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6 weeks as a service desk analyst...think i should move on?

Discussion in 'Employment & Jobs' started by Zeeman, Mar 14, 2008.

  1. Zeeman

    Zeeman Bit Poster

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    Hi Folks,

    Just want your advice on this, I am currently working as a service desk analyst and has been 6 weeks now, BUT I feel I have the skills for 2nd line support in this place.

    As I am a contractor (working through an agency), I am wondering if I should ask my Manager to take me onto second line OR wait till I am more established?

    When DO I decide to make the move? the opportunity has gone already anyway as they have got a new person in 2 days ago, although he doesn't appear to be to IT savvy if you know what I mean :O
    Should I go and tell them to make me next in the Queue or would it be inapropriate given my position and compromise it?
     
    Certifications: CCNA, CCNP, CCNP Security, Security+, Computer Engineer/BENG
    WIP: CEH, Later CISSP and ISO27001
  2. AlexLewis83

    AlexLewis83 New Member

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    I'd go for it.. just say that your interested in moving up to 2nd line and would like an oppurtunity etc. If you don't ask you don't get?
     
  3. punkboy101
    Honorary Member

    punkboy101 Back from the wilderness

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    I would say go for it. The worse they can say is no, and even if they say that, you will have made your interest and intentions clear. Therefore if a possitions appears in the future, they already know you want it.

    Good luck! :thumbleft
     
    Certifications: CCNA
    WIP: Nada
  4. Zeeman

    Zeeman Bit Poster

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    Your right folks, I just needed confirmation I guess :p

    Thanks BTW!
     
    Certifications: CCNA, CCNP, CCNP Security, Security+, Computer Engineer/BENG
    WIP: CEH, Later CISSP and ISO27001
  5. kevicho

    kevicho Gigabyte Poster

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    Personally I would talk to the agency first about this, as they have a contract with the company you are working for for 1st line support staff, if you were to move up this would probably affect the agreement the 2 companies have.

    Also get used to working with numpties in IT, a lot of them are paper technicians (meaning "qualifications" only) who dont usually have the first clue how IT works.
     
    Certifications: A+, Net+, MCSA Server 2003, 2008, Windows XP & 7 , ITIL V3 Foundation
    WIP: CCNA Renewal
  6. BosonMichael
    Highly Decorated Member Award

    BosonMichael Yottabyte Poster

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    Yep, you can certainly ask. They may not give it to you due a lack of experience... but then again, if you're good at what you do on the first line, and they see your potential, they just might. That's exactly how you move up: you do well, you get noticed, you get promoted.
     
    Certifications: CISSP, MCSE+I, MCSE: Security, MCSE: Messaging, MCDST, MCDBA, MCTS, OCP, CCNP, CCDP, CCNA Security, CCNA Voice, CNE, SCSA, Security+, Linux+, Server+, Network+, A+
    WIP: Just about everything!
  7. sunn

    sunn Gigabyte Poster

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    I tend to agree, but 6-wks seems a bit early. Are you certain you’re not being shielded from certain types of issues that might be sent to more experience members of the team? You’ll also run the risk of rubbing team members the wrong way and come off arrogant.

    When you bring it up with management, try to word it in such a way that you don’t sound cocky or degrading of the 1st line team.
     
  8. BosonMichael
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    BosonMichael Yottabyte Poster

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    Excellent advice. And I do agree that six weeks seems early... the only thing that will help him is if he truly is better than those on the 2nd line. The problem is... does his employer realize that after only six weeks?
     
    Certifications: CISSP, MCSE+I, MCSE: Security, MCSE: Messaging, MCDST, MCDBA, MCTS, OCP, CCNP, CCDP, CCNA Security, CCNA Voice, CNE, SCSA, Security+, Linux+, Server+, Network+, A+
    WIP: Just about everything!
  9. harpistic

    harpistic Byte Poster

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    How long is the contract for, anyway? And are the rest of the team contractors or permies? And do you have prior 2nd-line experience?

    You could start by suggesting to your boss that some of the 2nd-line tasks are assigned to you, that way you can prove yourself without coming across as demanding a promotion almost as soon as you arrive. Depending on how you phrase it, openly asking to be promoted could make things awkward, at least this way you can get feedback on your progress so far and if they think you're 2nd-line material.
     
    Certifications: Pet Geekery
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  10. grim

    grim Gigabyte Poster

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    if you dont have much experience then id stick out the 1st line because you could still learn alot and then move on after 6 months to a year. i know no one wants to do 1st line but its the first step to 2nd line.

    Grim
     
    Certifications: Bsc, 70-270, 70-290, 70-291, 70-293, 70-294, 70-298, 70-299, 70-620, 70-649, 70-680
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  11. NightWalker

    NightWalker Gigabyte Poster

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    I agree with harpistic, this would be a very good approach.

