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2ooo groups

Discussion in 'A+' started by Peter, Nov 27, 2004.

  1. Peter

    Peter Byte Poster

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    Please can you help with this,

    You have a windows 2000 professional computer, you must create groups and user accounts to give users access to resources stored on your computer which of the following types of groups should you create on your computer. ( 1 Choice )

    A, Local,
    B, domain local,
    C, global,
    D, universal,

    I think it is B or C but the more things I read on it the more I get confused,:rolleyes:
     
    Certifications: Elec & Eelc Eng A+
    WIP: CCNA-CCNP
  2. Jakamoko
    Honorary Member

    Jakamoko On the move again ...

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    First question Peter- is the PC standalone, part of a worgroup, or on a domain ?
     
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  3. Peter

    Peter Byte Poster

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    That is the question I don,t have any more details.
     
    Certifications: Elec & Eelc Eng A+
    WIP: CCNA-CCNP
  4. AJ

    AJ Administrator Administrator

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    I suppose then you have to assume that the pc is a standalone and not part of a domain.
     
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  5. Jakamoko
    Honorary Member

    Jakamoko On the move again ...

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    OK, so if we accept that this is a standalone PC, then what do the names of the optional groups suggest to you ?
     
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  6. Peter

    Peter Byte Poster

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    I would say domain local.
    Here is some info on It,



    Universal groups are only available in Native-mode and can be used anywhere within same forest. They can be nested, have users directly assigned, and can be used with ACLs. Universal groups are stored in the Global Catalog (GC) and incur a replication load. If used on a WAN, they should be relatively static.

    Global groups are the primary scope into which users are placed in Mixed-mode domains. Since they are domain-centric, they can not be the only mechanism to restrict/allow access to an object from a different domain, and they do not impose GC replication loads. In Native-mode domains, Global groups can be nested. Domain Local groups can be used for the direct assignment of access policies on objects that are NOT directly stored in the Active Directory (AD), as parts of the AD are replicated to other domains
     
    Certifications: Elec & Eelc Eng A+
    WIP: CCNA-CCNP
  7. Phil
    Honorary Member

    Phil Gigabyte Poster

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    Well, given that you can only make 1 choice, as AJ says you have to assume that the question relates to a standalone PC and not a member of a domain.
     
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  8. Peter

    Peter Byte Poster

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    AH AH the penny drops, so would it be global.:rolleyes:
    Nope Back to the drawing board I just don,t get this one.
     
    Certifications: Elec & Eelc Eng A+
    WIP: CCNA-CCNP
  9. Phil
    Honorary Member

    Phil Gigabyte Poster

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    Look at it this way, you need to be able to see the groups you are granting access to. If the PC is standalone then it isn't a member of a domain so you won't be able to see any domain groups to grant access to. What you need to do is look at the choices available, work out which are domain based groups and rule them out.
     
    Certifications: MCSE:M & S MCSA:M CCNA CNA
    WIP: 2003 Upgrade, CCNA Upgrade
  10. Jakamoko
    Honorary Member

    Jakamoko On the move again ...

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    The information you uncovered for your above post refers to mixed-mode / native-mode / Global Catalogue etc. These are all features of Windows 2000 domains Peter.


    Think on, my friend .... :)
     
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  11. Peter

    Peter Byte Poster

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    In Windows 2000 and later, there are two types of groups: Security and Distribution. In addition, there are three scopes: Universal, Global, and Domain Local. so that rules out local I am confused because I cand find any info other than domain stuff But I am obviously missing something.
     
    Certifications: Elec & Eelc Eng A+
    WIP: CCNA-CCNP
  12. Phil
    Honorary Member

    Phil Gigabyte Poster

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    Well the three scopes are all domain related so that only leaves Local. The question is a bit confusing in that it doesn't tell you whether the PC is in a domain or not and whether the users you are granting permissions to are local to the PC or in a domain. What it does tell you is that they are only expecting you to pick one answer, three of the answers relate to domain related groups and one answer is related to a standalone PC, so I would conclude that they are talking about a standalone PC and just granting users on that PC access to the files or whatever. That just leaves A) local as the answer.
     
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  13. AJ

    AJ Administrator Administrator

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    You are still thinking of groups in a domain.

    This must bu a standalone machine so it can not be part of a domain and therefore not in any domain associated groups.

    If you are using a pc running 2000 or XP and you are not in a domain look at the group you can make and assign resources too.
     
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  14. Peter

    Peter Byte Poster

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    Ok I have got you,

    I just could not get my head around the fact that there are only three scopes in 2000, so where does local fit in as that would make 4 and there is no info on local in 2000.

    But I am for from expert so I trust you guys. Just to let you know I will keep trying to get my Heed aroond that yin.
     
    Certifications: Elec & Eelc Eng A+
    WIP: CCNA-CCNP
  15. Jakamoko
    Honorary Member

    Jakamoko On the move again ...

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    lol Liked the familiar accent at the end, ma freen :D

    If you have a Windows 2000 Pro (or XP for that matter) PC handy that is standalone, look under Computer Management (right-click My Computer>Manage) and you will see Local Users and Groups.

    When you join a PC to a domain, this option is always disabled, and the only way to manage users and groups then is through Active Directory.

    Maybe because w2k Pro and XP Pro are (for the most part) Network Operating System clients, more emphasis is generally placed on the domain group features, as these really are extensive. Consequently, it may appear that less information is available for the local level.

    If you let us know what book(s) you are currently studying from, maybe we can point you towards the more relevant sections for this.

    HTH in the meantime - and a thoroughly good exercise in thinking about a question. :D
     
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  16. Peter

    Peter Byte Poster

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    All in one Michael Meyers. A+ compleate david Groth.

    THANX.
     
    Certifications: Elec & Eelc Eng A+
    WIP: CCNA-CCNP

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