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5.1 surround now 0.0

Discussion in 'Hardware' started by Sparky, Mar 27, 2006.

  1. Sparky
    Highly Decorated Member Award

    Sparky Zettabyte Poster Moderator

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    My Creative Inspire 5.1 speakers have gone to speaker heaven (I think!)

    I switched them on today and heard a crackle noise from the speakers and the red LED was flickering on the amplifier and then it went off. I thought I must have bumped the plug or something but no, everything was connected correctly. Then I thought it could be the power pack that was causing the problem so I contacted tech support. They gave the usual ‘have you tried plugging it in sir?’ but also suggested plugging the unit back in to see if the powerpack heats up over time and the LED lights up.

    I took the amp and power pack away from the PC and plugged it into another mains socket (with a surge protector) and the same thing happened again with the Red LED flickering.

    I was convinced it was the powerpack that was causing the problem as when I put my ear right next to it there was a loud buzzing noise, well I *think* it was loud as its not exactly a daily event for me to do that! Then I could hear another buzzing noise from the amp then there was a burning smell! I pulled the power out from the amp and the burning smell appeared to be coming from the vent at the top of the amp. :oops:

    Anyways I will check with tech support if they think the amp is toasted and use a multimeter with the powerpack in work to see if it still wants to play.

    Has anyone else had problems with their Creative 5.1 speakers? I did buy them 3 years ago but I paid top £££ thinking they would be an investment but they haven’t outlived my Packard Bell 2.1 speakers which came with my Windows 95 PC! :blink

    Link to the speakers in question:

    http://www.creative.com/products/product.asp?category=4&subcategory=464&product=439&nav=0

    Apologies for the length of the post! :biggrin
     
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  2. Bluerinse
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    Bluerinse Exabyte Poster

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    It sounds to me like the sound output amplifier has bitten the dust Sparky. Smell of burning suggests something has gone short circuit and drawn too much current. Hopefully the PSU survived this.

    Time to invest in some new speakers I am afraid :wink:
     
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  3. r.h.lee

    r.h.lee Gigabyte Poster

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    Some tests that you may be able to do to troubleshoot:
    1. Test the output voltage of the power pack plugged into the wall but not plugged into the amp. It should be a steady voltage reading. If the voltage wavers, then the power pack may be malfunctioning. If the power pack is found to be possibly malfunctioning, then you may have a cause for your amp burnout and may be eligible for a free replacement amp.
    2. Test the resistance of each individual speaker. The one without the consistent value may be the one that's out or on it's way out.
    3. Test each individual speaker on another audio source with appropriate plugs. Appropriate plugs being the 3.5 mm stereo plug/socket, RCA plug/socket, etc. Some examples of "another audio source" could be a cd/tape/radio player, television, or even an iPod if you have one. If you still hear crackling, then maybe that speaker is out or on it's way out.

    Good luck with trying to get a free replacement amp.
     
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  4. Mr.Cheeks

    Mr.Cheeks 1st ever Gold Member! Gold Member

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    Did you entice your speakers with porno music?
     
  5. Sparky
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    Sparky Zettabyte Poster Moderator

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    no speakers to play the music with! :biggrin

    "I'm afraid there is no out of warranty service for this speaker system
    and we do not sell bits and parts of the speaker system" :Technical Support

    Oh well, the powerpack was churning out 19v even though it is rated at 15v, is that normal? :blink
     
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  6. Bluerinse
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    Bluerinse Exabyte Poster

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    Under *no load* conditions yes.
     
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  7. twizzle

    twizzle Gigabyte Poster

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    Due to complicated electronic theory and formula the yes thats right. Most PSU's give a voltage aroun 1.4v higher than quoted under no load. This is the peak to peak voltage in electronic terms, whereas the quoted voltage is the RMS (Root mean square) or average voltage. Of course its also all dependent on the Voltage regulator and transformer ratings and accuarcy in the PSU too. (correct me if im wrong Bluerinse its been a while since i did all this lol :oops: ).

    However, 15V does sound high for a speaker supply to me. Most are around 12v i thought. Not that this would do much staright away, they would just run hot for a while.
    From whats already been said i'd say the fault was in the amplifier circuit of the speakers.. and when that happens you may as well go out and but new ones!
     
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  8. Sparky
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    Sparky Zettabyte Poster Moderator

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    Thanks for all the input guys, think I will have to splash out on new speakers.

    Does anyone want to give me £250? :biggrin
     
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  9. Bluerinse
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    Bluerinse Exabyte Poster

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    Sorry twizzle, I do have to correct you :D

    Peak to peak and RMS both refer to AC (alternating current)voltages. A PSU converts AC to DC (direct current) which does not have peaks or an RMS value.
     
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  10. hbroomhall

    hbroomhall Petabyte Poster Gold Member

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    OK - I'm going to be mischevous here.... :biggrin

    You ever put a 'scope on those cheap AC/DC bricks?

    Harry (running away like mad)
     
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  11. twizzle

    twizzle Gigabyte Poster

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    the PSUs do use AC before the regulator and smoothing ciruit reduces it toa ripple at a DC level.... And its this that makes the DC voltage slightly higher than quoted.. (i think.. like i said its been years lol) But if your right, and you probably are i stand corrected. Like Harry said tho the cheaper PSUs dont regulate well so have a bad ripple on them.....
     
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  12. Bluerinse
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    Bluerinse Exabyte Poster

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    The reason that the voltage is higher under no load conditions is that there is no current being drawn by anything. With no current flow the output voltage will rise slightly but it will still be DC and even with an oscilloscope you would be hard pushed to make a regulated PSU look like a sine wave even if you do up the sensitivity on the y axis to the max :D You will find that any ripple will only be minute and will not be the cause of the voltage being higher than normal under no load conditions.

    It is the rectifier that converts the AC to DC, then it is smoothed and then regulated. So it is already DC *before* it arrives at the regulator.
     
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  13. Luddym

    Luddym Megabyte Poster

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    Jeez, why can I never remember any electronics!
     
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