    I learnt a lot more than I thought I would doing first line support. Not so much on the technical side but on the customer care and explaining technical stuff to non-techies, that’s the sort of thing you can only learn in a first line role. I would express an interest in moving up to the next level of support, but hang on where you are for a few more months, let the boss see how you work, see if you can get to work on some second line support tasks, get to know the other members of staff a bit better before you try to seriously move up the ladder.
     
    Certifications: A+, Network+, MCP, MCSA:M 2003, ITIL v3 Foundation
  12. Zeeman

    Zeeman Bit Poster

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    Some excellent afvice here, I have decided to wait it out after speaking to my agency. Although they have mentioned that my contract will be extend, I asked them I need a pay rise the next contract as I am doing the same work as everyone else but getting paid less. COntractors are supposed tp get more then perms anyways right? :blink

    Was I asking for a pay increase too soon, it's been 7 weeks now but I have completely got used to the work flow and tasks here 8)

    I ain't really too fussed about 2nd line atm, as I think it is best to give it 6 months here and see the flow before moving onto tech. Althought my career objective is to go into network Admin after I get them Cisco qualifications ... man I am being lazy with it though :rolleyes:
     
    Certifications: CCNA, CCNP, CCNP Security, Security+, Computer Engineer/BENG
    WIP: CEH, Later CISSP and ISO27001
  13. sunn

    sunn Gigabyte Poster

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    How bad do you need the job / experience? If you need the job for any reason, I'd hold off on asking for a raise, but if you feel you can find another opportunity then you might as well ask.
     
  14. BosonMichael
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    BosonMichael Yottabyte Poster

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    Sometimes, but not always. Depends on the benefits offered. For example, in the US, many contract employees work for themselves - neither for the agency nor for the employer. As a result, they have to pay for their own health insurance (majorly expensive). Additionally, these independent contract employees do not receive any paid time off due to holidays, vacations, or sickness. Contract employees are sometimes (but not always) paid more in order to make up for any inequities.

    Contract employees who are actually employed by the agency DO usually get benefits, such as health insurance and paid time off. In these cases, the contract employees do NOT get more money than permanent staff. Again, this is how it works in the US; your situation may differ.

    You may think that 7 weeks is an eternity... but for the employer, that's a short amount of time.

    What Sunn says is solid advice. Look at this from the employer's perspective... if they can find someone to do the same job for less money than you are requesting, they'll either turn down your request or, in extreme cases, simply let you go.

    Warning! Warning! :ohmy Getting Cisco certifications doesn't automagically make you qualified to just walk into a company and be able to administer a network. That comes only with time and experience. It'd be like an Anatomy & Physiology student saying, "When I'm done with A&P, I want to be a doctor. After all, I know how the human body works!" After you pass the CCNA exam, you'll have the theoretical knowledge... but no practical application. And employers will realize that.

    I know you're impatient to get your career going, but you have to take things one step at a time. After all, you're only on first line. People in IT generally go from being a first line tech to desktop support (if they're not already doing that on first line), to systems/server administration, THEN to network administration. And along the way, they pick up valuable experience as they go.

    Experience is the key... not certifications. Certifications can give you an advantage over competition with similar experience levels... but if you've got certifications and no experience, then employers are going to pass you over every time in favor of someone who has experience and no certifications.

    Consider this: let's say you need brain surgery. Would you want someone who has never touched a scalpel, but has studied about brain surgery from a textbook... or someone who has assisted on and performed successful brain surgeries? Or let's say you're having trouble with your car. Would you want to hire someone who has studied from a book about how to fix cars, but has never actually worked on a car (or, for that matter, hasn't even TOUCHED a car) before... or someone who learned as he watched others, and has diagnosed and repaired several car problems? The answer will likely be as clear to you as it is to an employer comparing candidates for a network administration position.
     
    Certifications: CISSP, MCSE+I, MCSE: Security, MCSE: Messaging, MCDST, MCDBA, MCTS, OCP, CCNP, CCDP, CCNA Security, CCNA Voice, CNE, SCSA, Security+, Linux+, Server+, Network+, A+
    WIP: Just about everything!
  15. sunn

    sunn Gigabyte Poster

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    automagically – Nice word :thumbleft


    Couldn’t have said it better. If the brain surgery sounds too unrealistic, then use the car analogy. Both fit to drive the point.
     
  16. Zeeman

    Zeeman Bit Poster

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    Thanks for the advice and I agree. One of the reasons why I am staying on 1st line over 2nd line for now is because I get to see problems before they go to 2nd line. There is a lot of exposure here to the SYs admin, Tech, Net admin and Telecoms so I enjoy it. But it's just that you never know when the next opportunity for 2nd line will come so I was becoming anxious to take it I guess :D

    The Net admin guys have already offered support and if I get CCNA, I most prob will get a net admin position here :D but I need the qualification before I can get the experience in this case, allthough I know both go hand in hand really.

    Everyone thanks for your contribution, gotta say, cool forum :)
     
    Certifications: CCNA, CCNP, CCNP Security, Security+, Computer Engineer/BENG
    WIP: CEH, Later CISSP and ISO27001

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