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A networking Question

Discussion in 'Networks' started by BeerMatt, Aug 25, 2005.

  1. BeerMatt

    BeerMatt Bit Poster

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    Hi everyone
    Just started my first year of mcse/mcsa corse work so go easy on the tech terms.
    Im trying to score some brownie points at work, were showing our Fixed Odds Betting Terminals (FOBT) in October which are basically betting games run on a terminal networked to a pc with acces to the server/internet through a router, the terminals are usually set ip addresses of 192.168.0.15 , 16 , 17 respectivly, the pc 192.168.0.2 , and the router 192.168.0.1.
    At the show we will be given one RJ45 socket connected to the Broad Band connection from the router in the building ( The incoming BB will be split between several stands showing various gaming eqipment from other companys) but we want to connect 2 PC's and 6 terminals, im guessing that we connect an 8 way hub to the one connection fronm the BB in the building. What i want to know is what IP addresses will have to be set and how do you work it out?
    I may not have worded this too correctly so any help apriciated
    cheers
     
    WIP: A+ Network+ MCSE
  2. tripwire45
    Honorary Member

    tripwire45 Zettabyte Poster

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    Sounds like the connection you will be provided with for the Internet will be assigning IP addresses via DHCP. The line coming into the building from the telco will be going into a router and that device will be handing out IPs on a subnet similar to the one you describe (192.168.x.x). If that's true, all you have to do is make sure all of your devices are configured to pick up dynamic addressing. After that, hook all your devices to a hub or small switch and connect that device to the connection provided and bingo, you should be in business.
     
    Certifications: A+ and Network+
  3. BeerMatt

    BeerMatt Bit Poster

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    Thanks trip you make it sound so easy, I think sometimes i look too deep and get a little lost
    Cheers for the help :thumbleft
     
    WIP: A+ Network+ MCSE
  4. tripwire45
    Honorary Member

    tripwire45 Zettabyte Poster

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    The people at the show won't deliberately make it hard for you to hit the Internet. Usually hosts like convention centers provide information to the guests about how to access services. Let us know how it goes.
     
    Certifications: A+ and Network+
  5. Pete01

    Pete01 Kilobyte Poster

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    If you can try and avoid using a hub, use a switch instead.
     
    Certifications: MCP (NT4) CCNA
    WIP: 70-669, Learning MSI packaging
  6. drum_dude

    drum_dude Gigabyte Poster

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    Am I right in thinking that the term hub can be mistankenly used to describe a switch...most nowaday hubs are in fact switches!
     
    Certifications: MCSA , N+, A+ ,ITIL V2, MCTS
    WIP: MCITP 2008 Ent Admin, Server Admin, Exchange 2010, Lync 2010, CCNA & VCP5
  7. Pete01

    Pete01 Kilobyte Poster

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    I'd make sure it was definitely a switch even if it was a switch called a hub :blink
     
    Certifications: MCP (NT4) CCNA
    WIP: 70-669, Learning MSI packaging
  8. Bluerinse
    Honorary Member

    Bluerinse Exabyte Poster

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    I don't think it will matter much on a network of this size :rolleyes:
     
    Certifications: C&G Electronics - MCSA (W2K) MCSE (W2K)
  9. tripwire45
    Honorary Member

    tripwire45 Zettabyte Poster

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    One of the big advantages of a switch over a hub is that you don't experience packet collisions because each computer connected to a switch has a point-to-point connection between the two of them that defines their collision domain. A hub isn't an intellegent devices so all of the computers connected to the hub are part of the same collision domain. I agree with Bluerinse though since in this case, not enough computers will be connected to make any difference.
     
    Certifications: A+ and Network+
  10. Bluerinse
    Honorary Member

    Bluerinse Exabyte Poster

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    Thanks Trip!

    In the past most people used hubs because switches were very expensive, now they are cheap it makes sense to use switches but a hub is fine for small networks and home use IMHO.

    Pete
     
    Certifications: C&G Electronics - MCSA (W2K) MCSE (W2K)
  11. Pete01

    Pete01 Kilobyte Poster

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    It probably won't matter, as there won't be that many collisions on a network of that size so go ahead and get a hub.

    Personally I'd never buy a hub not even for my home network while there are switches out there for the same price as hubs, but that's just me.
     
    Certifications: MCP (NT4) CCNA
    WIP: 70-669, Learning MSI packaging

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