gigabyte Poster

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    I dont think this is necessarily true, there are lots of network concepts in the certification which are not just applicable to Cisco, such as routing protocols, IP & subnetting (VLSM), so there is value from a learning point of view, even if you dont necessarily use cisco products.

    Plus a lot of networks today run Cisco, so you may open another door when you come to your next role, or indeed when its time to upgrade the network the knowledge could come in handy.
     
    Certifications: A+, Net+, MCSA Server 2003, 2008, Windows XP & 7 , ITIL V3 Foundation
    WIP: CCNA Renewal
  9. BosonMichael
    Highly Decorated Member Award

    BosonMichael Yottabyte Poster

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    The CCNA isn't just a bunch of concepts; it's more about how those concepts relate to implementing them on Cisco gear. Thus, it's not very useful if you don't have a lick of Cisco experience.

    If you want general knowledge, that's what Network+ is for... not the CCNA.
     
    Certifications: CISSP, MCSE+I, MCSE: Security, MCSE: Messaging, MCDST, MCDBA, MCTS, OCP, CCNP, CCDP, CCNA Security, CCNA Voice, CNE, SCSA, Security+, Linux+, Server+, Network+, A+
    WIP: Just about everything!
  10. grim

    grim Gigabyte Poster

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    yup it only covers very basic networking as it assumes you have prior networking knowledge. it covers how to use cisco equipment so the N+ is a pretty vital pre-requisit if you have no experience and looking to get into cisco.

    Grim
     
    Certifications: Bsc, 70-270, 70-290, 70-291, 70-293, 70-294, 70-298, 70-299, 70-620, 70-649, 70-680
    WIP: 70-646, 70-640
  11. dolphin_m70

    dolphin_m70 New Member

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    hi
    Thx all for such valuable advice. actually, i have completed my computer science degree then done a diploma course in hardware and networking, so have a basic knowledge of how things work and have concept in networking.
    Im wondering if anyone cud suggest a gud place to start preparation for this course like any institutions in the UK which helps in gaining experience as well.

    thx
     

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