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1 Server + SQL + MySQL + .NET + PHP

Discussion in 'Software' started by garyb, Dec 7, 2007.

  1. garyb

    garyb Byte Poster

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    Hi,
    Looking for some advice here on performance issues with the above apps running on a single server. We currently have a Dell PE2650 Intel Xeon with 2 GB RAM running as our live server with 5 x SQL2000 databases. I have now been asked to put a MySQL database on here too but I am worried about performance issues, obviously dependent on the amount of users hitting it. On the webserver we are running IIS6 & .NET but they also want to configure PHP to connect back to the MySQL server as well
    as IIS connecting back to the SQL2000 from a DMZ to LAN.

    Is this a good idea to host both apps on one server, do they even play together? I'm not keen on the idea and would prefer to keep them seperate until we can migrate the MySQL to SQL, any opinions appreciated.

    To summise:
    DB_SERVER >>>>>> SQL2000 + MySQL
    | |
    | |
    WEBSERVER >>>>>> IIS6 + .NET + PHP


    Cheers
     
    WIP: MCSA 2003
  2. dmarsh

    dmarsh Terabyte Poster

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    It is generally considered a very bad idea to host more than one RBMS on a system.

    Alot of the settings tend to assume they are the only major app on the machine.

    They will both want to consume large ammounts of processor and IO resources.

    In theory its possible with tuning and a fast enough box, dual processor / RAID etc, but why bother ?

    Its generally alot harder and you are possibly looking at a single point of failure. Maybe you could create a dual homed cluster or use virtualisation but you're only talking about one server so lets ignore this.

    Also you will need to have staff trained on both systerms etc, then theres licensing etc etc.

    Thats why most people pick one vendor and stick with it. Of course with open source and open standards this can be less of an issue.

    Seriously how much is an new webserver and database server going to cost ? How many man hours could you waste on breaking the existing setup ? How much will the downtime damage the business ? If its a small set up for a non critical site then sure go ahead.
     
    Certifications: CITP, BSc, HND, SCJP, SCJD, SCWCD, SCBCD, SCEA, N+, Sec+, Proj+, Server+, Linux+, MCTS, MCPD, MCSA, MCITP, CCDH
  3. garyb

    garyb Byte Poster

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    WIP: MCSA 2003
  4. dmarsh

    dmarsh Terabyte Poster

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    Well it sounds like a small shop or non critical system otherwise they wouldn't even consider it.

    I'd mention all you concerns and objections in a document / email, get your boss to accept full responsibility for any ensuing disaster in writing. Theres ITIL and Disater Recovery/Avoidance docs that detail risk analysis etc. Ask around DBA forums and MSSQL & MySQL support what their reccomended install is. Ask them what they think about it. If its a migration ask them what a typical migration strategy might look like etc.

    Theres a few DBA's that frequent CertForums they will probably be able to give you more details.

    Personally I'd ditch IIS while your at it too and implement two seperate stacks on two physically seperate systems. Use Apache instead its currently the best of breed product. If you have any *nix expertise consider not using windows as the OS. Also some non intel servers are much better designed for the high threading / low latency required for web servers.
     
    Certifications: CITP, BSc, HND, SCJP, SCJD, SCWCD, SCBCD, SCEA, N+, Sec+, Proj+, Server+, Linux+, MCTS, MCPD, MCSA, MCITP, CCDH
  5. garyb

    garyb Byte Poster

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    WIP: MCSA 2003
  6. JimmyBash

    JimmyBash New Member

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    hi,

    Well it sounds like a small shop or non critical system otherwise they wouldn't even consider it.

    I'd mention all you concerns and objections in a document / email, get your boss to accept full responsibility for any ensuing disaster in writing. Theres ITIL and Disater Recovery/Avoidance docs that detail risk analysis etc. Ask around DBA forums and MSSQL & MySQL support what their reccomended install is. Ask them what they think about it. If its a migration ask them what a typical migration strategy might look like etc.

    Theres a few DBA's that frequent CertForums they will probably be able to give you more details.

    Personally I'd ditch IIS while your at it too and implement two seperate stacks on two physically seperate systems. Use Apache instead its currently the best of breed product. If you have any *nix expertise consider not using windows as the OS. Also some non intel servers are much better designed for the high threading / low latency required for web servers.

    Thanx I will do this before any steps are taken. :rolleyes:
     
  7. hbroomhall

    hbroomhall Petabyte Poster Gold Member

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    You haven't mentioned much about the machines involved.

    With a *lot* of spindles and a *lot* of memory it may work. Without that it will be painful.

    Harry.
     
    Certifications: ECDL A+ Network+ i-Net+
    WIP: Server+
  8. sumi05

    sumi05 New Member

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    hi



    very cute
     
  9. supernova

    supernova Gigabyte Poster

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    Looks like Harry has an admirer :D
     
    Certifications: Loads
    WIP: Lots
  10. hbroomhall

    hbroomhall Petabyte Poster Gold Member

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    Something that I missed was that the original posting was a year ago..... :ohmy

    Harry.
     
    Certifications: ECDL A+ Network+ i-Net+
    WIP: Server+
  11. supernova

    supernova Gigabyte Poster

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    yes i didn't realise that it was a old post , cheers Jimmy :-p
     
    Certifications: Loads
    WIP: Lots

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