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70-215 QOTD 21/06/2004

Discussion in 'Windows Server 2003 / 2008 / 2012 Exams' started by AJ, Jun 21, 2004.

  1. AJ

    AJ Administrator Administrator

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    You are a new technical assistant, and you report to the Network Manager. You will help the Network Manger in all aspect of network support within the organisation. Because you are new to Windows 2000 domain administration, the Network Manager has restricted your access the Windows 2000 domain controller. You have been assigned the job of backing up all of the application servers in the domain.
    What should the Network Manager do to allow you to be able to backup all application servers without assigning you additional rights, e.g. like logon to the domain controllers? (Choose one answer)

    A) Make you a member of Backup Operators group.

    B) Make you a member of local Administrators group in all application servers.

    C) Give you Read/Write NTFS permission on all files in all application servers.

    D) Assign "Back up files and directories" and "Restore files and directories" rights to you.
     
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  2. nugget
    Honorary Member

    nugget Junior toady

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    I think A would be the right choice.
     
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  3. tripwire45
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    tripwire45 Zettabyte Poster

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    I'll go with A as well.
     
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  4. Jakamoko
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    Jakamoko On the move again ...

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    Not too wild a stab at A :wink: 8)
     
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  5. tripwire45
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    tripwire45 Zettabyte Poster

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    Now if I go down in flames...I don't go down alone. :wink:
     
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  6. AJ

    AJ Administrator Administrator

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    I think the phrase Crash and Burn spring to mind :eek:

    Correct answer is: D

    Explanation: To successfully back up and restore data on a computer running Windows 2000, you must have the appropriate permissions and user rights, as described in the following list:

    -- All users can back up their own files and folders. They can also back up files for which they have the Read permission.

    -- All users can restore files and folders for which they have the Write permission.

    -- Members of the Administrators, Backup Operators, and Server Operators groups can back up and restore all files (regardless of the assigned permissions). By default, members of these groups have the Backup Files and Directories and the Restore Files and Directories user rights.

    If you are assigned as a member of Backup Operators group, local Administrators group or Read/Write NTFS permission you are allowed to backup the application servers. However, by default, members in Backup Operators group can logon to the domain controller, which is not allowed at the moment. And by adding users local administrators group and assigning Read/Write of all files on the application servers are overkill. You do not need these privileges.
     
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  7. nugget
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    nugget Junior toady

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    Talk about the blind man leading the blind. :oops:
     
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  8. tripwire45
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    tripwire45 Zettabyte Poster

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    Actually, this is how you learn something. I never knew that before. Hopefully, I'll remember that little "factoid" when I need it. :wink:
     
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