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70-680 and 1st line support.

Discussion in 'General Microsoft Certifications' started by shocksl, May 21, 2012.

  1. shocksl

    shocksl Byte Poster

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    okay fellas

    As some of you guys maybe aware that i am studying for my 70-680.

    I have never worked in the I.T sector. I do have good customer service skills through working in banks/ call cetres etc.

    My question is, would this study/ cert equip with some solid understanding/ knowledge in working in 1st line support?

    Yes I know experience is more important, but surely i need to start somewhere.

    I hope sombody can shed some light on this.

    thanks
     
  2. BB88

    BB88 Kilobyte Poster Gold Member

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    I would go for the CompTIA A+ Certification to start off with, as the 70-680 is more geared to somebody already working in an IT environment. The A+ will give you a solid technical foundation to build upon.

    I would recommended the following as your training resources:

    Good luck!
     
    Certifications: AS Computing, A+, Network+, 70-680, 70-410
    WIP: MCSA: Server 2012
    shocksl likes this.
  3. jvanassen

    jvanassen Kilobyte Poster

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    Agreed with above.

    I'm also a new starter into IT and I did the A+ & N+ and managed to pick up a job with them.

    I did a post in the employment and jobs section about how I went about it all, which might help you.
     
    Certifications: CompTIA A+, Network+, CCENT
    WIP: ICND2 200-101
    shocksl likes this.
  4. shocksl

    shocksl Byte Poster

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    thank you soo much^^

    what benifit would I get from the comptia stuff? is it more practical in tersm of skills required for a support role than the 70-680?
     
  5. ade1982

    ade1982 Megabyte Poster Forum Leader

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    The A+ and N+ are basic exams, which are meant to be vendor neutral. So it's more about the fundamentals of what is a router?, what is a switch? for the N+, identifying different hard drive specs like IDE and SATA, etc., basic troubleshooting, printers etc. for the A+

    The CompTIA site has the objectives for the exams in total. Think it might have a practice test too.
     
    shocksl likes this.
  6. BB88

    BB88 Kilobyte Poster Gold Member

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    The 70-680 is geared to supporting Windows 7 in a Domain Environment. A typical First Line Support Role wouldn't necessary cover this; it may do.
     
    Certifications: AS Computing, A+, Network+, 70-680, 70-410
    WIP: MCSA: Server 2012
    shocksl likes this.
  7. RichyV

    RichyV Megabyte Poster Forum Leader

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    Hi shocksl,
    I must extend my apologies to you, as through our previous conversations I never picked-up on you not having worked in IT previously, therefore I don't think that I have necessarily given you the best advice.
    MS themselves always give an indication of how long you should have been working with/on the specific technology before you embark on the certification for it. Although, I still hold that there has to be a starting place and it was MS themselves that removed the MCDST which was much more geared to "1st IT certification" than the 'entry-level, but not really...' 70-680 exam. So you can see that it is now rather difficult to 'break into' the MS certification route for non-IT starters.

    It may very well be that the A+ & than N+ is a better starting point for you. I'd get on that forum and ask the helpful people what they think.

    As I said, I'm very sorry if I've not steered you in the right direction previously...
     
    Certifications: B.Sc.(Hons), MBCS. MCP (271,272), MCDST, MCTS (680), MCITP:EDST7, MCSA:WIN7, MCPS, MCNPS
    WIP: 70-686, then onto MCSE: Desktop Infrastructure via MCSA: Server 2012...
    shocksl likes this.
  8. shocksl

    shocksl Byte Poster

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    Thank you soo much guys and as always thanks rich for your comprehensive advice :)

    So do you think it would be better and more relevant for 1st line support to do the A+, N+? because I know with the support of here I can put my ass power in and do the 7--680. But if it will equip me better to do the other 2 , i will rather do them.
     
  9. The Zig

    The Zig Kilobyte Poster Forum Leader

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    Personally, I did the A+ first. And if I were starting out again I'd do the same.

    The A+ is entry-level, but don't mistake that for 'easy.' It's a good exam because it's very broad - probably the broadest exam in IT - covering everything from how to partition hard-drive, through types of security, good practice, hardware components, obscure bits of Windows, networking devices, to how to deal with angry customers. It's a very solid foundation.

    The next one I did was the MCDST - which again covered customer support, deeper troubleshooting techniques, and real familiarity with the user interface. But that's gone. It's replacement - the 70-680 - is definitely pitched at a higher, and not so practical level, with things like setting up deployment servers, creating images, answer files and group policies. Great, but it's no longer a breaking-into-IT type of qualification.

    My advice. A+.
    Next, ideally - if you can find a way to enroll on them - Microsoft's new entry level tests the MTA (Microsoft Technical Associate). I don't think they're classed as MCP qualifications but they're a rock-solid way to get a Microsoft logo on your CV. The Windows Operating System Fundamentals one (98-349) would be the first one to go for. And the Networking Fundamentals (98-366) could be a nice rest-stop on the climb up to the Network+. Only problem is, they're hard to find atm; I think you can only get them by enrolling on courses that include them.

    If you can't get onto these, bust a gut to get a job off the A+ and you're innate charm. And start working on the Network+ or the 680.
     
    Certifications: A+; Network+; Security+, CTT+; MCDST; 4 x MTA (Networking, OS, Security & Server); MCITP - Enterprise Desktop Support; MCITP - Enterprise Desktop Administrator; MCITP - Server Administrator; MCSA - Server 2008; MCT; IOSH; CCENT
    WIP: CCNA; Server 2012; LPIC; JNCIA?
    shocksl likes this.
  10. soundian

    soundian Gigabyte Poster

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    Personally I don't like the MTA exams. Not the actual exams, just the lack of flexibility and availability.

    They've left a skills gap. The 680 is not for the average IT starter, but the amount of certiport centres is abysmal. The only one in my city (circa half a million people) is in the prison. WTF!! Is that the lengths people will have to go to just to get a break into IT?

    I agree with the A+/N+ combo to start with.
     
    Certifications: A+, N+,MCDST,MCTS(680), MCP(270, 271, 272), ITILv3F, CCENT
    WIP: Knuckling down at my new job
    shocksl likes this.
  11. shocksl

    shocksl Byte Poster

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    thank you soooo much with the info here! i really apreciate it.

    Other than the A+ , N+ what else should I do on the side, to help my chances of having enough skills to break into I.T? I know experience is best, but it's hard to find. What about things like direct active? learning M Office? etc

    I really apreciate all of your guys help, I am overwhelmed with the support. It's better than any other forum I have been to.
     
  12. The Zig

    The Zig Kilobyte Poster Forum Leader

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    Agreed. I'm lucky enough to work around a place that runs them (and, no, I'm not in prison!) On the plus side, Certiport have just been bought by Pearson. With a little luck this means they'll merge some of the services in with the Pearson VUE offerings. If they can run Certiport exams in PearsonVUE centres, the MTA will finally become truly available.

    And from what I'm picking up, both Microsoft and Certiport are pretty pleased with the MTA, so higher availability is something I'm sure they'll all want.

    Things to do on the side? I used to try to get hold of old computers for free, fix them up and donate them. Easy way to do this is to search for "FreeCycle" and find your local area's board, and then hover up any and all old computer kit to see what you can do with it. At first you'll accumulate a fair bit of broken junk to poke around at, but sooner or later you'll manage to bring something back to life and then you'll be hooked. (Tip: Linux is very good - and very free - for resurrecting computers) Can donate them back to Freecycle, or local charities or volunteer organisations. Or even family and friends. Everyone loves free stuff!

    "Active Directory" is good, and appears in every job advert, but IMO is not a massive priority right now. It's very big, and mainly a server side technology. In a nutshell, it's Microsoft's way of setting up a secure network where you can centrally control access to a network and everything in it. It's something you'll come across eventually anyway. Get an idea of roughly what it does. For first line, they mostly need you to be able to create user accounts, reset passwords, and troubleshoot login issues. And set permissions to shared resources. I think the A+ touches on all of this.

    MS Office is pretty big in the corporate world, and people are always gettting into problems with it, so - yes - any skills with it are good. Outlook used to be the big one, followed by Excel. If you have it, really tinker with it. Open every menu, click every button. Look through the help files. There are some Microsoft Office Specialist certifications (MOS), but I've never seen anyone ask for these for a support role.
     
    Certifications: A+; Network+; Security+, CTT+; MCDST; 4 x MTA (Networking, OS, Security & Server); MCITP - Enterprise Desktop Support; MCITP - Enterprise Desktop Administrator; MCITP - Server Administrator; MCSA - Server 2008; MCT; IOSH; CCENT
    WIP: CCNA; Server 2012; LPIC; JNCIA?
    shocksl likes this.
  13. shocksl

    shocksl Byte Poster

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    once against excellent advice , its deffinately affirmed my route choice of studying the A+.
     

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